Paid Leave Pitfalls

Paid leave is a crucial benefit for employers to give and is one that attracts new hires to a company. While there are many pros to paid leave it is important for employers to avoid the pitfalls.

Here are four potential pitfalls of paid leave, and how employers can avoid them.

1. Be careful what you call “maternity leave.”

Employers have long been granting leave for new moms in the form of disability coverage. In fact, the top cause of short term disability is pregnancy. Disability insurance usually grants new moms six to eight weeks of paid leave to recover from childbirth.

Because this coverage applies to the medical condition of recovering from childbirth, it shouldn’t be lumped in with bonding leave.

Guidance from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission says leave granted for new moms for bonding must also be extended to new dads, so separating disability leave from bonding leave is crucial to avoiding gender discrimination.

2. Don’t make gender assumptions.

The amount of bonding time for new parents after birth, adoption or fostering must be granted equally for men and women. Companies that don’t provide the same amount of paid leave for men and women may find themselves in a discrimination lawsuit.

It’s not just the time away from work that matters, but also the return-to-work support provided. If new moms are granted temporary or modified work schedules to ease the transition back to work, new dads must also have access to this.

Some companies may choose to differentiate the amount of leave and return-to-work support for primary or secondary caregivers. That’s compliant as long as assumptions aren’t made on which gender is the primary or secondary caregiver.

The best way to avoid potential gender discrimination pitfalls is to keep all parental bonding and related return-to-work policies gender-neutral.

3. Avoid assuming the length of disability.

Be careful about assuming the length of time a new mom is disabled, or recovering medically, after birth. Typical coverage policies allow six to eight weeks of recovery for a normal pregnancy, so assuming a new mom may be out for 10 weeks might be overestimating the medical recovery time, and under-representing the bonding time, which must be gender-neutral.

4. Keep up with federal, state and local laws.

Mandated leave laws are ever-evolving, so employers should consistently cross-check their policies with state and local laws. For instance, do local paid leave laws to treat adoption the same as birth? Are multistate employers compliant? What if an employee lives in one state but works in another: Which state’s leave policies take precedence?

Partnering with a paid leave service provider can mitigate the risk of improperly administering leave. Paid leave experts can help answer questions, review guidelines and provide information regarding job-protecting medical or family leave.

They can also help flag potential pitfalls, ensuring leave requests from all areas of your company are managed uniformly and in accordance with state and federal laws, including the EEOC.

SOURCE: Bennett, Angel. (29 July 2019) “4 pitfalls of paid leave and how clients can avoid them” (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from https://www.employeebenefitadviser.com/list/pitfalls-of-paid-family-leave-and-how-to-avoid-them


Disability Insurance. Do You Have It?

Auto-enrolling:

There’s a substantial gap between people who believe they need disability insurance and those who actually have it. What’s concerning is the likelihood that employed adults will need disability insurance at some point in their lives.

We have relied on communications during open enrollment to educate employees about the value of disability coverage, but what we often find is that employees steer clear of benefits they don’t want to need. They also may simply be overwhelmed by the number of choices they need to make, or may not review their benefits at all and just keep the selections they made the previous years.

The recent letter of clarification issued by the Department of Labor explains that employer clients covered under ERISA may automatically enroll workers into group disability income insurance plans, similar to the auto-enrollment process for 401(k)s. While many workers may question why they are being enrolled automatically, it's encouraging and reassuring having your employer say, “this is an important coverage that you should have. If you don’t want it, you can opt out.”

Sun Life recently surveyed brokers, employers and employees about the benefits of automatically enrolling employees into disability plans. Respondents used words like ease, safety net, and worry-free. Brokers and clients alike agreed that auto-enroll protects employees who don’t always realize they need protection — but are glad they have it when they need it.

Auto-enrollment means people can rely on disability coverage without having to think about it during enrollment season. Should an employee encounter a major health event that requires leave from work, they also get, in addition to income replacement, the support services affiliated with disability insurance, including support from interdisciplinary teams, including vocational rehabilitation/retraining to create individualized action plans to return an employee to work, health and productivity.

Income protection
Disability insurance replaces income and provides a financial cushion during a time of upheaval in a person’s life. According to the Council on Disability Awareness, one in four working Americans will miss up to three months of work due to illness, injury or pregnancy/maternity leave during their career. The Federal Reserve says that most Americans do not have enough savings to cover three months of living expenses, and nearly half of consumers today say they could not pay an unexpected bill of $400. To put it simply, even a short term leave of absence could leave many families with a hefty financial burden — which can impact mental and even physical health, potentially slowing recovery and increasing leave duration.

Disability is not just income insurance, it covers the process by which someone can receive the help and support they need to recover and come out the other side to return to work. This can including vocational training for a different position, behavioral health analysis, clinical consulting, workplace accommodations and treatment.

Perception vs. reality
Although considered a valuable coverage, people are woefully under insured when it comes to disability. There’s a substantial gap between those who believe they need disability insurance and those who actually have it. In a recent Sun Life survey, of the 35% of employee respondents who do not currently have disability coverage, 76% say they believe the benefit has value. A recent LIMRA survey showed that while 48% of respondents felt they personally needed the benefit, only 20% actually had it. A common misconception is the ease with which someone might obtain federal disability or social security support — only about 35% of applicants receive benefits, and the appeals process can take years.

Successful implementation
Although auto-enrollment is not a new concept, it’s not as common with disability and so employees will need in-depth, strategic communications to ensure they understand what they’re getting and why it’s a valuable asset to their financial security. Feedback from brokers, employers and employees in Sun Life’s recent survey showed that auto-enrollment fills a need of coverage regret, where employees realize too late and wished they had enrolled in the benefit.

A communications strategy should be mapped out for the year, not just at enrollment season. Once a strategy is determined, multiple, spaced out employee communications will help employees understand the process, learn more about the benefit and opt out if they choose.

Disability auto-enrollment provides a safety net to every employee, without the arduous steps within the enrollment process. It helps to reduce time spent on enrollment (particularly if using a benefits administration platform) and if communicated and rolled out effectively, can become an integral part of benefits enrollment strategy.

SOURCE: Healy, David. (5 August 2019). "Advantages of auto-enrolling workers in disability insurance" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from: https://www.employeebenefitadviser.com/advantages-of-auto-enrolling-workers-in-disability-insurance

 


Commercial Risk Advisor - August 2019

Dress Code Policy Considerations

Clothing and fashion choices can be a fun way for your employees to express themselves while also helping them feel comfortable. But, not all types of expression and comfort are appropriate for the workplace.

The reasons for establishing a dress code can vary, whether maintaining professionalism or guaranteeing safety. Regardless of why your company might need one, it’s important to put thought into crafting your dress code.

Think about these five considerations when putting together a fair and appropriate dress code:

  • Safety—Keep the work environment free of any unnecessary hazards. For example, do not allow employees working with machinery to wear loose jewelry. Also, require appropriate footwear when necessary, such as steel-toed boots or non-slip shoes.
  • Equality—Your employees may come from a wide variety of backgrounds. Make sure that your dress code does not discriminate when it comes to race, religious beliefs and employees with disabilities. Apply the same standards for men and women.
  • Culture—When drafting your dress code, be consistent with the culture and image that your company projects. An organization that claims to be casual and relaxed should think twice before implementing a formal dress code.
  • Balance—You want your workplace to be professional, but you also want your employees to be comfortable. It makes sense to ask employees to wear a suit if meeting with a big client, but otherwise, consider letting them dress down.
  • Current social norms—Understanding current social norms are important. For example, in today’s society, many candidates may have tattoos or piercings. Talk about what is acceptable for your company. A dress code that is too strict can have a negative effect on your organization recruiting top talent.

Four of the 10 costliest hurricanes in U.S. history have occurred in the past decade.

Preparing for Hurricane Season

Hurricane season runs from June through November and brings plenty of risks. Threats relating to hurricanes don’t only apply to homeowners and aren’t limited simply to physical damage either.

There are plenty of ways that a storm can blow away your business. According to FEMA, over 40% of small businesses never reopen after a disaster, and 90% close within a year if they aren’t able to reopen within five days.

An organization that claims to be casual and relaxed should think twice before implementing a formal dress code.

Protect your company and your employees by taking these steps to be as prepared as possible:

  • Reinforce your workplace from weather hazards with things like window shutters to block flying debris, and sandbags to absorb floodwater.

  • Have an emergency response plan in place and make sure that your employees are trained to follow it. Emergency response plans can include steps such as establishing warning and evacuation procedures, ensuring reliable means of communication, and having supplies such as food, water, flashlights and batteries on hand.
  • Beyond protecting your employees and your physical workplace, it is also important to ensure that your business can function following a hurricane. Back up your data off-site regularly, and test the recovery process to make sure that everything is working properly.
  • Make sure that you are prepared to contact the correct people to get back on your feet. Try to connect with a contractor or restoration company before a hurricane strikes.
  • Even if your business is prepared for a hurricane, others might not be. Companies that you partner with or rely upon could be damaged and hinder your own ability to function. Talk to other businesses that you work with and make sure that they have contingency plans.

An organization that claims to be casual and relaxed should think twice before implementing a formal dress code.

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Trucking Risk Advisor - August 2019

CVSA Brake Safety Week: Sept 15-20

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) Brake Safety Week is scheduled for Sept. 15-21. Roadside safety inspections on commercial motor vehicles will be conducted throughout North America by law enforcement officials. Brake Safety Week is an initiative by the CVSA in an effort to lessen the severity and number of crashes caused by faulty brake systems.

Although all components of a motor vehicle’s brake system are crucial to overall safety and function, the inspectors will be paying close attention to a vehicle’s brake hoses and tubing this year. The result of last year’s three-day International Roadcheck enforcement campaign showed that brake system violations made up 45% of all out-of-service violations.

If your commercial vehicle fails to meet the CVSA braking standards or any other inspection item, your vehicle may receive a violation that will result in traveling restrictions until the violation has been corrected.

Inspectors will be looking at four main factors when checking the hoses and tubing of a commercial motor vehicle’s brake system, checking to make sure they are:

  • Undamaged
  • Properly attached
  • Leak-free
  • Appropriately flexible

In order to pass the inspection, all commercial trucks and combination vehicles over a gross weight of 10,000 pounds must have a braking efficiency of at least 43.5%. In 14 jurisdictions, this calculation will be determined by using performance-based brake testers (PBBT), which calculate overall brake efficiency and force over the total gross weight.

Avoid violations during this year’s inspection by conducting regular maintenance on all vehicle operational systems.

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Construction Risk Advisor - August 2019

Preventing Construction Site Theft

Theft can be especially devastating for construction sites, as it can cause dramatic delays in production and force contractors to pay out of pocket to replace equipment and finish jobs. Fortunately, taking several precautionary measures can help reduce the threat of construction site theft.

Consider the following tips to deter thieves from impacting your bottom line:

  • Safeguard your equipment—It may sound simple, but reminding employees to put their tools away after work can prevent most instances of theft. If possible, keep tools locked in a garage, locker or other secure location each night. Additionally, remind employees to ensure that functioning locks are attached to any storage units and offices before they leave the worksite.
  • Stop unauthorized entries—Denying unauthorized access to your worksite is a critical first step to preventing theft. Consider utilizing a reinforced fence with a single locked entrance and exit. For added safety, run barbed wired along the top of the fence.
  • Provide lighting on your construction site at night—Using lights to illuminate construction sites at night is an effective and low-cost way to deter thieves. Ensure that common targets like on-site storage units and offices are well lit. For added protection, motion-activated lights can be used to scare away potential thieves and are useful in poorly lit and less-trafficked areas.
  • Use video equipment to monitor your construction site—Modern advances, like solar-powered video cameras with wireless internet capabilities, make it easy for you to remotely monitor your construction site for suspicious activity. In the event of a theft, surveillance footage can potentially help identify the culprit.

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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Safety Focused Newsletter - August 2019

Treating Pain Without Opioids

Although opioids are an effective treatment for short-term pain management, their highly addictive nature has led to widespread misuse. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that over 115 people die from opioid overdoses every day, making the ongoing epidemic one of the most dangerous health issues in decades.

Research from the American College of Physicians (ACP) has found that alternative, noninvasive and therapy-based pain treatments can be more effective than opioid use, without the risk of addiction. And, while the guidelines do recommend the use of opioids and other medications as a last resort, therapeutic treatments can help strengthen and heal the body naturally.

Here are some of the ACP’s recommendations for treating pain:

  • Use heat or ice packs to reduce pain and swelling—Regulating how much blood flows into affected areas can be a simple and effective way to reduce pain.
  • Exercise when possible—Although exercising to relieve pain may sound strange, even low-intensity activity like stretching or walking can help strengthen your muscles and relieve pain. Consult with a health care or fitness professional to customize a safe and effective exercise routine for any severe or chronic pain.
  • Avoid overexertion—Rest will allow any injured tissue and nerve roots to heal. However, too much rest can cause your muscles to weaken.
  • Engage in relaxing activities such as yoga and meditation—Research has shown that the mental aspect of physical pain can cause it to be much more intense than it would be otherwise.
  • Explore your options—Talk with your doctor about alternative pain relievers and anti-inflammatory medications. You could also discuss when to use or how to wean off strong narcotics. Opioids should only be considered as a last resort.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, sprains and strains account for nearly 40% of all nonfatal work injuries.

Preventing Sprains and Strains

Sprains, strains and tears to muscles and connective tissues are some of the most common injuries that employees experience. These injuries can come from a number of common activities, such as lifting something heavy, being hit by falling objects or even a simple misstep. Overusing your muscles can also cause these injuries over time.

To reduce your risk of experiencing sprains and strains on the job, keep these tips in mind:

  • Use extreme caution if you are lifting something particularly heavy. When in doubt, ask for help moving the object.
  • Reduce repetitive movements if possible. Chronic strains are usually the result of overusing the same muscles.
  • Use proper form when completing tasks, as over gripping can increase the risk of hand and forearm strains.
  • Consider your posture when sitting for long periods of time, and maintain an overall relaxed position.

  • Maintain a healthy fitness level outside of work to keep your body strong and flexible.
  • Avoid slippery surfaces, and use harnesses and nets if working at heights above ground level.
  • Wear proper footwear, gloves and other protective equipment to avoid sprains and strains.
  • Stretch before you begin working, and take short breaks throughout the day to stretch and rebalance your body.If you have any questions or concerns about sprains or strains, do not hesitate to contact your supervisor.

The CDC estimates that over 115 people die from opioid overdoses every day, making the ongoing epidemic one of the most dangerous health issues in decades.

“The CDC estimates that over 115 people die from opioid overdoses every day, making the ongoing epidemic one of the most dangerous health issues in decades.”

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Creating an ‘urgent care first’ mindset for employee benefits

Urgent cares are popping up everywhere, making getting quick healthcare easier and more convenient for patients. Read this blog post to learn why it's important to guide employees to adopt an "urgent care first" mentality.


Urgent care centers are popping up everywhere, which means getting quick healthcare is easier and more convenient for patients. But these centers could also help employers minimize expensive emergency room claims. That’s why it’s important to guide employees to adopt an “urgent care first” mentality.

The concept of urgent care has been around since the 1970s, but rising healthcare costs, especially for ER care, have spurred an increase in centers across the U.S. over the last decade. In fact, from 2014 through June 2017, the number of urgent care centers rose by nearly 20%.

Urgent care centers provide care for health problems that aren’t life-threatening, but can’t wait for an appointment with a primary care provider. No one wants to suffer with a sore throat all weekend. Many urgent care centers are staffed with doctors and nurses, and provide more advanced capabilities than what’s typically available at a primary care doctor’s office. For example, some urgent care centers give stitches, provide X-rays and even MRIs.

Patients can also get treatment at urgent care for conditions they’d typically see a primary care doctor for, such as the flu or a fever, mild to moderate asthma, skin rashes, sprains and strains, and a severe sore throat or cough — illnesses that produce unnecessary high claims if treated in an ER.

Still, when a severe sore throat and high fever strike on a weekend and the doctor’s office is closed, employees may gravitate to the ER because they’re sick and need help right now. That’s where the urgent care first mindset becomes good medicine. It typically costs the employer (and often the employee) far less if that sore throat is treated in an urgent care facility.

The high cost of ER care is enough to make anyone run a high temp. From 2009 to 2016 (the most recent data available), the average amount that hospitals billed insurance carriers for an emergency room visit more than doubled, from $600 to $1,322. By contrast, urgent care typically costs about $150 per visit. Members often pay a lower copay for urgent care visits, too.

The urgent care first mindset is starting to take hold. New data analysis from Aetna shows that as urgent care centers began to proliferate, ER visits for minor health issues dropped 36%, while the use of urgent care and other non-emergency health settings increased 140%.

However, the same study shows that plans only saw a decrease in ER visits if there were several urgent care centers in the geographic region where their employees lived. Awareness is key.

Fostering an urgent care first mentality

Employers can’t just include urgent care in a benefits plan and expect employees to use it. They need to design the plan to encourage use and follow up with plenty of education.

Education about the benefits of primary care versus urgent care versus the ER should take place during open enrollment and throughout the plan year so members understand the medical necessity and financial implications of each option. Including the closest urgent care centers to employees, as well as a list of services they provide, can help encourage them to adopt an urgent care first mentality.

A word of caution: not every nearby urgent care center is actually in-network. It literally pays for employees to keep a list of nearby in-network centers handy when that inevitable weekend sore throat strikes.

Reminders about urgent care before spring allergies, summer vacations, fall school physicals and flu season can also help encourage their use.

The too-low ER copay

Plan design is another important piece of the puzzle to help steer employees to the right level of care for their needs. It’s not that unusual to see a $100 copay for an emergency department visit. While no one wants to discourage ER visits for true emergencies, it makes sense to adjust the plan design to encourage primary and urgent care visits instead. That may mean a $20 copay for primary care, a $40 copay for urgent care and a $200 to $250 copay for ER visits — which is waived if the plan participant is admitted to the hospital.

For high-deductible health plans paired with a health savings account, the savings can be even more drastic; patients may pay $200 for an urgent care visit versus $1,200 for an ER visit.

The combination of education and plan design can help curb unnecessary ER visits, which could help employers control healthcare increases from plan year to plan year. For health issues that crop up during off hours, the urgent care first mindset is good for both employers and employees, who will ultimately save time and money.

SOURCE: O'Conner, P. (5 July 2019) "Creating an ‘urgent care first’ mindset for employee benefits" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from https://www.benefitnews.com/opinion/creating-an-urgent-care-first-mindset-for-employees


It’s time to incorporate cancer screenings into your wellness program

About a third of the eligible population has never been screen or are not up-to-date with the cancer screening guidelines. According to the National Cancer Institute, newer FDA-approved novel immunotherapies have shown to be beneficial responses to colorectal cancer, but at staggering costs that can be upward of $400,000 per year. Read this blog post to learn more about incorporating cancer screenings in corporate wellness programs.


Scott Wilson, an employee at brewing company Molson Coors in Denver, was diagnosed with stage four metastatic colorectal cancer in 2016 — a disease that would cost him upward of $1.3 million to date, with significant dollars paid out for non-covered medical expenses.

As a consequence of a later-stage diagnosis, colon and liver resections were necessary coupled with aggressive treatment using chemotherapy and Vectobix — a newer and costly immunotherapy that is priced at $8,000 per week. On average, more than 40,000 people undergo treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer each year and the cost of treatment varies depending on the stage at diagnosis, treatment response and plan.

The availability of newer FDA-approved novel immunotherapies have shown to be beneficial responses to this deadly cancer, but at staggering costs that can be upward of $400,000 per year at market introduction, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Today, about 60% of diagnosed colorectal cases are discovered in later stage disease due to under-screening — a third of the eligible population have never been screened or are not up-to-date with screening guidelines. As a result, about 140,000 Americans are diagnosed with any stage of colorectal cancer and about 51,000 people die of this cancer annually. A recent study examined 1,750 colorectal cancer deaths from 2006 to 2012 in the Kaiser Permanente Health System — 76% of those deaths occurred in patients who were never screened or were not up-to-date with screening.

Cancer screening in the workplace

Last year, the American Cancer Society lowered the colorectal cancer screening age to 45 based on the rising rates of cancer trending in younger age populations — other cancer organization’s recommendations remain at age 50. Employers are in a unique position to reinforce and support these national recommendations among their employees.

Employees between 50 and 65 years of age have the lowest screening rates for colorectal cancer screening, and are typically covered by employer-sponsored health plans. Employers find offering cancer screening programs that reward participation via health and wellness programs are reducing disease risk and financial burdens for themselves and their employees.

The costs for treatment of cancer are more than double the rate of other healthcare expenses. For an employer, the impact of a late versus an early stage diagnosis is significant. National expenditures for treatment and care of colorectal cancer are second only to breast cancer.

In people age 65 and younger, the U.S spends in excess of $7.4 billion for treatment of colorectal cancer. For those employees diagnosed with any stage of colorectal cancer, a large percentage of costs are paid out by company-sponsored health plans despite the implementation of high-deductible health plans.

It would seem prudent to institute a screening initiative to find cancer early in your employee populations, or prevent it altogether by supporting screening for preventable cancers. Employees who test positive are referred by their physician for diagnostic colonoscopy to determine if colorectal cancer is present or to remove precancerous polyps or lesions. The intangible costs associated with cancer is the time off of work for treatment and lost productivity.

Most companies administer a wellness program for employees and families, like Molson Coors, but only about 20% offer colorectal cancer screening. Incorporating a blood test as a preventive cancer screening strategy alongside workplace wellness programs can get employees up-to-date with screening recommendations. Employers who are interested in instituting a colorectal cancer screening program in the office should consider the following suggestions.

Incorporate CRC screening into wellness programs. Screenings provide the opportunity to identify risks early and can bridge the gap between doctor office visits for employees who do not see their providers on a regular or annual basis.

Partner with third-party administrators. Third party administration services can ensure HIPAA regulations are followed for privacy. TPAs also will arrange for the delivery of results.

Create communications campaigns. Target your messaging to those eligible for colorectal cancer screening and make sure to cite the correct statistics for benefits and risk.

Reward participation. Participation is shown to increase when incentives are provided to reward participation. Decide what incentives work for your employees – PTO, financial rewards, gym memberships, coupons or gift cards.

Follow up. Plan for next steps based on employee screenings. Results should be provided in a timely manner to enable employees.

Wilson, the Molson Coors employee, remains in remission for nearly 20 months. He’s since devoted his time to advocate for access to colorectal cancer screening, especially in the workplace. Wilson recently joined the Colorectal Cancer Alliance organization as a board member, a non-profit dedicated to reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer through their many efforts aimed at prevention and awareness. He also wrote a book, “Through the Window: A Photographic Tale of Cancer Recovery” for the alliance. Wilson has been an advocate for the vital need for employee access and employer support for CRC screening in the workplace.

SOURCE: Childers, P. (27 June 2019) "It’s time to incorporate cancer screenings into your wellness program" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from https://www.benefitnews.com/opinion/add-cancer-screenings-to-wellness-programs


How to Sweeten Your Healthcare Offerings to Attract + Retain Employees

Employees are the heart of any great business, and key employees and leaders are essential to long-term success. Once acquiring what you feel like is a complete team, some employees may be exploring other options and walking away. You may also find yourself struggling to attract younger generational employees.

But why is this?

For any employee, benefits are no longer a perk in business; they’re an expected part of compensation.  For any employer looking for ideas on how to ensure their business meets the wants and needs of their employees, Tonya Bahr, one of our expert Benefits Advisors, has outlined three benefits sure to help.

Benefit #1: Gym Memberships

As the old saying goes, “healthy employees are happy employees.” More companies are encouraging healthy habits in and out of the office. The typical employee would like to have the ability to join a gym and work out. This helps negate a general sense of feeling too consumed by work and life, while putting action to their desires. Joining a gym of their liking through the use of a company stipend or expense is a huge plus for many employees and will aid in long-term employee retention.

Benefit #2: Focus on Family

Nobody is without a life away from work. The considerate employer is no stranger to the normal work-life balance and is flexible to offer employees time off when their attention is needed elsewhere – typically family matters. Parents who need to attend a child’s event, a mother who requires maternal leave or those tending to the needs of their elderly loved ones desire a company that doesn’t have a fixed focus on strictly work itself.

Benefit #3: Community Involvement

Numerous studies have found employees increasingly value brands that emphasize doing good around them. From encouraging employees to volunteer on their days off and promising rewards or hosting in-house events, the ways in which your organization can spread a good name into the community is nearly limitless, not to mention, a fun and active way to market your business to prospective employees.

Better Benefits Strategies with Hierl Insurance…

When it comes to Employee Benefits, the experts at Hierl bring an element of strategic innovation to the conversation that others simply are not.  We take pride in the experience we provide our customers focusing in on a clear, defined, proven process and diligent communication to deliver real results that are meaningful to your unique vision and goals as an organization.

The industry has gotten complicated. With an ever shifting landscape, keeping up can be exhausting and trying to plan ahead can seem daunting.When you partner with Hierl, you gain a team of innovative, kind-hearted, strategically focused, big picture experts that work diligently to ensure your outcomes are meaningful where it matters most to you.

For more information, contact Tonya Bahr at 920.921.5921 or tbahr@hierl.com. You can also visit our website for more information on our collective services.

Employee Benefits


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