Implementing Auto Safety in the Workplace

Driving requires concentration and awareness. It only takes one distraction to lose control of your vehicle and crash. Most drivers overlook the importance of keeping their eyes on the road with a significant number attempting to text while driving. In this article, Cathleen Christensen, the Vice President of Property & Casualty at Hierl Insurance, sheds light on this issue and highlights some measures employers can take to curb such accidents.

After falling from 42,836 deaths in 2004 to 32,744 in 2014, fatalities are on the rise again and stand at 37,133 for 2017. The number one cause of all car accidents is distracted driving. “These crashes are largely due to drivers’ negligence,” Cathleen explained. A car traveling at about 55 miles per hour takes approximately five seconds to cover the length of a football field. Five seconds is also the average duration it takes to read a text. At work zones, the few seconds it takes for a driver to get distracted are enough to have them crashing into the work zone. In fact, distracted drivers are 29 times more likely to crash in work zones.

Insurance Losses

Insurance companies are taking the brunt of the financial consequences of drivers’ carelessness by paying for serious losses. The 2016 industry-wide commercial auto combined ratio reached a 15-year high of 110.4%, and the segment has produced an underwriting loss for six years running after years of underwriting profits. According to Cathleen, “One of the primary causes of the industry losing money is distracted drivers. These are drivers who are either talking on the phone or texting while driving. The real consequences are higher insurance premiums for our business customers.”

Measures Employers Should Take to Avoid Losses

Everyone needs to be aware of these measures to minimize accidents caused by distracted driving:

  • Better public education – Drivers need to be educated on the dangers of using their mobile devices while driving.
  • Implement safety policies and make sure employees understand them. These policies include making drivers aware of speed limits, checking their speed gauges and locking their vehicles when they are away from them.
  • Implement a policy regarding the use of phones while driving. Consider using an app that will help keep this policy in place. Employers should prohibit any work-related activity that requires drivers to text or make calls while driving.

Commercial drivers should not be left behind when developing new safety standards for your workforce. Some great recommendations are the following:

  • Review driving records
  • Review and inspect equipment for commercial drivers on a regular basis
  • Implement a sleep safety policy – truck drivers are especially prone to falling asleep while driving due to fatigue as a result of driving very long distances without rest
  • Educate employees on these requirements

What Can Hierl Do to Help?

At Hierl, we listen to clients’ needs and learn about their business to create programs that meet or exceed their expectations. We continuously work with customers to ensure driver safety and provide them with a matrix to help them have an objective measure to look at driving records. We also provide employers with communication material to keep their drivers aware of issues and concerns related to their safety as a prevention measure.

For more information regarding this issue, you can contact Cathleen Christensen at 920-921-5921 or by email at cchristensen@hierl.com.


Construction Risk Advisor - November 2019

Improving Safety Through New-hire Orientation

According to industry experts, workplace injuries in the construction industry cost businesses over $1 billion per week in 2018. Safety management remains a hugely important factor in the construction industry, but it’s not only for the obvious reasons of protecting your employees. Your safety management performance can also directly affect being awarded contracts as well as negotiating them.

As an employer in the construction industry, preventing potentially fatal accidents is a process that starts long before an employee even reaches a construction site. Your responsibility to protect your workers begins from day one, long before they start what will be their everyday work.

The Importance of Orientation

One of the best methods for protecting your employees from the beginning is to have an effective and extensive orientation process. While onboarding new employees is an important step for all companies, those in highly regulated industries should prioritize it even more.

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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In the construction industry, new hires fall victim to a disproportionate number of injuries. According to industry experts, more than 50% of injuries involve employees with less than 12 months of experience.

While there are universal factors across construction, even if a new hire has prior experience in the industry, it is important to introduce them to your company’s culture, past experiences and specific projects.

Ponder the Process

With new employees being at greater risk for injuries, it’s imperative that companies take the time to ensure that orientation is well-thought-out. Consider these steps as part of your hiring and onboarding plan:

  1. Pre-employment screening—This can include drug and alcohol screening as well as checking training certificates and credentials, motor vehicle records and driver qualifications.
  2. Safety onboarding—Provide an accident-prevention program, a safety procedures manual and hands-on training for specific safety skills.
  3. Mentorships—Pair up new hires with experienced workers so they can be immersed in your company’s safety policies and have consistent reinforcement.
  4. Check-ins—Schedule regular reviews with new hires to make sure that the training was adequate and effective for them.

Value Your Workers

Having successful safety policies and introducing them effectively is very important, not only to ensure the wellness of your workforce, but also to help your company secure contracts. Protect your present and plan for your future by making orientation a priority.


Commercial Risk Advisor - October 2019

The Cost of Employee Turnover

High turnover rates can be incredibly costly to an organization, making employee retention vital to success. While established employees can offer valuable insights based on their experiences in the organization, when they leave the organization they take all of that experience with them, forcing resources to be used on finding and training a replacement.

The cost of turnover can be divided into two types: direct and indirect.

  • Direct costs include those tied to replacement costs such as advertising the open position, and interviewing and testing candidates; and the costs of training new hires.
  • Indirect costs include factors that cannot be measured directly but are costly nonetheless, such as lost productivity and knowledge, and lower morale as a result of turnovers.

While the exact cost of each turnover varies, estimates suggest that replacing an employee could cost as high as 200% of the annual salary of that departing employee.

Keeping Turnover Low

Employee turnover is often caused by insufficient employee engagement. While compensation is typically a factor in turnovers, the lack of opportunities to advance and a stressful or otherwise unsatisfactory work environment are also contributing factors. Focus on improving company culture, pay and benefits, and providing a clear path for career development. Offering the ability to submit suggestions and complaints anonymously can encourage otherwise intimidated employees to share their insights.

Additionally, conducting exit interviews with departing employees can offer valuable insight into the exact cause of turnovers and what can be improved to increase employee retention. Any recurring complaints indicate areas for close examination and improvement.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor - slips, trips and falls account for over 95 million lost work days every year.

10 Tips to Avoid Slips, Trips And Falls at Your Workplace

Slips, trips and falls account for a large percentage of workplace accidents. As an employer, it is your responsibility to make certain all of your employees are following proper safety procedures and guidelines set in place by your company to ensure their safety.

Thankfully, there are various actions you and your workers can take to help alleviate workplace injuries caused by slip, trip and fall hazards.

Tips to Avoid Slips, Trip and Fall Hazards

To make sure all of your employees are working in a safe environment—the following 10 tips can help you and your workers minimize slip, trip and fall hazards at your company:

1. Maintain good housekeeping practices. A clean facility is your first line of defense against slips, trips and falls.

2. Require employees to wear the appropriate footwear required for specific job duties (e.g. nonslip, closed toe or  water-resistant).

3. Encourage employees to stay alert while on the job by eliminating any distractions that could cause them to lose focus and overlook a potential hazard.

4.  Place wet floor signs by all spills or wet surfaces to alert workers of a slipping hazard.

5.  Ensure spills are cleaned up immediately after they occur—try instating a cleanup procedure that explains the proper protocol for quickly and effectively cleaning a spill.

6.  Verify that all areas being utilized by employees are well-lit and that lightbulbs are being replaced regularly.

7.  Keep all high-traffic areas free of any objects, spills or debris in order to provide a safe walkway for all employees.

8.  Perform regular maintenance on all flooring, safety rails and stairs to avoid any instability that may lead to an injury.

9.  Assign workers cleanup responsibilities to help minimize various hazards that can accumulate throughout the day.

10.  Conduct regular inspections of your workplace to identify and resolve any slip, trip and fall hazards.

Discuss these tips with your employees to help reduce injuries caused by slips, trips and falls.

A turnover could cost as much as 200% of the annual salary of the departing employee.

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