Safety Focused Newsletter - June 2019

Emergency Preparedness During National Safety Month

It’s always important to take a proactive approach to safety in the workplace, but sometimes an emergency can arise at a moment’s notice. Taking some time to plan before an incident takes place can help you take action quickly and ensure the safety of yourself and your co-workers. And, because the National Safety Council organizes National Safety Month every June, it’s a great time to review emergency preparedness in various workplace settings.

Here are some strategies to help ensure you’re ready to respond to an emergency in the workplace:

  • Check workplace policies—There may already be plans in place for how to respond to an emergency, but they’ll only be effective if you and your co-workers follow them. These plans may also include evacuation routes or strategies to help contain a hazard.
  • Stay focused and calm—You may not have time to react to an emergency, so you should always be ready to get to safety at any time. Try to keep essentials on hand so can take them with you, as you should never go back to a dangerous area to gather your belongings.
  • Have a communication plan—After you’re in a safe area, you should have a plan to communicate with your manager, co-workers or emergency responders. Try to meet in a designated location that’s established by a workplace policy and give an update on your status as soon as possible.
  • Help others when possible—Make your own safety a priority during an emergency, but offer any help you can if there aren’t any hazards present. It may be a good idea to check the locations of first-aid kits in your workplace if you need to treat an injury.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are about 330 heat-related fatalities every year.

5 Tips for Outdoor Heat Safety

The hot summer months can cause body temperatures to rise to unsafe levels, especially when combined with strenuous work. Outdoor workers are also be vulnerable to heat-related illnesses since they spend long periods in direct sunlight.

There are many types of heat illnesses, such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, dehydration and heat cramps. Each of these conditions have various symptoms, but they commonly cause dizziness, weakness, nausea, blurred vision, confusion or loss of consciousness.

Here are some tips for staying safe in the heat while working outdoors:

  1. Wear loose, light-colored clothing so your skin gets air exposure.
  2. Shield your head and face from direct sunlight by wearing a hat and sunglasses.
  3. Take regular breaks to rest in a shaded area. If you’re wearing heavy protective gear, consider removing it to help cool off even more.
  4. Ease into your work and gradually build up to more strenuous activity as the day progresses. You should also avoid overexerting yourself during the hottest hours of the day.
  5. Drink water frequently, even if you aren’t thirsty. Experts recommend drinking at least eight ounces every 20 to 30 minutes to stay hydrated. Stick to water, fruit juice and sport drinks and avoid caffeinated beverages, as they can dehydrate you.

Employees should take care to monitor themselves and their co-workers on hot days. If you notice any signs of heat illness, notify your on-duty supervisor immediately.

Heat illnesses can usually be treated by being moved to a cooler area and drinking cool liquids. In extreme cases when heat illnesses cause unconsciousness, health care professionals should be alerted immediately.

Taking some time to plan before an incident takes place can help you take action quickly and ensure the safety of yourself and your co-workers.

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Safety Focused Video - March 2019

This month’s Safety Focused video goes over eye safety in the workplace and tips for safe spring-cleaning.

Every day, more than 2,000 people injure their eyes at work. More than 90 percent of these injuries could be avoided.

Monthly safety tips from


Safety Focused Newsletter - October 2018

Avoid Getting Sick at Work

It can be difficult to avoid getting sick at work, particularly if you work in close quarters. While you may not be able to avoid germs altogether, the following tips can help reduce your risk of getting sick:

  • Wash your hands. Germs can cling to many surfaces in the workplace, including elevator buttons, doorknobs and refrigerator doors. To protect yourself from illness, it’s important to wash your hands regularly, especially before you eat or after you cough, sneeze or use the restroom.
  • Keep your distance. Illnesses like the cold or flu can spread even if you aren’t in close contact with someone. In fact, experts say that the flu can spread to another person as far away as 6 feet. If you notice a co-worker is sick, it’s best to keep your distance.
  • Get a flu shot. Yearly flu shots are the single best way to prevent getting sick. Contrary to popular belief, flu vaccines cannot cause the flu, though side effects may occur. Often, these side effects are minor and may include congestion, coughs, headaches, abdominal pain and wheezing.

In addition to the above, it may be a good idea to avoid sharing phones, computers and food with your co-workers during flu season. Together, these strategies should help you stay healthy at work.

Parking Lot Safety Tips

Parking lots are common hazards for drivers and vehicles alike. Slips, falls, auto accidents, theft, harassment and assaults are just some of the risks individuals face while using parking lots.

Even the parking lots and garages at your place of employment can be dangerous. Thankfully, there are simple and effective precautions drivers can take to protect themselves and their vehicles:

  • Park in a well-lit area, preferably one with surveillance cameras and security patrol services.
  • Avoid parking near shrubbery or other areas that could conceal attackers.

  • Park as close to an exit as possible when using garages.
  • Lock your doors when leaving your vehicle.
  • Remain vigilant, and notify security or the authorities if you notice any suspicious behavior.
  • Lock all of your valuable items in your trunk and out of sight. Avoid leaving purses or wallets in your vehicle.
  • Walk confidently when leaving or returning to your vehicle. If you notice a potential threat, proceed to a safe place, like a public building or store.
  • Use the buddy system, and walk to your car with a co-worker.
  • Have your car keys ready when you near your vehicle.

Staying safe can be easy as long as you’re cautious and mindful of your surroundings.

Avoid Slips and Falls in Parking Lots:

Watch Out for Uneven Surfaces, Curbs and Potholes.

Beware of Ice During Colder Months.

Stay in Well-Lit Areas.

Walk, Don't Run.

Illnesses like colds or the flu can spread even if you aren’t in close contact with someone.

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Risk Insights - Attracting and Retaining Commercial Drivers

Commercial fleets need to maintain a workforce of loyal, qualified drivers in order to succeed. But recently, increased demand for freight volume has highlighted an ongoing driver shortage that’s left many motor carriers operating under capacity.

In order to ensure that your business is attracting and retaining talented drivers, you need to evaluate how the shortage may be affecting you and the steps you can take to make your workplace appealing.

What’s Contributing to the Shortage?

The first step when attracting or retaining drivers should be to understand the underlying causes of the driver shortage:

  • Wages—According to the National Transportation Institute, drivers’ wages have lagged behind both inflation and minimum wage increases. Since 2006, for-hire drivers have seen wage increases of 6 percent compared to a 17 percent increase for private fleet drivers. However, inflation and the minimum wage have increased by 18 and 40 percent over that same period, respectively.
  • Age—The average age for a commercial driver is 55, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. More drivers are retiring every day, and a federal law that prohibits drivers under the age of 21 from obtaining intrastate commercial driving licenses makes it difficult to attract younger replacements before they enter another industry.
  • Lifestyle—Commercial drivers often operate over long hours without breaks and are frequently away from home. Many motor carriers also assign new drivers to long or isolated routes, which can make open positions unappealing to prospects.
  • Growing economy—As the U.S. economy continues to grow, increased demand from retailers has led to record demand for trucking capacity, putting a strain on available drivers.

In-house Adjustments to Attract Drivers

Before you consider changing your pay models or workplace benefits, there may be some operational changes you can review to attract or retain drivers:

  • Offer flexible scheduling. Many prospective drivers are afraid of being away from home for long periods of time, and giving them the option to work closer to home can make your business more appealing.
  • Consider new fleet management procedures or technology to help reduce your drivers’ average length of haul. Although you want to keep your drivers on the road frequently to increase your capacity, reducing the average length of haul can help drivers improve their health and manage the balance between their work and home lives.
  • Adjust training programs to target other departments or industries. Prospective drivers may be intimidated by the amount of experience or legal requirements needed to obtain a commercial driver license. Simply adjusting your training programs can help your business integrate drivers from outside the industry.


Increased demand for freight volume has highlighted an ongoing driver shortage that’s left many motor carriers operating under capacity.


Wage Considerations

One of the most effective ways to appeal to drivers is to increase wages. Although this can be done by simply giving drivers a set raise or bonus, there are alternative payment models and other considerations to keep in mind:

  • Bonuses—Many carriers now offer staggered bonuses that incentivize retention, such as $10,000 bonus that’s split into payments after a driver has worked for 30 days, 90 days and six months. However, some experts believe that these bonuses may also cause drivers to leave once they’ve collected all of their payments.
  • Hourly pay—Drivers aren’t frequently paid by the hour because it’s hard to prove when they’re on duty. But now, tracking technology like GPS and electronic logging devices can make it easy for carriers to know when their drivers are on the job.
  • Flexible models–Many businesses have started to incorporate multiple pay models into their operations to accommodate drivers. For example, drivers who are paid by the mile earn very little when slowed by traffic or unloading. Now, tracking devices can detect legitimate delays and switch to a different pay model during that time in order to make long or congested routes more appealing.

When considering raises, bonuses or other pay models, keep in mind that your drivers’ wages could impact your liability or workers’ compensation rates. Contact us at 920-921-5921 for more help addressing your specific concerns.

Workplace Benefits

Another way to make your business appealing to talented drivers is to offer a competitive benefits package and create a positive work environment. Besides 401(k) investment matching and comprehensive medical coverage, you should consider the following:

  • Paid time off to allow drivers to visit home or take a break while still making an income
  • In-house programs that reward successful drivers with priority at service stations, pay bonuses or new equipment
  • New equipment and vehicles to make drivers’ day-to-day operations easier and attract tech-savvy applicants

Additionally, an emphasis on respect can help your business attract and retain drivers. Experts believe that drivers may be turned away from the transportation industry due to a perceived lack of respect for the long hours they put into their jobs. Make sure to show drivers they’re respected by paying attention to their feedback, recognizing their accomplishments and staying involved in their personal and professional lives.

Finding Consistent Success

The driver shortage isn’t going away anytime soon, and you need to constantly review your operations to ensure you’re attracting and retaining a talented workforce. Get in touch with Hierl Insurance Inc. today for more resources on driver training, legal requirements and transportation-specific news.


OSHA Cornerstones - Second Quarter 2018

In this Issue

OSHA Delays Beryllium Rule Enforcement

The agency also clarified requirements for the construction and shipyard industries.

Majority of Establishments Failed to Submit 2016 Electronic Reporting Data

A delayed compliance date and confusion about exemptions caused many establishments to fail to report 2017 data electronically.

OSHA Releases Two New Fact Sheets on Electricity Safety

These new resources can help protect employees who frequently work around electricity and downed power lines.

OSHA Delays Beryllium Rule and Clarifies Requirements for Construction and Shipyards

Although OSHA’s final rule on beryllium exposure in the general, construction and shipyard industries became effective on May 20, 2017, the agency recently announced that it will delay enforcement until May 11, 2018. OSHA also announced that some of the rule’s requirements will vary between the three affected industries.

Beryllium is a toxic metal that’s commonly found in machine parts, electronics and aircraft. The metal is a known carcinogen and can also cause respiratory problems, skin disease and many other adverse health effects. For these reasons, OSHA has lowered the exposure limits for employers in the general, construction and shipyard industries:

  • The permissible exposure limit (PEL) of an eight-hour average has been lowered to 0.2 micrograms per cubic meter of air (μg/m3). The previous PEL was 2.0 μg/m3, a limit that OSHA found to pose a significant health hazard to employees.
  • The short-term exposure limit (STEL) over a 15-minute period has been lowered to 2.0 μg/m3.

Although the new beryllium rule contains additional requirements, OSHA will only require the construction and shipyard industries to follow the new PEL and STEL. The agency stated that employees in these industries don’t frequently work near dangerous amounts of beryllium and are protected by the safety requirements found in other OSHA standards.

General industry employers must follow these additional beryllium control methods:

  • Provide exposure assessment to employees who are reasonably expected to be exposed to beryllium.
  • Establish, maintain and distinguish work areas that may contain dangerous amounts of beryllium.
  • Create and regularly update a written beryllium exposure plan.
  • Provide adequate respiratory protection and other personal protective equipment to employees who work near beryllium.
  • Train employees on beryllium hazards and control methods.
  • Maintain work areas that contain beryllium and—under certain conditions— establish facilities for employees to wash and change out of contaminated clothing or equipment.

For more information on the new rule, call us at 920-921-5921 and ask to see our Compliance Bulletin on beryllium exposure.

Majority of Establishments Failed to Submit 2016 Electronic Reporting Data

According to a new report from Bloomberg Environment, a majority of the establishments that were required to submit 2016 injury and illness data under OSHA’s electronic reporting rule failed to do so. OSHA expected to receive about 350,000 reports, but the agency only received just over 150,000.

The final date to submit 2016 injury and illness reports was Dec. 31, 2017, but this date was delayed a number of times as OSHA worked to build its Injury Tracking Application and improve its cyber security. Bloomberg also attributes the large number of missing reports to confusion about exemptions, as OSHA received over 60,000 reports from exempt establishments.

Under the rule, the following establishments must submit data electronically:

  • Establishments with 250 or more employees that are required to keep injury and illness records must submit OSHA Forms 300, 300A and 301.
  • Establishments with 20 to 249 employees that work in industries with historically high rates of occupational injuries and illnesses must submit OSHA Form 300A.

The final date to submit 2017 injury and illness data electronically is July 1, 2018. Beginning in 2019, data from the previous calendar year must be submitted by March 2 annually.

OSHA Releases Two New Fact Sheets on Electricity Safety

OSHA has released two electricity fact sheets in order to protect employees who frequently work with electricity and power lines. According to the Electrical Safety Foundation International, electricity causes over 150 fatalities and 1,500 injuries in U.S. workplaces every year.

Here are some of the topics included in the first new fact sheet, which can provide tips for engineers, electricians and other employees who work with electricity:

  • Generators
  • Power lines
  • Extension cords
  • Equipment
  • Electrical incidents

The second fact sheet focuses on downed electrical wires and can help employees involved in recovery efforts following disasters and severe weather events.

Protecting employees from electrical hazards not only keeps your business productive, it can also save you from costly OSHA citations. The agency’s electrical wiring method standard is one of the top 10 most frequently cited standards nearly every year.

For resources that can help safeguard your business against electrical hazards, contact us today.