Student loan benefits more popular with workers than employers

"While a student loan benefit is the most-requested financial benefit, it’s only third on the priority list for HR professionals." Find out more in this article.

If you ask them, 78 percent of employees laboring under a load of student debt will tell you that they want their bosses to provide a student loan benefit that will help them dig out.

Bosses, not so much. While a student loan benefit is the most-requested financial benefit, according to an HRDive report, it’s only third on the priority list for HR professionals.

Related: The problem with student-loan repayment benefits

It’s not just younger workers who want it, either. The 78 percent of employees who wish their jobs came with a student loan benefit includes 65 percent of workers over age 55 who have problems with current or future loan debt.

The report points to a CommonBond study that finds student loan benefits not only help to keep employees on the payroll and even better their job performance, but they also help in recruiting new talent. The study finds that 75 percent of all workers have paid for their own education via student loans, and 21 percent plan to take out student loans for a child or another family member in the next five years.

Oh, and another disconnect between boss and worker: while 75 percent of HR executives think their benefits offerings are innovative, only 50 percent of workers agree.

Money, of course, is a big worry for workers—and it’s not all about salary, with 44 million Americans weighed down by some $1.4 trillion in student debt. Worrying about lingering student loans also cuts productivity at work, in addition to subjecting workers to increasing stress, so it’s really an employer’s problem too.
Not only do students owe an average of more than $25,000 by graduation, figures from The Student Loan Report indicate that the loan default rate and delinquency rates are more than 10 percent and 5 percent, respectively—not exactly conducive to either peace of mind or high productivity at work. So employers are increasingly getting involved, considering tuition payment programs for employees who want to pursue a degree or add new skills.

And that can help both groups as employers become increasingly desperate for a more skilled employee base. It also helps employers as employee stress falls, potentially cutting health care costs as well and making workers more productive.

Source:
Satter M. (7 May 2018). "Student loan benefits more popular with workers than employers" [web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://bit.ly/2wi9yA0


April 2018 Safety Matters: Elevator Best Practices

Elevator Best Practices

Millions of employees use elevators each day at work. While elevators are considered one of the safest forms of transportation, it is important to follow best practices and safety precautions when using an elevator.

Boarding the Elevator

Take note of the following procedures for entering an elevator:

  • Make sure you are aware of the risks associated with riding the elevator prior to boarding, such as falls and accidents.
  • Allow all passengers to fully exit the elevator before you begin boarding.
  • Watch your step when entering the elevator, as it may not be exactly level to the floor.
  • Steer clear of the doors once you enter the elevator. Keep all clothes, carry-ons and body parts within the car. Never attempt to stop a closing door.
  • Pay attention to the elevator’s capacity limit. Do not attempt to board an elevator that has reached capacity.

Riding the Elevator

Keep in mind the following procedures for riding an elevator:

  • Stand as close to the elevator wall as possible. Be sure to leave as much room as possible for others.
  • Pay close attention to floor indications and transitions to ensure you are able to exit at the right time.
  • Press the “door open” button in the event of the elevator stopping on a floor without opening its doors.
  • Be courteous of other passengers on the elevator. Do not push other riders in front of you when exiting and be sure to move out of the way of passengers when they exit the elevator.

Watch your step as you exit to avoid tripping on uneven ground.

In Case of Emergency

Although rare, elevator accidents and malfunctions do happen. Keep in mind the following procedures in the event of an elevator emergency:

  • Never use an elevator in the event of a fire. Always take the stairs.
  • Remain calm at all times. If you are in a stalled elevator, utilize the alarm button or phone button to contact emergency services.
  • Reassure those who are panicked in the situation. Remind everyone that they are safe inside the elevator.
  • Do not engage in horseplay.
  • Do not try to exit the elevator or pry open the doors. Always wait for trained professionals to arrive.

While elevators are considered one of the safest forms of transportation, it is important to encourage best practices and safety precautions to all employees or building occupants that frequent the elevator.

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RISK INSIGHTS: April 2018

The #MeToo movement.

The #MeToo movement has spread across the globe since gaining traction in Hollywood, and small business owners should see it as a wake-up call for preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Small Businesses Most Vulnerable to Sexual Harassment Claims

In wake of the #MeToo movement, awareness of sexual harassment has increased, but not necessarily at small businesses. Unlike their larger counterparts, small businesses are more vulnerable to sexual harassment claims because they’re less likely to have formal workplace policies in place.

According to the CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey of more than 2,000 small business owners, only half of businesses with 5-49 employees had formal sexual harassment policies in place. That number decreased to 39 percent at businesses with less than five employees. That’s a stark contrast to businesses with 50 or more employees, as 85 percent said they had formal sexual harassment policies in place.

Eleven percent of the businesses surveyed said they issued companywide reminders of their sexual harassment policies and reporting procedures as a result of the #MeToo movement and other high-profile sexual harassment accusations. Nine percent said they’ve reviewed policies regarding diversity and gender equality. Seven percent have required new or additional training, and 4 percent have issued new reporting procedures. However, 61 percent of all businesses surveyed did not take any of the above precautions.

Role of HR

Complicating matters for small businesses is that two-thirds of those surveyed lacked an official human resources professional, meaning that the business owner was responsible for handling any harassment claims.

Only 3 percent said it was the job of human resources personnel to handle harassment issues and 10 percent said they had no specified way to handle harassment at all. Without a designated, unbiased person to speak to about harassment, employees may be afraid to report it for fear of retaliation.

Protect Your Business

A lack of a formal policy and procedures for handling sexual harassment in the workplace doesn’t mean that a business owner is exempt from liability. Although federal law exempts small businesses with less than 15 employees from the requirement to have a sexual harassment policy, it’s in their best interest to establish one.

Other than the fact that state laws may have smaller thresholds for requiring a formal policy, the financial and reputational costs are too high to risk running a business without one.

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Commercial Risk Advisor - April 2018

Insurance carriers, courts and regulatory agencies will begin to examine businesses closely to ensure that they take sexual harassment seriously and take steps to protect their employees and customers.

It’s always been important to protect your business and employees from sexual harassment, but recent high-profile cases show the importance of re-examining this topic at your business. Social movements such as the “Me Too” campaign have drawn attention to sexual harassment in the workplace, resulting in a growing number of misconduct allegations. These allegations can result in a wide variety of claims and lead to serious financial and reputational damage.

Insurance carriers, courts and regulatory agencies will begin to examine businesses closely to ensure that they take sexual harassment seriously and act to protect their employees and customers.

3 Questions to Ask When Addressing Sexual Harassment at Your Business:

How do you encourage employees to report inappropriate conduct?

The best way to address sexual harassment allegations is to respond quickly. Employees should be regularly reminded that there won’t be any retaliation for reporting inappropriate behavior. You should also ensure that there are multiple ways for employees to make anonymous reports to management.

Does your employee harassment training address your workplace’s unique traits?

A standard workplace policy is a good starting point for addressing sexual harassment, but you should also think about how your employees interact with co-workers and customers.

Do your insurance policies include exclusions for sexual harassment?

Many commercial general liability policies exclude claims for sexual harassment. Although employment practices liability insurance can provide you with coverage, you also need to ensure that policy periods offer coverage throughout the statute of limitations in your area.

1 in 8 drivers are uninsured and liable for damage and medical bills, according to a new study.

Even if you don't use commercial vehicles, employees who use their personal vehicles for any kind of business-related task can put you at risk:

25% of all vehicles in the United States are used for business in some way.
The average uninsured motorist claim is almost $20,000
Most personal auto policies don't provide coverage for uninsured or underinsured drivers without an endorsement.

Uninsured drivers cause about 1 out of every 8 accidents.

3 Defensive Driving Tips That Could Save Your Life

Many jobs require employees to drive a company vehicle. While most drivers are cautious and attentive, accidents can occur without warning—even if the operator has years of experience.

When accidents happen, it can be incredibly costly for employers. What’s more, just one accident can cost employees their job or lead to serious, debilitating injuries.

One way to stay safe while you’re on the road for a job is through defensive driving. Being a defensive driver means driving to prevent accidents in spite of the actions of others or the presence of adverse driving conditions.

To avoid accidents through the use of defensive driving, do the following:

  • Remain on the lookout for hazards. Think about what may happen as far ahead of you as possible, and never assume that road hazards will resolve themselves before you reach them.
  • Understand the defense. Review potentially hazardous situations in your mind after you see them. This will allow you to formulate a reaction that will prevent an accident.
  • Act quickly. Once you see a hazard and decide upon a defense, you must act immediately. The sooner you act, the more time you will have to avoid a potentially dangerous situation.

Defensive driving requires the knowledge and strict observance of all traffic rules and regulations applicable to the area you are driving in. It also means that you should be alert for illegal actions and driving errors made by others and be willing to make timely adjustments to your own driving to avoid an accident.

Keeping in mind the above tips will not only keep you safe on the job, but in your personal life as well.

Poor indoor air quality can cause chronic headaches, allergies, fatigue and irritation of the lungs, among other symptoms.

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Safety Focused Newsletter - April 2018

How Indoor Air Quality Affects Health

Indoor air quality (IAQ) has a direct impact on your health, comfort, well-being and productivity. Poor IAQ can cause chronic headaches, allergies, fatigue and irritation of the lungs, among other symptoms.

What’s more, when IAQ is poor, it can have a direct effect on your productivity. If you are worried about the IAQ at your workplace, watch out for these symptoms:

  • Dryness or irritation of the eyes, nose, throat and lungs
  • Shortness of breath and fatigue
  • Nausea, headaches and dizziness
  • Chronic coughing and sneezing

If you suspect you are suffering from the effects of poor IAQ at your workplace, keep track of your symptoms and speak with your manager. As with many occupational illnesses, individuals may be affected differently.

If you are experiencing symptoms that your co-workers aren’t, that doesn’t mean an IAQ problem doesn’t exist and it’s still important to notify your employer. If your symptoms persist, consider speaking to a qualified medical professional.

3 Defensive Driving Tips That Could Save Your Life

Many jobs require employees to drive a company vehicle. While most drivers are cautious and attentive, accidents can occur without warning—even if the operator has years of experience.

When accidents happen, it can be incredibly costly for employers. What’s more, just one accident can cost employees their job or lead to serious, debilitating injuries.

One way to stay safe while you’re on the road for a job is through defensive driving. Being a defensive driver means driving to prevent accidents in spite of the actions of others or the presence of adverse driving conditions.

To avoid accidents through the use of defensive driving, do the following:

  • Remain on the lookout for hazards. Think about what may happen as far ahead of you as possible, and never assume that road hazards will resolve themselves before you reach them.
  • Understand the defense. Review potentially hazardous situations in your mind after you see them. This will allow you to formulate a reaction that will prevent an accident.
  • Act quickly. Once you see a hazard and decide upon a defense, you must act immediately. The sooner you act, the more time you will have to avoid a potentially dangerous situation.

Defensive driving requires the knowledge and strict observance of all traffic rules and regulations applicable to the area you are driving in. It also means that you should be alert for illegal actions and driving errors made by others and be willing to make timely adjustments to your own driving to avoid an accident.

Keeping in mind the above tips will not only keep you safe on the job, but in your personal life as well.

4 Tips for Safe Driving:

Avoid Distractions.

Be Alert.

Keep a Safe Distance.

Don't Speed.

Poor indoor air quality can cause chronic headaches, allergies, fatigue and irritation of the lungs, among other symptoms.

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Organization for Your Business: Top Tips for Corporate HR

 

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How to Address Operational Challenges of Your Organization With Enterprise Mobility

Large-scale enterprises have a few things in common. A large enterprise has its business footprint across geographies. It employs a workforce representing diverse cultures, languages, and age groups and complies with numerous local laws. The complexities multiply when an enterprise has to manage multiple business units, branches, and teams. Taking speedy decisions gets difficult for CIOs due to the sheer size and complexity of the enterprise. A slight miscalculation or business IT alignment (BITA) misstep results in adverse, enterprise-wide impact, financial losses, and reputation damage. Today's enterprises have to tackle some new difficulties too. Your organisation, perhaps, is no exception.

Difficulties range from changing regulatory environment, disruptive competition from start-ups, and rising expectations of the digitally empowered consumers. Given these realities, the only way an enterprise can take these challenges head-on is by embracing digitalisation. The advancements in technology have mandated that companies have 'digital' in their business DNA. For instance, mobility, one of the key pillars of digitalisation, can be harnessed to achieve productivity and efficiency goals while delivering a seamless user experience. A few forward-thinking organisations have succeeded in delivering great user experience by making their internal-only processes available to customers.

The self-service portals by financial services and e-commerce players, for instance, provide a wider choice to customers and also reduce the operational strain on these organisations. Let's explore how digitalisation can yield greater operational efficiencies. One time-consuming activity commonly found across departments of a large enterprise is report generation. From accounts to HR to sales to warehousing to manufacturing-nobody loves it but does it, nevertheless. Report generation hampers productivity and clogs network bandwidth-these reports are shared with everyone as email attachments. At another level, it also makes life difficult for the analytics teams who have to make sense of massive unstructured data.

Providing relevant and well-designed app dashboards to every person may nullify these issues in one clean swipe. Sharing reports can merely be app based comments without having to send email attachments. The organisation can accrue huge time savings and free up its valuable resources for productive assignments. The corporate HR is supposed to play an empowering role. However, burdened by operational difficulties, the HR often struggles to turn its programmes effective. Take an example of on-boarding of new recruits and induction training. Given the multi-geographic nature of a large organisation, it is challenging (and expensive) to conduct onboarding and training sessions across time zones and locations. Ensuring that every new recruit attends these sessions is another challenge. Measuring the effectiveness of training-whether the employee has fully grasped the training content or not-is yet another difficulty. With the help of a modern, container app architecture, you can address these issues effectively.

—entrepreneur.com


Is Ergonomics A "Must-Have" For Your Workplace Wellness Plan?

 

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Workplace wellness in most organizations centres around health promotion activity or policy development to support healthy behaviour and improve health outcomes in the workplace. A "workplace wellness" Google search reveals a range of programs focused on fitness, weight management, smoking cessation, stress management, work-life balance and occasionally flexible work scheduling. These are legitimately important aspects targeted at improving specific health outcomes.

It is important to realize that the average office worker spends over 65 per cent of their time at work in a sedentary seated position. No doubt you have seen the media campaigns touting the health concerns related to sedentary behaviour, some going as far as labelling sitting as the new smoking. Prolonged sitting has been associated with cardiovascular problems, increases in musculoskeletal discomfort, and decreases in concentration and productivity. Improper sitting and work station setup has been associated with an increase in musculoskeletal pain and injury (MSI) in the neck, shoulders, arms, wrists, legs and lower back. MSI are associated with the wear and tear on the muscles, tissues, ligaments and joints of the body.

It is for these reasons that office ergonomics should be on the workplace wellness program menu. Ergonomics is the science of matching the work to the worker. In an office environment, a major focus would be insuring that employee workstations fit the worker – not the employee made to fit the workstation. To design a healthy employee work station properly requires an understanding of the limitations of the human body, especially in terms of muscle and soft tissue fatigue. Again, a Google search on "office ergonomics" leads you to resources on the proper configuration of computer workstations to promote a neutral sitting posture aimed at reducing muscle and soft tissue pain.

This is a great place to start, but does not replace the knowledge of an experienced ergonomist to ensure that individual limitations and pre-existing health conditions are accommodated for properly. Here are some examples of the most common office ergonomic challenges I encounter when consulting with organizations. The first is the desk. The working height of a standard desk is 30 inches, for which we expect it be comfortable for both the 5-foot-2-inch and a 6-foot-2-inch employee. But the reality is that this standard desk height is appropriate for the 6-foot-2-inch employee. The average female is 5-foot-4-inches, which would suggest that the standard 30-inch working height is too high for the majority of female workers in the office. When the working height is too high, the employee will adopt a posture where the wrists are extended when keyboarding, the neck is extended, shoulders are hunched and back is flexed forward off the chair.

—theglobeandmail.com


Boring Little Miracles

From SHRM, this article goes into the importance of "boring little miracles" in the workplace


The success of an organization is often borne on the backs of people performing boring little miracles.

Boring little miracles don’t make headlines. They, perhaps purposely so, fly under the radar, disguised as everyday tasks performed under pressure or work that doesn’t feel like much to the person performing it. People performing boring little miracles get the job done and then pack up and go home like it was no big deal.

But it IS a big deal.

Boring little miracles add up over time. They are the compounding interest of organizational productivity, and they are performed by people who invest early and often. These miracles sneak up on you and can quickly become the expectation rather than the exception.

Boring little miracles are still miracles.

They aren’t jobs or tasks that are easy, they just appear that way because of the person doing the work. Highly experienced and highly trained professionals doing what they do don’t have to sweat the work that other people dread. They just do it.

“Hey, she’s always been good at this stuff”," or “Well, he’s the only one who knows how to do it,” you might hear around the office. But you shouldn’t take it for granted.

Recognize and reward the behavior you want to see more of. Make space for the work that grabs headlines AND the work that doesn’t in your rewards and recognition structure. Pay special attention to the people who prefer to stay out of the spotlight; honor their work and contributions because it is important, not necessarily because it grabs attention.

Make recognition for this work specific. Make it count.

Do it well enough, and your team and organization might just become a boring little miracle itself.

Read the article.

Source:
Escobar C. (26 February 2018). "Boring Little Miracles" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address https://blog.shrm.org/blog/boring-little-miracles


Ashleigh Galligan's Universal Cheesy Potatoes

For this month’s Dish, Ashleigh Galligan has given us her Dine In and Dine Out choices. Check them out below!

Dine In

Ashleigh’s favorite Dine In recipe to enjoy with her family is Cheesy Potatoes. It’s great for any occasion and can be paired with any meal!

You can get the full recipe and directions here.

Dine Out

Ashleigh’s favorite place to eat out is Ala Roma Pizzeria & Pub in Fond du Lac. Her favorite dish is…everything! “You can’t go wrong with italian food!”

You can visit their website here.

171 N Pioneer Rd, Fond du Lac, WI 54935

Thanks for joining us for this month’s Dish! If you try a recipe or restaurant, be sure to let us know. Don’t forget to come back next month for more yummy favorites!


CenterStage: Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Distraction is Deadly: April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month

In 2015 alone, 3,477 people have died and another 391,000 have been injured due to distracted driving.

Not only is distracted driving hazardous to your life, but it can negatively impact the drivers’ lives that surround you. Distracted Driving Awareness Month is an effort by the National Safety Council to help recognize and eliminate preventable deaths from distracted driving. In honor of Distracted Driving Awareness Month, this month’s CenterStage features Cathleen Christensen, Vice President of Property & Casualty at Hierl Insurance, who will provide safe driving practices and how companies can ensure their employees are using them.

What is Distracted Driving?

Distracted driving is a public health issue that affects us all. According to the National Safety Council, distracted driving is any activity that diverts attention from driving, including talking or texting, eating and drinking, talking to people in your vehicle, adjusting stereo, entertainment or navigation systems. You cannot drive safely unless your attention is fully focused on the road ahead of you, any activity that you partake in simultaneously provides a distraction and increases the risk of a crash.

Awareness for Awareness

Bringing awareness to distracted driving is essentially bringing awareness to awareness. There are three main types of distraction:

  1. Visual – taking your eyes off the road
  2. Cognitive – taking your mind off driving
  3. Manual – taking your hands off the wheel

These days, it’s so easy to be a distracted driver – from texting, to talking on the phone, or even using a navigation system. The biggest one, texting, is especially dangerous because it involves committing all three types of distraction. Some studies even say texting and driving is worse than driving under the influence. So, how can you keep your employees aware while driving?

“Several studies believe, as well as myself, that employers should prohibit any work policy or practice that requires or encourages
workers to text and drive.”

– Cathleen Christensen, VP of Property & Casualty at Hierl

But how can you really get your employees to commit to your ‘No Distracted Driving’ policy? It’s as easy as providing education and solutions. Sometimes, it’s especially effective to have your employees sign a contract stating if they need to use any form of a hand-held device, they must pull over to the side of the road. Remind your employees to drive with their devices off or on silent to keep the urge under control. Plus, several cellular devices have come out with ways to set phones to driving mode, leaving a custom voicemail to anyone who calls while an employee/employer is driving, letting the caller know they will call the caller back later.

Companies suffer from great financial loss yearly due to distracted driving. By putting these safe driving practices in place, you will save lives AND money. If you’d like to get more help on implementing a safe driving policy within your workplace, please contact Cathleen at 920.921.5921.