Employer-sponsored savings programs could be the future of financial wellness

Do you have money set aside for emergencies or unexpected expenses? Forty-three percent of hourly workers report having less than $400 in savings set aside for emergencies. For these workers, an accident or unexpected expense can be financially devastating. Read this blog post to learn more.


For 43% of hourly workers who report having less than $400 in savings set aside for emergencies, an accident or unexpected expense can be financially devastating.

But employer-sponsored savings programs could be a viable solution. Low- and middle-income employees who are more financially secure have been shown to be less stressed and more productive when they have an employer-sponsored savings program, which may lead to lower healthcare costs, better customer service and stronger attendance, a new survey from nonprofit organization Commonwealth finds.

The national survey of 1,309 employees earning less than $60,000 a year found that employers offering workers savings interventions at the time of raise, can positively impact their employees’ personal finances. Three-quarters of hourly employees surveyed believe that if their employer offered savings options at the time of a raise, they would be less stressed and more confident about their finances.

“There's a lot of talk about financial stress, but when you're really living paycheck-to-paycheck, that stress is about being able to pay your bills on time,” says Commonwealth’s executive director Timothy Flacke. “It's about cash flow, and that's a particularly acute form of anxiety.”

The report analyzes the potential effects of savings programs including split direct-deposit paychecks, low-interest loans and savings accounts — and compares how those programs alleviate employees’ financial stress. Workers surveyed believe if their employer-provided savings tools they would be happier and more productive. Moreover, the survey found individuals with more in savings were less likely to have financial worries than those with little savings.

One of the companies partnered with Commonwealth to link raises with savings is Minnesota-based education company New Horizon Academy. In the beginning of the year, the company piloted a new savings program that gives its employees the option to have the raise diverted through the payroll system to a savings account each pay period, instead of having it go into their normal checking account.

“Through this, our employees are beginning to build up some financial reserves in case of an emergency, or life circumstances that requires them to dip into a savings account,” says Chad Dunkley, CEO of New Horizon Academy. Although it’s too early to state results from the pilot program, the company hopes it will have a positive long-term impact on the financial health of its employees, Dunkley says.

“This is just one of those additional ways [to] stabilize our employees, so they can come into the classroom without the financial stress that certain situations cause when you're not prepared for an emergency, whether it's new tires on your car or health issues,” he says.

SOURCE: Nedlund, E. (19 August 2019) "Employer-sponsored savings programs could be the future of financial wellness" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from https://www.employeebenefitadviser.com/news/reduce-stress-increase-productivity-with-financial-wellness


IRS Expands Benefits That Can Be Provided Before HDHP Annual Minimum Deductible Is Met

Recently, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released a notice that expanded the list of preventative care benefits that a high deductible health plan (HDHP) can provide without a deductible or with a deductible below the annual minimum. Read this post from UBA to learn more.


The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released a notice, effective on July 17, 2019, that expanded the list of preventive care benefits that a high deductible health plan (HDHP) can provide without a deductible or with a deductible below the annual minimum deductible.

UBA-1000-HDHP_Chart2

The services and items listed above are treated as preventive care:

  • only when prescribed to treat a person diagnosed with the associated chronic condition listed in the table’s second column, and
  • only when prescribed for the purpose of preventing the chronic condition’s exacerbation or a secondary condition’s development.

SOURCE: Hsu, K. (20 August 2019) "IRS Expands Benefits That Can Be Provided Before HDHP Annual Minimum Deductible Is Met" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from http://blog.ubabenefits.com/irs-expands-benefits-that-can-be-provided-before-hdhp-annual-minimum-deductible-is-met


Compliance Recap - July 2019

July was a busy month in the employee benefits world.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released a notice that expands the list of preventive care benefits a high deductible health plan can provide without a deductible or with a deductible below the annual minimum deductible. The IRS also released the indexed affordability percentage for plan years beginning in 2020.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) published an “A” rating final recommendation. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released an update to the notice requirements for plans using the HHS-administered federal external review process.

A U.S. District Court upheld the 2018 short-term, limited-duration insurance final rule. The Third Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a federal district court’s preliminary injunction regarding contraceptive coverage exemptions.

The Department of Labor (DOL) released an advisory opinion regarding association health plans (AHPs) and multiple employer welfare arrangements (MEWAs). The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals held oral arguments for the case challenging the ACA’s constitutionality.

HHS and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a Safe Importation Action Plan regarding potential drug importation from other countries.

UBA Updates

UBA released one new advisor: New HDHP Preventive Care Benefits

UBA updated or revised existing guidance:

IRS Expands Benefits That Can Be Provided Before HDHP Annual Minimum Deductible Is Met

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released a notice, effective on July 17, 2019, that expanded the list of preventive care benefits that a high deductible health plan (HDHP) can provide without a deductible or with a deductible below the annual minimum deductible.

Preventive Care for Specified Conditions For Individuals Diagnosed with
Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors Congestive heart failure, diabetes, and/or coronary artery disease
Anti-resorptive therapy Osteoporosis and/or osteopenia
Beta-blockers Congestive heart failure and/or coronary artery disease
Blood pressure monitor Hypertension
Inhaled corticosteroids Asthma
Insulin and other glucose lowering agents Diabetes
Retinopathy screening Diabetes
Peak flow meter Asthma
Glucometer Diabetes
Hemoglobin A1c testing Diabetes
International Normalized Ratio (INR) testing Liver disease and/or bleeding disorders
Low-density Lipoprotein (LDL) testing Heart disease
Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Depression
Statins Heart disease and/or diabetes

The services and items listed above are treated as preventive care:

  • only when prescribed to treat a person diagnosed with the associated chronic condition listed in the table’s second column, and
  • only when prescribed for the purpose of preventing the chronic condition’s exacerbation or a secondary condition’s development.

Read more about the expanded list of preventive care benefits.

IRS Releases the Indexed 2020 Affordability Percentage

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released the indexed affordability percentage of 9.78% for plan years beginning in 2020. An employer uses the affordability percentage to determine whether it has offered affordable coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s employer shared responsibility provisions to avoid Penalty B.

Read more about the affordability percentage.

USPSTF Issues a Final Recommendation Giving PrEP an “A” Rating

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) published a final recommendation that gives an “A” rating to preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) treatment. This means that the USPSTF recommends offering PrEP with effective antiretroviral therapy to people at high risk of HIV acquisition.

Group health plans and insurers subject to the preventive services coverage mandate must provide coverage for evidence-based items or services with an A or B rating recommended by the USPSTF without imposing copayments, coinsurance, deductibles, or other cost-sharing requirements when delivered by in-network providers. Group health plans and insurers subject to the preventive services coverage mandate generally must cover preventive services that are recommended by the USPSTF one year after the recommendation is issued.

HHS Releases Updated Notice Requirements for the HHS Federal External Review Process

On July 12, 2019, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released updated requirements for notices that self-insured non-federal governmental health plans and health insurance issuers – using the HHS-administered federal external review process – must provide to their plan participants and beneficiaries.

District Court Upholds Short-Term Limited Duration Insurance Final Rule

As background, on August 1, 2018, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Department of Labor (DOL) (collectively, the Departments) released a final rule that amended the definition of short-term, limited-duration insurance (STLDI). HHS also released a fact sheet on the final rule. The final rule allows consumers to purchase STLDI policies that are less than 12 months in length and may be renewed for up to 36 months.

On July 18, 2019 the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia (court) upheld the STLDI final rule. The court found that the final rule did not exceed the regulatory authority that Congress delegated to the Departments to define STDLI as a category of insurance that is exempt from individual insurance regulations. Employers should keep apprised of potential future developments as the case may be appealed.

Read more about the STDLI final rule.

Recent Litigation on the Contraceptive Coverage Exemption Rules

As background, the Department of the Treasury (Treasury), Department of Labor (DOL), and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) (collectively, the Departments) published two final rules on November 15, 2018, regarding contraceptive coverage exemptions, to be effective on January 14, 2019. On January 14, 2019, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania Court) granted a nationwide preliminary injunction that prohibits the implementation of the two final rules.

On July 12, 2019, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals (appeals court) affirmed the Pennsylvania Court’s preliminary injunction that prohibits the two final rules’ enforcement nationwide. The appeals court found that, until the final rules’ legality is decided, the injunction will allow states to avoid the imminent financial burden of subsidizing contraceptive services, providing funds for medical care associated with unintended pregnancies, and absorbing medical expenses that arise from decreased use of contraceptive medications for other health conditions.

The appeals court decision means that the Departments are prohibited from implementing and enforcing both final rules nationwide.

Read more about the status of the ACA contraceptive coverage mandate and exemption.

DOL Releases Advisory Opinion on AHPs and MEWAs

The Department of Labor (DOL) released an advisory opinion that analyzed a large retailer’s proposed group health plan to determine that the plan would be an association health plan (AHP) and a multiple employer welfare arrangement (MEWA) under ERISA. Although the advisory opinion can only be relied on by the retailer who requested it, the opinion gives employers an overview of the criteria that the DOL reviews when determining whether a plan fits the AHP definition that existed before the DOL’s 2018 AHP final rule. The opinion also provides a summary of the criteria that the DOL reviews when determining whether an arrangement is a MEWA.

Read more about AHPs.

Status of Court Case Challenging ACA Constitutionality

As background, in February 2018, twenty states filed a lawsuit asking the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas (Court) to strike down the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) entirely. The lawsuit came after the U.S. Congress passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in December 2017 that reduced the individual mandate penalty to $0, starting in 2019.

On December 14, 2018, the Court issued a declaratory order that the individual mandate is unconstitutional and that the rest of the ACA is unconstitutional. The Court granted a stay of its December 2018 order, which prohibits the order from taking effect while it is being appealed in the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals (appeals court).

On July 3, 2019, the Department of Justice filed its supplemental brief to assert that the court decision striking down the ACA should not apply beyond the 18 plaintiff states. On July 9, 2019, the appeals court held oral arguments.

HHS and FDA Release Safe Importation Action Plan

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Safe Importation Action Plan that overviews two pathways that could permit drug importation from foreign countries. HHS also issued a press release.

Under the first pathway, HHS would propose rules to allow states, wholesalers, and pharmacists to submit demonstration project plans designed to: import Canadian-approved drugs that are versions of FDA-approved drugs; meet certain conditions such as drug quality, record keeping, testing, and protections against counterfeiting; and significantly reduce consumer drug cost.

Under the second pathway, manufacturers of FDA-approved drugs could import versions of FDA-approved drugs that they sell in foreign countries, if they establish with the FDA that the foreign version is the same as the U.S. version.

Question of the Month

Q: What if a plan sponsor fails to file or pay the PCORI fee?

A: Although the PCORI statute and its regulations do not include a specific penalty for failure to report or pay the PCORI fee, the plan sponsor may be subject to penalties for failure to file a tax return because the PCORI fee is an excise tax.

A plan sponsor should consult with its attorney on how to proceed with a late filing or late payment of the PCORI fee. The PCORI regulations note that the penalties related to late filing of Form 720 or late payment of the fee may be waived or abated if the plan sponsor had reasonable cause and the failure was not due to willful neglect.

If a plan sponsor already filed Form 720 (for example, for a different excise tax), then the plan sponsor can make a correction to a previously filed Form 720 by using Form 720X.

8/1/2019


The “Official” Lowdown on Physical Activity

Are you looking for wellness tips and information on staying active? The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans is the official voice of authority when it comes to physical activity and health. Continue reading this blog post for guidelines and recommendations from the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.


You can read fitness magazines or online blogs, get tips from friends and neighbors, or make up your own rules and regimens for staying active. But when the federal government speaks, you should probably listen.

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans is the voice of authority when it comes to physical activity and health. The guidelines are based on scientific evidence and provide recommendations for Americans of all ages. The second edition of these guidelines came out in 2018 and includes some intriguing facts:

  • About half of all American adults have at least one chronic disease.
  • Seventy percent of the most common of these diseases can be improved by physical activity.
  • A full 80 percent of adults aren’t getting the aerobic and muscle-strengthening activity recommended.
  • This lack of activity has been linked to 10 percent of premature deaths.

Yikes! Not good, right? If this gets your attention and you’d like to up your activity level, here are the top recommendations from the guide:

  • Kids ages 3 - 5 should be active at least 3 hours a day.
  • Kids 6 - 17 should strive for at least an hour of moderate to vigorous activity per day. This should include aerobic activity (anything that speeds up heart rate) and muscle-strengthening activities. This activity has been shown to help with things like bone health, heart health and even learning.
  • Adults need at least 150 to 300 minutes of moderate-intensity activity per week and at least two days of muscle-strengthening activity (lifting weights, push-ups). Physical activity brings immediate health benefits, like lowering blood pressure and improving sleep. Over time, physical activity can lower the risk of heart disease, diabetes, dementia, weight gain, and eight different cancers, among other health risks. It also helps improve overall quality of life.
  • For people who already have a health condition, physical activity can help with pain, slow the disease’s progress, keep depression and anxiety at bay, and improve brain function for people with Alzheimer’s disease, MS, Parkinson’s, and other conditions.

When it comes to government, you might not like everything you hear and read. But for the real scoop on activity levels and health, our friends in Washington seem to know what’s best. Remember, any activity is better than none, so get out of your chair, step away from your desk, or otherwise get moving!

Source: Health.gov. Physical activity guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition. health.gov/paguidelines/second-edition/10things (Accessed 6/20/19)

SOURCE: Olson, B. (14th August, 2019). "The “Official” Lowdown on Physical Activity" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from: http://blog.ubabenefits.com/lowdown-on-physical-activity


Mastering Healthcare Cost Transparency Within Your Self-Funded Benefits Plan

Finding high-value healthcare providers for your employees is a constant struggle. After interviewing our Executive Vice President, Scott Smeaton, he gave us insight on a strategy for conquering cost transparency while maintaining quality care.

Working with Hierl Insurance for over 24 years, Scott shared how his endeavors working with selffunded plans has led him to believe the best strategy is one that starts at the employee-level.

Filling the Transparency Gap

First, let’s define what a high-value healthcare provider is: A high-value provider is a physician and / or facility that consistently demonstrates better patient outcomes at a lower than average cost. This is accomplished by meeting the highest quality standards i.e. low infection and readmission rates, quicker recovery rates, and high patient satisfaction scores, among others, at a lower than average cost.

These high value providers perform more procedures (volume) in facilities where they have greater control of the outcome (low overhead, low infection rates), and often provide “bundled” pricing where the patient knows how much the procedure will cost before the work is ever done.

Have you, in the last year, bought a big-ticket item without knowing the cost? This is the question Scott starts with when speaking to a company’s employees. Often, no one can raise their hand. Why? Historically, the information hasn’t been available. As an industry, we still have a ways to go. We’re moving in the right direction, working with innovative partners focusing on what patients need to make better healthcare decisions.

As a society, it’s common sense – whether you’re buying a car, a TV, or a house – to do some research as to the quality and cost of a product or service. “That ability to access those numbers and identify cost and quality measures has not been available in healthcare,” Scott explained. This gap is beginning to be filled, though primarily in direct-to-provider contracting exclusive to certain specialties.

Because healthcare information can be overwhelming, businesses struggle to find the most appropriate venue for sourcing the lowest costs without relinquishing the highest quality of care.

“We’ve found that the lower cost providers actually have higher quality of care due to the volume of services they offer,” Scott explained. Hierl partners with third parties to identify these providers. “A great example is an orthopedic specialist we work with. They have finetuned their procedures and their processes so much that they receive the highest quality ratings, yet they are the lowest cost providers, in their area. They tell you what it’s going to cost with a bundled price, before the procedure is performed,” Scott mentioned.

Hierl partners directly with high value providers, designing employee benefits programs that offer incentives to employees who use those providers. When buying big-ticket items like a car, it’s often reasonable to assume the more the car costs, the higher quality and value you are going to get from it. In healthcare, it’s essentially the opposite. Take Lasik Surgery, for example. Fifteen years ago, Radial Keratotomy (RK), which was a precursor to LASIK, was performed with a scalpel by a surgeon and cost roughly $8,000. In 2017, the average cost of LASIK was $2,088. Now, the procedure is much more effective due to improved technology.

With high value providers, such as the orthopedic specialist mentioned previously, that “high value” comes from the fact they are typically operating in freestanding clinics and surgery centers. This means there is lower overhead compared to being in a hospital setting, and they are run by specialized teams that can give their patients more attention. “High volume of services, low overhead costs, and high-quality care – those are the key ingredients we look for in the providers we recommend to our clients,” explained Scott.

Flexibility in Cost Transparency Begins with Self-Funding

Perks such as gym memberships and free lunches have become common practice for companies looking to brand themselves as a great employer. However, it is important to understand these tactics aren’t the answer when it comes to employee experience but rather an engagement strategy. Modern employees want to work in a great environment and want to know their contributions are valued through benefit offerings like discounted healthcare.

For anyone looking to unlock the power of employee engagement through benefits, the time to act is now. With the number of companies catching on to the importance of customer experience, it will not only help you gain an edge on your competition but make your company a favorable place to work – the definition of a ‘win-win’ .

The plans that get the most value from this third-party vendor initiative are self-funded plans, due to their flexibility. “That’s not to say we can’t work with fully insured companies,” Scott insisted. “We have found being self-funded really allows the employer to access the ‘cream of the crop’ or the third-tier beyond typical in-network and out-network providers and facilities, which are those high value specialists.” Aiding employer and employee education through third-party care coordinators and plan incentives, Hierl’s benefits plans are next-level.

We give businesses focus and control over their healthcare expenditures. When it comes to shop-able services, or nonemergency services needed, our care coordinators will ensure you partner with the best high value, low cost provider possible. Scott emphasized, “We are a pilot of health plan partners – a conductor of sorts, pulling all the moving pieces and parts together for our clients to guarantee a more focused, transparent result of their healthcare spending.”

To speak with Scott, contact him today at (920) 921-5921 or by email at ssmeaton@hierl.com.


USPSTF Issues a Final Recommendation Giving PrEP an “A” Rating

Recently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) published a final recommendation, giving an "A" rating to preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) treatment. Read this blog post from UBA to learn what this final recommendation means.


The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) published a final recommendation that gives an “A” rating to preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) treatment. This means that the USPSTF recommends offering PrEP with effective antiretroviral therapy to people at high risk of HIV acquisition.

Group health plans and insurers subject to the preventive services coverage mandate must provide coverage for evidence-based items or services with an A or B rating recommended by the USPSTF without imposing copayments, coinsurance, deductibles, or other cost-sharing requirements when delivered by in-network providers. Group health plans and insurers subject to the preventive services coverage mandate generally must cover preventive services that are recommended by the USPSTF one year after the recommendation is issued.

SOURCE: Hsu, K. (14 August 2019). "USPSTF Issues a Final Recommendation Giving PrEp an 'A' Rating" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from: http://blog.ubabenefits.com/uspstf-issues-a-final-recommendation-giving-prep-an-a-rating


Tailoring Benefits Plans

Are there benefits to creating customized benefits plans? New studies are showing multiple benefits to tailoring to employee's specific needs. Keep reading the blog post to learn more. Read more


Keeping It Real

Keeping it real in human resources now involves avoiding "deepfakes". What used to be rare technology used is now spreading and could potentially harm employers.

Blame Forrest Gump. The 1994 movie used new technology to edit Gump's character into scenes to make it seem like he talked with John F. Kennedy or sat next to John Lennon — an editing magician's trick that won the film accolades.

That technology has evolved into what is now referred to as "deepfake" technology: a mix of AI and machine learning that allows users to alter videos, audios, and photos in powerful ways.

One deepfake example: A widely-shared video of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi that was doctored to slow down the speed of her speech, creating the impression Pelosi was impaired. Deepfakes can make it seem that someone is saying something or doing something they may never have — and that can create a new kind of security woe for employers of all types.

Just because deepfakes haven't showed up at your company doesn't mean they'll stay away forever, Randy Barr, chief information security officer for Topia, a global mobility management software company, told HR Dive; "We're going to start to see a lot more than this as soon as technology is readily available for people to use and try."

What can HR do now to ensure employees are safe?

It's all fun and photoshop until someone gets hurt

Deepfake technology can have positive purposes, such as in the creation of digital voices for those who have lost the ability to speak, or the David Beckham video that shows him explaining how people can protect themselves from malaria, using deepfake tech to look like he's speaking in nine different languages.

But unlike the altered content from Forrest Gump and Instagram filters, the audience isn't supposed to know that the deepfakes are manipulated pieces.

On top of that, the technology is often used explicitly to create trouble, Niraj Swami, CEO of SCAD AI, an AI consultancy, told HR Dive"It stems from leveraging controversial material…offensive content or offensive perspectives," he said. When this material pops up in social media, it creates media confusion, he said, and many viewers react emotionally to the false information.

Some deepfake videos can be identified relatively easily, Barr said. "One of the simple ways of detecting it is if you look at the video, see how often that individual blinks, because [with] the current AI technology and deepfake, it's hard to impose the face over a body if the eyes are closed," he said. Other tips are to look for a mismatch in skin tone, and placement of the eyebrows and chin, he added.

Just as deepfake technology is becoming more sophisticated, so is the technology used to identify altered media, with improvements on both sides expected to continue.

How deepfakes can harm employers

Although most deepfakes thus far have targeted politicians and celebrities, the technology has been seen in the work environment — and it may be used with increasing frequency, experts said.

Imagine a CEO placing an urgent call to a senior financial officer requesting an emergency money transfer — except the CEO's voice was deepfaked by criminals, as Axios reported happening to a number of companies already. Deepfakes could be used to attack a company, Barr said; "[It] could be the evolution of how ransomware takes place."

Remote employees could use deepfake tech to disguise their identities and hand off work to subcontractors, Swami said. This could be concerning if the subcontractor is not supposed to be offshore or if the initial employee had a security clearance, but the subcontractor does not, he said.

For HR leaders, deepfakes could lead to tricky situations, Forman said. What happens if an employee finds an altered photo or video of them on social media that uses their company ID or picture? What obligation does the organization have to investigate? "It's becoming more difficult. You have workplace morale issues, compliance issues with your policy and procedures that all jump up because of deepfakes," he said.

Guarding against deepfakes

HR leaders are used to discerning fake information, from exaggerations on a resume to doctored emails, but as technology improves, it becomes more challenging to anticipate potential issues. While HR is not expected to analyze media for alterations, leaders can take steps to protect employees and the company from being manipulated by deepfakes.

Review company technology policies, said Forman. New technologies up the ante for the workplace and the employer and employee relationships because of the increased risk for misconduct, he said. An employer may want to take an existing policy regarding anti-harassment, anti-retaliation, and anti-discrimination, and make sure the guidelines address the new technology, he added.

Companies should decide how they would respond if a deepfake incident occurred, Forman advised. Although there may be no one right or wrong answer, being prepared to react to the threat is necessary.

"The biggest thing is awareness," Swami said. If employers see an incendiary video, they can't have a knee jerk reaction if it is presented as evidence of wrong-doing, he said. Managers might not be able to believe their eyes, so employers may need to ensure its managers gather more information. "You can't have a single source of truth."

SOURCE: DeLoatch, Pamela. (5 August 2019). "Keeping it real: What HR leaders need to know about deepfakes" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from: https://www.hrdive.com/news/keeping-it-real-what-hr-leaders-need-to-know-about-deepfakes/559475/

 


Pennie's Heartwarming Banana Bread

Welcome to our monthly Dish segment. This month, we asked Pennie Hildebrant to provide us with her favorite Dine In and Dine Out choices. Check them out below and let us know if you give them a try!

A Little Bit About Pennie

Pennie is the current Property & Casualty Client Services representative at Hierl Insurance.

Pennie has been with Hierl for more the 24 years and is a CIC (Certified Insurance Counselor) and CIRS (Certified Insurance Service Representative) in the Property & Casualty department.

During her free time, Pennie enjoys boating in spring and summer and during the fall, loves hopping on the back of her motorcycle for colorful rides. She also enjoys traveling and enjoys spending time after work gardening and hanging out with friends. Pennie has two children.

Learn more about Pennie. 


Heart-Warming & Homemade Banana Bread

“This is an all time favorite that makes everyone smile.” -Pennie

Ingredients

  • 2 Cups Flour
  • 1 Cup Sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 ripe bananas
  • 2 stick of margarine or butter ( melted)
  • 8 TBL cold water
  • 2 eggs

Directions

  1. Mix dry ingredients.
  2. Mix in remaining ingredients except for the eggs.
  3. Mix in egg yolks to batter and beat egg whites.  Fold egg whites.
  4. Place in greased loaf pan.  Bake a 350 degrees for an hour or until toothpick comes out clean.


Pennie loves to dine out at Blanck’s Lake Aire in Fond du Lac. One of her favorite dishes at Blanck’s is the baked haddock along with their amazing salad bar.

Get more about Blanck’s Lake Aire on the restaurant’s website.

Check out their menu.

Blanck’s Lake Aire is rated 3.5 stars on Trip Advisor.

Thank-you for joining us for this month’s Dish! Don’t forget to come back next month for a new one.


Up-Leveling Your HR Team

Human Resources can at times be a department that is looked over. However, this is a crucial department in any workplace and one that is constantly evolving. Keep reading to find out how you can up-level your team.Read more