Trucking Risk Advisor - July 2019

How Canada’s New ELD Rules Affect U.S. Companies

The Government of Canada announced its new electronic logging device (ELD) rule June 13, 2019. Canada’s rules and regulations regarding ELDs are largely similar to the United States’ standards, but there are a few differences that could affect U.S.-based companies that send their drivers north of the border.

Canada’s mandate includes a provision that ELDs are required to be certified by a third-party group. In other words, ELD vendors cannot certify their own products. According to industry experts, some devices introduced under U.S. standards have been shown to be prone to tampering, such as allowing drivers to falsify statistics like hours spent behind the wheel.

Requiring certification from a third-party will mean that U.S.-based companies whose drivers cross the border will need to have their devices approved in Canada. If a company’s ELD provider chooses not to go through the third-party certification process, the company will have to switch to a different manufacturer that is willing to do so.

Accommodating the new rules in Canada could be as simple as a software update to existing devices, although industry experts noted that some companies could start having to use two separate ELDs in the same vehicle in order to meet both U.S. and Canadian standards.

Canada’s mandate also includes a hard deadline. The United States adopted its ELD rules in 2017 but has allowed for a transition period during which companies can continue to use less advanced automatic onboard recording devices (AOBRDs) until December 2019. Canada’s rules demand fully compliant devices by the June 12, 2021, deadline.

To read the full mandate, click here. Hierl Insurance Inc. will provide any relevant updates as they are announced.

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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Commercial Risk Advisor - July 2019

Lightning Safety for Outdoor Workers

Although about 90 percent of people struck by lightning survive, these strikes can cause serious and permanent disabilities. And, even if employees aren’t hurt by lightning, they may be at risk from any fires, explosions or other hazards that result from a strike. Together, these facts outline the importance of protecting employees who work outdoors from lightning hazards.

There are a number of ways to do this, including taking steps to reduce lightning hazards, creating an emergency action plan and training your workforce.

All of your managers, supervisors and outdoor workers should collaborate on your plan to ensure it accounts for your business’s unique operations.

Consider these tips when you’re drafting your plan:

  • Train all employees on lightning safety, including early warning systems for severe weather and the best locations to take shelter when working outdoors.
  • Post information on lightning safety around all of your outdoor work areas. These postings should indicate the location of safe shelters, when to stop and resume work after hearing thunder, and any other guidance that applies to your business or work sites.
  • Make sure employees check weather reports before working outside. Employees should also check the weather at each work site they’ll be visiting each day, as weather patterns can vary widely—even over short distances.
  • Require employees and supervisors to monitor weather reports regularly once they’re at an outdoor work site. Have employees stop work and seek shelter immediately if they hear any thunder.

For more resources to help keep your outdoor workers safe, contact Hierl Insurance Inc. today.

Direct costs of MSDs can be as high as $20 billion a year, with indirect costs (e.g. lost productivity and absenteeism) costing employers five times more.

The Importance of Ergonomics in the Workplace

Ergonomics is a catch-all term that often comes up in discussions about workplace health, safety and design—and for good reason. Employers who fail to implement ergonomic solutions at their place of business put their employees at risk of serious injuries.

When your employees perform tasks under the stress of an awkward posture, extreme temperature or repeated movement, their entire musculoskeletal system can be affected. This can lead to adverse symptoms like fatigue, discomfort and pain, which are the first signs of a musculoskeletal disorder (MSD).

MSDs are conditions that affect muscles, joints, tendons, ligaments and nerves. These conditions can develop over time or occur immediately when workers overload themselves. Direct costs of MSDs can be as high as $20 billion a year, with indirect costs (e.g., lost productivity and absenteeism) costing employers five times more.

Ensuring workstations and tasks are designed with ergonomics in mind does more than promote productivity. When employers invest in ergonomic workplaces, it:

  • Saves organizations money by reducing absenteeism, injuries and workers’ compensation claims
  • Creates happier employees, as workers feel valued when employers take steps to create a safe workplace
  • Contributes to employees’ long-term health and quality of life

While ergonomics can mean different things depending on the industry you operate in, the goal is the same: identify the ergonomics-related risks in your workplace and take steps to protect employees. This can be accomplished by establishing an ergonomics program.

An ergonomics program is systematic process for identifying, analyzing and controlling workplace risk factors, often created with the goal of reducing MSDs. In order to address ergonomics-related concerns, your program needs to identify the most common risk factors present in your workplace.

Although about 90 percent of people struck by lightning survive, these discharges can cause serious and permanent disabilities.

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Agriculture Risk Advisor - Third Quarter 2019

Pesticide Safety

Administering and working around pesticides is an important part of working in agriculture. However, while these products are very effective in protecting crops from pests, they can also cause health problems for those who are constantly exposed to them.

For example, results from a recent Michigan State University study found that workers exposed to high levels of pesticides are more likely to lose their sense of smell later in life. The study surveyed over 11,000 farm workers over a 20-year period as part of the Agricultural Health Study.

According to the study, 10% of workers reported that their sense of smell was impaired, either partially or completely, after being exposed to high levels of pesticides. However, those who washed with soap and water immediately after a high pesticide exposure event had a lower risk of impairment, with longer times between exposure and washing correlating to higher chances of impairment. This underscores the need for a quick response after an exposure event.

Other safety tips that should always be observed to protect from adverse health effects include the following:

  • Follow directions on the label for the attended use and application.
  • Note first-aid instructions in case of accidental poisoning.
  • Follow directions on the label for proper storage or disposal after use.
  • Do not smoke, eat, drink, apply cosmetics or use the washroom directly following the use of pesticides.
  • Do not use pesticides in winds stronger than 10 mph.

Additionally, wearing protective gear is one of the best lines of defense against exposure to chemicals. Long-sleeved shirts, long pants, nonabsorbent gloves, rubber boots, hats, eye protection, masks, aprons, face respirators and dust mist filters are all beneficial while applying pesticides. Clothing should also be checked beforehand for defects or holes that may allow pesticides to reach the wearer.

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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Target on Safety: Driver Fatigue

Fatigue is the result of physical or mental exertion that impairs performance. Driver fatigue may be due to a lack of adequate sleep, extended work hours, strenuous work or non-work activities, or a combination of other factors. The Large Truck Crash Causation Study (LTCCS) reported that 13 percent of Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) drivers were considered to have been fatigued at the time of their crash.

Below are some tips that will help you stay healthy and feel well rested during your time on the road.

Tip #1: Get Enough Sleep

Be sure to get an adequate amount of sleep each night. If possible, do not drive while your body is naturally drowsy, between the hours of 12 a.m. to 6 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Driver drowsiness may impair a driver’s response time to potential hazards, increasing the chances of being in a crash. If you do become drowsy while driving, choose a safe place to pull over and rest.

The circadian rhythm refers to the wake/sleep cycle that our body goes through each day and night. The cycle involves our internal clock and controls the daily pattern of alertness in a human body. With inadequate sleep, the drowsiness experienced during natural “lulls” can be even stronger and may have a greater adverse effect on a driver’s performance and alertness.

A study by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) found that driver alertness was related to “time-of-day” more so than “time-on-task.” Most people are less alert at night, especially after midnight. This drowsiness may be enhanced if you have been on the road for an extended period of time.

A recent study conducted to determine the risk of having a safety-critical event as a function of driving-hour suggests that incidents are highest during the first hour of driving. The authors hypothesize that drivers may be affected by sleep inertia shortly after waking from sleep. This may be especially true for drivers who sleep in the sleeper berth. Sleep inertia refers to impairment in a variety of performance tasks, including short-term memory, vigilance, cognitive functioning, reaction time and ability to resist sleep.

Tip #2: Maintain a Healthy Diet

Skipping meals or eating at irregular times may lead to fatigue and/or food cravings. Also, going to bed with an empty stomach or immediately after a heavy meal can interfere with sleep. A light snack before bed may help you achieve more restful sleep. Remember that if you are not well-rested, induced fatigue may cause slow reaction time, reduced attention, memory lapses, lack of awareness, mood changes, and reduced judgment ability.

A recent study conducted on the sleeping and driving habits of CMV drivers concluded that an unhealthy lifestyle, long working hours, and sleeping problems were the main causes of drivers falling asleep while driving.

Tip #3: Take a Nap

If possible, you should take a nap when feeling drowsy or less alert. Naps should last a minimum of 10 minutes, but ideally a nap should last up to 45 minutes. Allow at least 15 minutes after waking to fully recover before starting to drive.

Short naps are more effective at restoring energy levels than coffee. Naps aimed at preventing drowsiness are generally more effective in maintaining a driver’s performance than naps taken when a person is already drowsy.

Tip #4: Avoid Medication That May Induce Drowsiness

Avoid medications that may make you drowsy if you plan to get behind the wheel. Most drowsiness-inducing medications include a warning label indicating that you should not operate vehicles or machinery during use. Some of the most common medicines that may make you drowsy are: tranquilizers, sleeping pills, allergy medicines and cold medicines.

In a recent study, 17 percent of CMV drivers were reported as having “over-the-counter drug use” at the time of a crash. Cold pills are one of the most common medicines that may make you drowsy. If you must drive with a cold, it is safer to suffer from the cold than drive under the effects of the medicine.

Tip #5: Recognize the Signals and Dangers of Drowsiness

Pay attention. Indicators of drowsiness include frequent yawning, heavy eyes and blurred vision.

Research has indicated that being awake for 18 hours is comparable to having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 percent, which is legally intoxicated and leaves you at equal risk for a crash. A 2005 study suggests that three out of every four CMV drivers report having experienced at least one type of driving error as a result of drowsiness.

Tip #6: Do Not Rely on “Alertness Tricks” to Keep You Awake

Behaviors such as smoking, turning up the radio, drinking coffee, opening the window and other “alertness tricks” are not real cures for drowsiness and may give you a false sense of security.

Excessive intake of caffeine can cause insomnia, headaches, irritability and nervousness.  It takes several minutes for caffeine to get into your system and deliver the energy boost you need, so if you are already tired when you first drink a caffeinated drink, it may not take effect as quickly as you might expect. In addition, if you are a regular caffeine user, the effect may be much smaller. Rolling the window down or turning the radio up may help you feel more alert for an instant, but these are not effective ways to maintain an acceptable level of alertness.

Source: DOT/FMCSA CMV Driving Tips: Driver Fatigue