How to Inspire and Energize Your Workforce Every Day

In this article from the SHRM blog, Desda Moss brings up some fascinating points on how to energize your workforce, as well as provides some great examples of books and behavior. Dive in with us below.


What does it take to inspire others? In The Inspiration Code: How the Best Leaders Energize People Every Day (Amacom, 2017), Kristi Hedges, a leadership communications expert and author who coaches CEOs and senior executives, draws from in-depth research to highlight the tools and practices used by inspirational leaders. Her guide provides a targeted approach to igniting inspiration, relying on a framework informed by hundreds of interviews, survey data and communications studies.
With a methodology Hedges calls "The Inspiration Path," the book takes complex leadership concepts and translates them into actionable steps.
Here are five surprising findings about inspirational leaders, according to Hedges:
  • Listening is the highest rated inspirational behavior. We're not inspired as much when someone talks at us as we are when someone listens to us. Time spent crafting beautiful messages matters less than what happens when leaders are quiet. To be an inspiring leader, you have to listen fully, with an open mind.
  • Small moments have the biggest impact. Most people recall their most inspired moments as times they were engaged in personal conversations where another person spoke authentically and focused on them. People can hold the words from an inspiring 10-minute conversation for their entire lives. Conversations create an inspirational trigger. For example, a conversation about purpose hits upon why we are at this moment in our lives and in our careers. These conversations transcend what we're doing in the here and now to reveal patterns that take us further, enhance our enjoyment, tap into our passion and spark in us the will to be in service to a larger cause.
  • Identifying and vocalizing another person's potential is life-changing.People who inspire us notice and grow our potential—honestly, specifically and graciously. We are often unaware of the unique talents and value we bring. Having someone take the time to tell us is a powerful reminder and can open our minds to what's possible.
  • People who inspire us are real, just like us. Contrary to common cultural myths that inspirational leaders are either charismatic iconoclasts or flawless, unflappable ideals, those who inspire us are actually relatable and down-to-earth. Truly inspirational leaders don't script their words, put on false airs or try to be perfect. They get through to us because they're authentic.  To be more inspirational, you need to let any well-honed professional persona go. We connect with people on emotional terms. We want to see what they actually care about.
  • Technology is killing inspiration.  Distraction and distance are enemies of inspiration. One study found that just the appearance of a cellphone on the table during a conversation—even if silenced—reduces empathy. If you want to be inspiring, you need to get away from distractions, electronic or otherwise, and show up fully.
Hedges contends that inspirational communicators don't possess any rare qualities, only the will to sharpen their listening skills, spark purpose in others and build connections that lead to an engaged workforce.
You can read the original article here.
Source:
Moss D. (20 October 2017). "How to Inspire and Energize Your Workforce Every Day" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address https://blog.shrm.org/blog/how-to-inspire-and-energize-your-workforce-every-day

4 ways for advisers to protect and build business during fourth quarter

As the end of the year approaches, it's important for your business to thrive. In this article from Employee Benefit Advisors, Ron Goldstein addresses the fundamental ways to protect and build your business during your fourth quarter. Check it out below.


The fourth quarter is one of the busiest and most chaotic times for brokers. It is also the “make-or-break” period for protecting and building their respective books of business for the coming year.

It is wise for agents to move quickly during this busy season to help clients get a head start on health plan renewals, annual budgeting and more. Here are four tips for brokers to keep in mind:

1) Identify network disruptions. The time is now to proactively talk with clients about any network disruptions or problems they may have with their coverage. For instance, it is well-established that people want to see their own doctors, specialists, pharmacies and hospitals. But when they unexpectedly cannot — or when access requires expensive out-of-network and out-of-pocket costs — substantial upset will occur. The result can be a significant business threat for brokers. It is best, then, to identify any network “pain points” before the busy season is in full swing. This provides brokers with the needed time to work with clients to resolve any issues while also helping to assure that they are avoided and averted in the future.

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2) Understand plan disrupters and alternatives. This may seem obvious, but it is a vital point worth driving home. Whether a plan is bronze, platinum or somewhere in between, there are often adjustments made from one year to the next. Agents need to be intimately familiar with any changes, whether significant or minor, that might disrupt a client’s existing coverage. This can include network modifications, premiums, copays and so forth. So, clearly understand any variations and be prepared to discuss alternative options based on a business owner’s needs and expectations.

3) Address client budgets. Remember to talk with employers about any budgetary changes to their business. Depending on the discussion, this can be the optimal time to kick-start a conversation about alternative defined-contribution options. For instance, perhaps there are opportunities to raise the fixed-dollar amount for employees and/or to explore value-added benefits such as dental, vision, life insurance and other ancillary offerings. On the flip side, you can consider basing your client’s contribution on a different plan option that may provide costs savings if they’re looking to try and reduce their healthcare expenditure. Either way, addressing budgets early on helps brokers ensure they are tailoring plans that best meet client needs.

4) Move off a Dec. 1 renewal period: Moving off of this date may help provide clients with a better open enrollment and underwriting experience. Many renewals get stacked up right before this deadline, putting more pressure on agent customer service. At the same time, it can be easy to get bogged down and rushed with multiple clients requiring quoting, enrollment, plan administration and more to meet looming deadlines. Beginning the renewal process earlier in the quarter provides brokers and their clients with plenty of time to work together to address and select the right plan offerings. Additionally, it may make sense to also explore a larger array of options and pricing advantageous to brokers and clients alike.

While the end of 2017 is ahead, the beginning to a successful 2018 is right now for brokers, agents and benefits professionals. Those who anticipate client needs early-on and take pre-emptive efforts now will be better positioned to lock-in and expand business for the coming year.

 

You can read the original article here.

Source:

Goldstein R. (20 October 2017). "4 ways for advisers to protect and build business during fourth quarter" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address https://www.employeebenefitadviser.com/opinion/4-ways-for-employee-benefit-brokers-to-protect-and-build-business-during-fourth-quarter


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5 SIMPLE STEPS TO DEVELOPING A COMPETITIVE PAY PRACTICE

Have you struggled with employee engagement and building a competitive pay practice? Fortunately, HR Morning has provided us and you with this awesome article, including five simple steps toward a competitive pay practice. Read more below.


In today’s competitive environment, employees are more educated than ever before about the current salary rates in their location and industry. If you want your business to remain competitive, and retain top talent, you need to stay one-step ahead of your competition, and have a solid pay strategy that’s based on accurate salary data – not speculation.

Here are a few simple steps to get you closer to a compensation strategy that retains talent and keeps your company ahead of the curve.

1)      Get a Pulse on Your Market

After a series of wage declines in 2009 and 2010, a number of industries are now seeing continual salary growth across multiple industries and locations. If your company’s compensation plan is based on the trends in those leaner years immediately after the recession, it’s probably time to revisit your pay strategy. Or you may be at risk of losing talent to competitors who’ve more quickly adapted to shifts in the market. Keep an eye on the PayScale Index to keep track of quarterly trends in pay by location, industry and job category.

 

2)      Benchmark Your Job Positions

It’s great to have a pulse on the overarching pay trends in your industry and area, but it’s another thing to have confidence that you’re actually paying top employees at the right rates for their job. By engaging in at least once-per-year salary benchmarking, you’ll be able to identify employees who are at a “high flight risk” of turnover, and be able to make smarter decisions about where you allocate your labor budget. Download PayScale’s How to Perform Compensation Benchmarking and Salary Ranges whitepaper for more information.

 

3)      Develop a Compensation Plan

Often times, businesses fear that having a compensation plan will limit their ability to make good business decisions, so they skip building a compensation plan in favor of fewer rules and less structure. But without a formalized compensation plan, companies often miss an opportunity to structure their pay decisions in a way that support business goals. As companies grow, the costs of compensation continue to rise, and without a formalized plan in place, companies often experience problems with pay inequities, employee retention, and engagement. Simply put, it’s easier, and more cost-effective to take small steps toward developing a smart compensation plan now, than it is to alter your course later down the line.

 

4)      Identify Pay Inequities

Some people live by the motto, “What you don’t know won’t hurt you.” That’s a motto your organization cannot afford to live by when it comes to internal pay inequities. Without a formalized comp plan, it’s often common for pay inequities to develop across organizations and departments. Those pay inequities can most definitely hurt you and your organization in the form of heightened turnover, over payment, and even litigation. Learn how to identify and resolve these inequities with PayScale’s guide to pay inequities.

 

5)      Communicate Your Compensation Strategy

If you go through the process of creating a compensation plan, don’t forget to let your employees know about it. In theory, your compensation strategy should reiterate and support your business goals. So, it’s important to communicate to employees how their work aligns with the goals of the organization, and how their compensation reflects that. If you share with your employees, and make your investments in talent clear to them, you’ll be surprised by the positive effect it has on employee morale. Check out PayScale’s Four Tips for Communicating Your Compensation Plan to Employees to help you get started.

 

Need help developing a competitive compensation strategy, or maintaining salary ranges for your workforce? PayScale offers access to the largest online salary database in the world. With data that’s updated on a daily basis, and software designed to help you maintain salary ranges, benchmark jobs, and allocate raises, PayScale is the choice for businesses who value accuracy and ROI in their pay practices. Request a demo of PayScale compensation software to learn how PayScale’s fresh, detailed data can support good compensation planning.

 

Read the original article here.

Source:

HRMorning.com (N.D.). "5 SIMPLE STEPS TO DEVELOPING A COMPETITIVE PAY PRACTICE" [Web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://pbpmedia.staging.wpengine.com/5-simple-steps-to-developing-a-competitive-pay-practice/


Cyber Risks & Liabilities - November 2017

We live in a world centralized around cyber activity – so shouldn’t employers protect themselves from cyber risks? The answer: yes. This article will help employers be aware of the damage a breach in cyber security can cause and help them seek the best cyber insurance.


5 Cyber Risk Questions Every Board Should Ask

When a data breach or other cyber event occurs, the damages can be significant, often resulting in lawsuits, fines and serious financial losses. In order for organizations to truly protect themselves from cyber risks, corporate boards must play an active role. Not only does involvement from leadership improve cyber security, it can also reduce liability for board members.

To help oversee their organization’s cyber risk management, boards should ask the following questions:

  1. Does the organization utilize technology to prevent data breaches? Boards should ensure that the management team reviews company technology at least annually, ensuring that cyber security tools are current and effective.
  2. Does the organization have a comprehensive cyber security program that includes specific policies and procedures? Boards should ensure that cyber security programs align with industry standards and are audited on a regular basis to ensure effectiveness and internal compliance.
  3. Has the management team provided adequate employee training to ensure sensitive data is handled correctly? Boards can help oversee the process of making training programs that foster cyber awareness.
  4. Has management taken appropriate steps to reduce cyber risks when working with third parties? Boards should work with the company’s management team to create a third-party agreement that identifies how the vendor will protect sensitive data, whether the vendor will subcontract services and how it will inform the organization of compromised data.
  5. Has the organization conducted a thorough risk assessment and considered purchasing cyber liability insurance? Boards, alongside the company’s management team, should conduct a cyber risk assessment and identify potential gaps. From there, organizations can work with their insurance broker to customize a policy that meets their specific needs.

Key Considerations When Buying Cyber Insurance

Buying cyber insurance is not a one-size-fits-all process. To ensure your business has sufficient cyber coverage, it is critical to assess your needs and consider your specific risks. The following are some common elements of cyber insurance policies to consider when building optimal coverage for your business:

  • Limits and sublimits—Hierl Insurance Inc. can assist you in determining appropriate limits by utilizing industry benchmarking data and projected breach costs. From there, we can examine your sublimits, which don’t provide extra coverage, but set a maximum to cover a specific loss.
  • Retroactive coverage—Breaches can go undiscovered for years. For protection from unidentified cyber incidents, ask for a retroactive date that is earlier than the policy’s inception date.
  • Exclusions—Common cyber policy exclusions, such as outdated software, unencrypted mobile devices and penalties from credit issuers, can adversely impact coverage. Understand your policy exclusions before committing.
  • Panel provisions—Many insurance companies require policyholders to use preapproved investigators, consultants and legal professionals in the event of a cyber breach. If you have a preferred team of experts, make sure your preferred policy allows you to work with them before signing.
  • Consent provisions—Some cyber policies contain consent provisions that require obtaining the insurer’s consent before incurring certain expenses related to cyber claims. If prior consent provisions are included in the policy and cannot be removed, policyholders can change them to ensure that the carrier’s consent cannot be unreasonably withheld.
  • Vendor acts and omissions—Most organizations use third-party vendors to process or store a portion of their data. While they make it easier to do business, they also represent a potential exposure. It is critical that your business’s cyber liability policy covers claims that result from breaches caused by your vendors.

Cyber insurance is continually evolving alongside emerging cyber threats. Contact Hierl Insurance Inc. to help proactively assess your risks and ensure that your insurance coverage is in line with your specific business practices and exposures.

 

 

 

 

Yahoo Says All Accounts Were Hacked in 2013

Yahoo recently announced that, in contrast to an earlier estimate, all 3 billion of its accounts were hacked in 2013. The news could not only increase the legal exposure for Yahoo’s new owner Verizon Wireless, but also increase the number of class-action lawsuits expected in U.S. federal and state courts.

Recently obtained information shows that the stolen information did not include passwords in clear text, bank account information or card data. However, this information was protected with outdated encryption that experts said is easy to crack. It also included backup email addresses and security questions that could make it easier to break into other user accounts.

In late 2016, Yahoo made users change their passwords if they hadn’t since the hack, and invalidated old security questions and answers.

Equifax Cyber Security Incident

Equifax Inc. announced in September that about 143 million U.S. consumers may have been affected by one of the largest breaches in history.

Names, Social Security numbers, birthdates, addresses and driver’s license numbers were accessed by the intruders, according to a statement from Equifax. Credit card numbers for about 209,000 consumers were also accessed.

GDPR Compliance Deadline Approaching

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) requires businesses to protect the personal data and privacy of European Union (EU) citizens for transactions that occur within EU member states. Noncompliance could be costly for businesses—amounting to up to €20 million or 4 percent of global annual turnover, whichever is higher.

Companies that do business with customers in the EU must be able to show compliance by May 25, 2018. For more information on whether the GDPR affects your business, and how to comply, visit the website of the European Commission here.


Don't Put Up with the Bull of Bullying

Bullying plagues our nation - and not just in high school. Here is an excellent article from our partner UBA Benefits on how to spot and handle bullying in the workplace.


Read the original article here.

Source:

Mukhtar G. (19 September 2017). "Don't Put Up with the Bull of Bullying" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://blog.ubabenefits.com/dont-put-up-with-the-bull-of-bullying

 

There’s no place for bullying and that’s especially true in the workplace, yet many employees bully their co-workers. So, how does this happen? It used to be that bullying was confined to the schoolyard, but now it’s spread to cyberbullying and workplace bullying. Now, if there’s a culture of bullying at an organization, often it’s repeated as people climb the corporate ladder even though they were bullied themselves when they held lower positions.

An article on the website Human Resource Executive Online titled, “How to Bully-proof the Workplace,” says that “80 percent of bullying is done by people who have a position of power over other people.” Let that number sink in. That means four out of five people in positions of power will bully their subordinates.

One possible reason for the high number is that bullying may be difficult to identify and the person doing the bullying may not even realize it. Either the bully, or the victim, could view the action as teasing, or workplace banter. However, when one person is continually picked on, then that person is being bullied. Likewise, if a manager picks on all of his or her subordinates, then that person is a bully.

It’s important for organizations to have policies in place to thwart bullying and not just for the toll it takes on employees. It also begins to affect productivity. Those being bullied often feel like their work doesn’t matter and their abilities are insufficient. Worse is that bullies tend to resent talented people as they’re perceived as a threat. So, bullies tend to manipulate opinions about that employee in order to keep them from being promoted.

Eventually, talented employees decide to work elsewhere, leaving the employer spending time and money to find a replacement. But the bully doesn’t care. It just means they get to apply their old tricks on someone who isn’t used to them.

At some point, someone will fight back. Not physically, of course, but through documentation. An employee who is being bullied should immediately document any and all occurrences of workplace bullying and then present those documents to someone in HR. Most likely, this will result in identification of the bullying, stoppage of it, counseling for both the bully and the victim, and, if not already enacted, policies to prevent it from happening again.

 

Read the original article here.

Source:

Mukhtar G. (19 September 2017). "Don't Put Up with the Bull of Bullying" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://blog.ubabenefits.com/dont-put-up-with-the-bull-of-bullying


Safety Focused Newsletter - November 2017

At Hierl, we take the safety of our workforce very seriously. Every month, we do our best to inform our employees, as well as other employers, on ways to reduce the risk of violence in the workplace. This month, we've decided to focus on the importance of a clean, walkable workplace, and - in light of the unfortunate violence across the US - we want to put a spotlight on safety when it comes to terrorism in the workplace.

Declutter for a Safe Workplace

A cluttered, unorganized workspace isn’t just unsightly—it is also dangerous. Poor workplace housekeeping, such as failing to clean up after yourself, can contribute to the following:

  • Injuries caused by slips and falls when clutter is on the floor
  • Potential fire hazards
  • Exposure to hazardous dust and vapors
  • Ergonomics issues that arise when clutter takes over your workspace, leaving you little room to work

No matter what type of environment you work in, it is important to keep your workspace clean and organized, not only for safety reasons, but also for productivity and morale. According to researchers, a cluttered environment can cause stress, and restrict your ability to focus and process information. The following tips can help you keep your workspace safe and organized:

  • Regularly wipe down your workstation with a damp cloth or disinfecting wipe to remove dust, dirt and germs. Don’t forget the keyboard and mouse if you use a computer.
  • Clean up spills and dispose of all trash immediately.
  • Avoid eating at your workstation, especially if you work with hazardous materials.
  • Keep walkways and floors free of clutter and tripping hazards.
  • Store equipment in designated areas when tasks are complete.

What to Do in the Event of an Active Shooter

Workplace violence may be a rare occurrence, but you should never underestimate the importance of being prepared in the event that your workplace is targeted by an active shooter. An active shooter is an individual who is engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area.

Shootings can happen anytime, anywhere. The general perception is that these events happen in bad areas or in buildings that contain key members of society. However, this is not always the case, and the majority of shootings that occur in the workplace are carried out by employees, or former employees, for reasons associated with their job.

While you may not be able to prevent an attack from happening, it is critical to keep the following tips in mind in the event that your workplace experiences an active shooter incident:

  • Evacuate the premises if possible.
  • Call 911 if you can do so safely.
  • Warn everyone you encounter to leave the area.
  • Remain silent and still if you can’t flee safely. Be sure to silence any devices you may be carrying.
  • Block any doors with heavy furniture if you are hiding in a room. Don’t stand near any windows.

Only fight back as a last resort. Be sure to cooperate with emergency personnel—it can mean the difference between life and death. When law enforcement arrives, be sure to react in the following ways:

  • Calmly follow instructions.
  • Put down any items you are carrying, and keep hands visible at all times.
  • Provide as much information as you can.

Attacks can happen without warning. Since they are often finished before law enforcement arrives on the scene, it is important to consider the threat of an active shooter in advance and be aware of your company’s emergency procedures.


The Killjoy of Office Culture

Sometimes, negativity in the office is hard to avoid. Read this article for some helpful tips to take care of those who may be aiding in the negative atmosphere.


One of the latest things trending right now in business is the importance of office culture. When everyone in the office is working well together, productivity rises and efficiency increases. Naturally, the opposite is true when employees do not work well together and the corporate culture suffers. So, what are these barriers and what can you do to avoid them?

According to an article titled, “8 ways to ruin an office culture,” in Employee Benefit News, the ways to kill corporate culture may seem intuitive, but that doesn’t mean they still don’t happen. Here’s what organizations should do to improve their corporate culture.

Provide positive employee feedback. While it’s easy to criticize, and pointing out employees’ mistakes can often help them learn to not repeat them, it’s just as important to recognize success and praise an employee for a job well done. An “attaboy/attagirl” can really boost someone’s spirits and let them know their work is appreciated.

Give credit where credit is due. If an assistant had the bright idea, if a subordinate did all the work, or if a consultant discovered the solution to a problem, then he or she should be publicly acknowledged for it. It doesn’t matter who supervised these people, to the victor go the spoils. If someone had the guts to speak up, then he or she should get the glory. Theft is wrong, and it’s just as wrong when you take someone’s idea, or hard work, and claim it as your own.

Similarly, listen to all ideas from all levels within the company. Every employee, regardless of their position on the corporate ladder, likes to feel that their contributions matter. From the C-suite, all the way down to the interns, a genuinely good idea is always worth investigating regardless of whether the person who submitted the idea has an Ivy League degree or not. Furthermore, sometimes it takes a different perspective – like one from an employee on a different management/subordinate level – to see the best way to resolve an issue.

Foster teamwork because many hands make light work. Or, as I like to say, competition breeds contempt. You compete to get your job, you compete externally against other companies, and you may even compete against your peers for an award. You shouldn’t have to compete with your own co-workers. The winner of that competition may not necessarily be the best person and it will often have negative consequences in terms of trust.

Get rid of unproductive employees. One way to stifle innovation and hurt morale is by having an employee who doesn’t do any work while everyone else is either picking up the slack, or covering for that person’s duties. Sometimes it’s necessary to prune the branches.

Let employees have their privacy – especially on social media. As long as an employee isn’t conducting personal business on company time, there shouldn’t be anything wrong with an employee updating their social media accounts when they’re “off the clock.” In addition, as long as employees aren’t divulging company secrets, or providing other corporate commentary that runs afoul of local, state, or federal laws, then there’s no reason to monitor what they post.

Promote a healthy work-life balance. Yes, employees have families, they get sick, or they just need time away from the workplace to de-stress. And while there will always be times when extra hours are needed to finish a project, it shouldn’t be standard operating procedure at a company to insist that employees sacrifice their time.

 

You can read the original article here.

Source:

Mukhtar G. (14 September 2017). "The Killjoy of Office Culture" [web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://blog.ubabenefits.com/the-killjoy-of-office-culture


New Regulations Broadening Employer Exemptions to Contraceptive Coverage: Impact on Women


You can read the original article here.

Source:

Sobel L., Salganicoff A., Rosenzweig C. (6 October 2017). "New Regulations Broadening Employer Exemptions to Contraceptive Coverage: Impact on Women" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address https://www.kff.org/womens-health-policy/issue-brief/new-regulations-broadening-employer-exemptions-to-contraceptive-coverage-impact-on-women/

The Trump Administration has issued new regulations that significantly broaden employers’ ability to be exempt from the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) contraceptive coverage requirement.  The regulation opens the door for any employer or college/ university with a student health plan with objections to contraceptive coverage based on religious beliefs to qualify for an exemption. Any nonprofit or closely-held for-profit employer with moral objections to contraceptive coverage also qualifies for an exemption. Their female employees, dependents and students will no longer be entitled to coverage for the full range of FDA approved contraceptives at no cost.

On October 6, 2017, the Trump Administration issued two new regulations greatly expanding the types of employers that may be exempt from the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) contraceptive coverage requirement.  These regulations are a significant departure from the Obama-era regulations that only granted an exception to houses of worship.  One of the regulations allows nonprofits or for-profit employer with an objection to contraceptive coverage based on religious beliefs to qualify for an exemption and drop contraceptive coverage from their plans.  The other regulation also exempts all but publicly traded employers with moral objections to contraception from rule. These new policies, effective immediately, also apply to private institutions of higher education that issue student health plans. The immediate impact of these regulations on the number of women who are eligible for contraceptive coverage is unknown, but the new regulations open the door for many more employers to withhold contraceptive coverage from their plans.

New regulations from the Trump administration greatly expand exemption from #ACA contraceptive coverage rule

Contraceptive coverage under the ACA has made access to the full range of contraceptive methods affordable to millions of women. This provision is part of a set of key preventive services that has been identified by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) for women that must be covered without cost-sharing. Since it was first issued in 2012, the contraceptive coverage provision has been controversial. While very popular with the public, with over 77% of women and 64% of men reporting support for no-cost contraceptive coverage, it has been the focus of litigation brought by religious employers, with two cases (Zubik v Burwell and Burwell v Hobby Lobby)  reaching the Supreme Court. This brief explains the contraceptive coverage rule under the ACA, the impact it has had on coverage, and how the new regulations issued by the Trump Administration change the contraceptive coverage requirement for employers and affect women’s coverage.

How do the new regulations change contraceptive coverage requirements for employers?

Since they were announced in 2011, the contraceptive coverage rules have evolved through litigation and new regulations. Most employers were required to include the coverage in their plans. Houses of worship could choose to be exempt from the requirement if they had religious objections. This exception meant that women workers and female dependents of exempt employers did not have guaranteed coverage for either some or all FDA approved contraceptive methods if their employer had an objection. Religiously affiliated nonprofits and closely held for-profit corporations were not eligible for an exemption, but could choose an accommodation. This option was offered to religiously affiliated nonprofit employers and then extended to closely held for-profitsafter the Supreme Court ruling in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby. The accommodation allowed these employers to opt out of providing and paying for contraceptive coverage in their plans by either notifying their insurer, third party administrator, or the federal government of their objection. The insurers were then responsible for covering the costs of contraception, which assured that their workers and dependents had contraceptive coverage while relieving the employers of the requirement to pay for it.

As of 2015, 10% of nonprofits with 5,000 or more employees had elected for an accommodation without challenging the requirement. This approach, however, has not been acceptable to all nonprofits with religious objections.1 In May 2016, the Supreme Court remanded Zubik v. Burwell, sending seven cases brought by religious nonprofits objecting to the contraceptive coverage accommodation back to the respective district Courts of Appeal. The Supreme Court instructed the parties to work together to “arrive at an approach going forward that accommodates petitioners’ religious exercise while at the same time ensuring that women covered by petitioners’ health plans receive full and equal health coverage, including contraceptive coverage.”2

On October 6, 2017, the Trump Administration issued new regulations greatly expanding eligibility for the exemption to all nonprofit and closely-held for-profit employers with objections to contraceptive coverage based on religious beliefs or moral convictions, including private institutions of higher education that issue student health plans (Figure 1).  In addition, publicly traded for-profit companies with objections based on religious beliefs also qualify for an exemption. There is no guaranteed right of contraceptive coverage for their female employees and dependents or students. Table 1 presents the changes to the contraceptive coverage rule from the Obama Administration in the new Interim Final regulations issued by the Trump Administration.

Figure 1: Employers Objecting to Contraceptive Coverage: Exemptions and Accommodations Under the Trump Administration Regulations

The accommodation will be available to employers that previously qualified for the accommodation.  They now will also have the choice of an exemption. The federal departments issuing the regulations posit that these new rules will have limited impact on the number of women losing contraceptive coverage.   However, it is not clear how many employers previously utilizing the accommodation will now opt for an exemption, resulting in the loss of contraceptive coverage for their employees and dependents.  In addition, there are also an unknown number of organizations that were not previously eligible for either the accommodation or exemption that may now opt for an exemption. These new regulations create two new categories of employers who can now qualify for an exemption or can voluntarily chooses an accommodation:  1) publicly traded for-profit companies with a religious objection and 2) nonprofit and closely held for-profit employers who have a moral objection to contraceptives, a considerably larger pool of employers than when the exemption was available only to those who were employees of a house of worship or who were eligible for an accommodation in the past.

Table 1: Summary of Changes in the Contraceptive Coverage Regulations for Objecting Entities
  Obama Administration
August 2012 to October 5, 2017
Trump Administration
Effective October 6, 2017
What types of contraceptives must plans cover without cost-sharing? At least one of each of the 18 FDA approved contraceptive methods for women, as prescribed, along with counseling and related services must be covered without cost-sharing. No change
Are any employers “exempt” from the contraceptive mandate?
  • Religious institutions defined as “houses of worship”
  • Grandfathered plans
  • No notice to employees is required. Women workers and female dependents must pay for their own contraceptives.
  • Religious institutions defined as “houses of worship”
  • Grandfathered plans
  • Nonprofit or  for-profit employers (including publicly traded companies), insurers, or private colleges or universities that issue student insurance plans with a religious objection to contraceptive coverage
  • Nonprofit or closely held for-profit employers, insurers, or private colleges or universities that issue student insurance plans with a moralobjection to contraceptive coverage
  • Notice is only required if the plan previously included contraceptive coverage. Women workers and female dependents must pay for their own contraceptives.
Who pays for contraceptive coverage for employees of organizations receiving an exemption?
  • The cost of contraceptives is borne by women workers and female dependents.
  • There is no guarantee of contraceptive coverage for employees of an exempt organization.
  • The employer may choose to cover some methods, but has no obligation to cover all 18 FDA methods without cost sharing
No change

What type of employers may seek an “accommodation” to avoid paying for contraceptives in their plans?  
  • Closely held for-profit corporations and religiously affiliated nonprofits with religious objections to contraception can opt out of providing and paying for contraceptive coverage
  • Notice must be provided to either their insurer, third party administrator, or the federal government of their objection.
  • Women workers and female dependents receive no cost contraceptive coverage.
  • Any entity (except for houses of worship) eligible for an exemption can choose the accommodation instead of the exemption.
  • Notice must be provided to either their insurer, third party administrator, or the federal government of their objection.
  • Women workers and female dependents receive no cost contraceptive coverage.
Who pays for contraceptive coverage for employees of organizations receiving an accommodation?
  • Insurance companies of firms obtaining an accommodation must pay for contraceptive coverage.
  • Third-party administrators (TPA) of self-funded health plans must cover the costs of contraceptives for employees. The costs of the benefit are offset by reductions in the fees the TPA pays to participate in the federal exchange.
No change
When can entities change from an accommodation to an exemption? N/A
  • When an employer or private college or university currently using the accommodation opts for an exemption, the revocation of contraceptive coverage will be effective on the first day of the first plan year that begins 30 days after the date of the revocation or 60 days notice may be given in a summary of benefits statement.
  • The issuer or third party administrator is responsible for providing the notice to the beneficiaries.

How has the contraceptive coverage rule affected women?

Contraceptive use among women is widespread, with over 99% of sexually-active women using at least one method at some point during their lifetime.3 Contraceptives make up an estimated 30-44% of out-of-pocket health care spending for women.4 Since the implementation of the ACA, out-of-pocket spending on prescription drugs has decreased dramatically (Figure 2). The majority of this decline (63%) can be attributed to the drop in out-of-pocket expenses on the oral contraceptive pill for women.5 One study estimates that roughly $1.4 billion dollars per year in out-of-pocket savings on the pill resulted from the ACA’s contraceptive mandate.6  By 2013, most women had no out-of-pocket costs for their contraception, as median expenses for most contraceptive methods, including the IUD and the pill, dropped to zero.7

Figure 2: The Contraceptive Coverage Policy Has Had a Large Impact on Out-Of-Pocket Spending in a Short Amount of Time

This provision has also influenced the decisions women make in their choice of method. After implementation of the ACA contraceptive coverage requirement, women were more likely to choose any method of prescription contraceptive, with a shift towards more effective long-term methods.8  High upfront costs of long-acting methods, such as the IUD and implant, had been a barrier to women who might otherwise prefer these more effective methods.  When faced with no cost-sharing, women choose these methods more often9, with significant implications for the rate of unintended pregnancy and associated costs of childbirth.10

Finally, decreases in cost-sharing were associated with better adherence and more consistent use of the pill. This was especially true among users of generic pills.  One study showed that even copayments as low as $6 were associated with higher levels of discontinuation and non-adherence,11 increasing the risk of unintended pregnancy.

Do states with no-cost contraceptive coverage laws allow exemptions to objecting entities?

The federal standards under Affordable Care Act created a minimum set of preventive benefits that applied to most health plans regulated by the federal government (self-funded plans, federal employee plans) and states (individual, small and large group plans), including contraceptive coverage for women with no cost-sharing.  States have also historically regulated insurance, and many have had mandated minimum benefits for decades. State laws, however, have more limited reach in that they only apply to state regulated fully insured plans, do not have jurisdiction over self-funded plans, where 61% of covered workers are insured.12 In self-funded plans, the employer assumes the risk of providing covered services and usually contracts with a third party administrator (TPA) to manage the claims payment process. These plans are overseen by the Federal Department of Labor under the Employer Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and are only subject to federally established regulations.13  The ACA sets a minimum standard of coverage for preventive services for all plans. However, state laws regulating insurance, including contraceptive coverage, can require fully insured plans to provide coverage beyond the federal standards.

Eight states have strengthened and expanded the federal contraceptive coverage requirement (CA, IL, MD, ME, NV, NY, OR, VT).  Another 20 states have contraceptive equity laws that require plans to cover contraceptives if they also provide coverage for prescription drugs but they do not necessarily require coverage of all FDA-approved contraceptives or ban cost-sharing (Figure 3).

Figure 3: Many States Have Contraceptive Coverage Requirements

Many of the 28 states that have passed contraceptive coverage laws (both equity and no-cost coverage) have a provision for exemptions, but the laws vary from state to state and only apply to fully insured plans.  This means that there may be a conflict between the state and federal requirements when it comes to religious exemptions.  In some states with a contraceptive coverage requirement, some employers who are eligible for an exemption under federal law will not qualify for an exemption under state law (Table 2). Employers in those states will have to have to meet the standards established by their state even though they may qualify for an exemption based on the new federal regulations.  This conflict may set the stage for future litigation.

Table 2: State Requirements for No-Cost Contraceptive Coverage
StateDate Effective Applies to Coverage required without cost sharing Exemptions allowed
  Private plans Medicaid With RX all FDA approved OTC Vasectomy Religious Moral
CaliforniaJanuary 2015 X MCOs X Narrowly defined nonprofit religious employers None
IllinoisJanuary 2017 X X X
except male condoms
Any employer, or insurer with a religious objection Any employer, or insurer with a moral objection
MarylandJanuary 2018 X X X X X Religious organizations if the coverage conflicts with the organization’s bona fide religious beliefs and practices None
MaineJanuary 2019 X X Narrowly defined nonprofit religious employers None
NevadaJanuary 2018 X X X Insurers affiliated with a religious organization None
New YorkAugust 2017 X X Narrowly defined nonprofit religious employers* None
OregonAugust 2017 X X X Narrowly defined nonprofit religious employers None
VermontOctober 2016 X X – and all other public health assistance programs X X None None
NOTES: *Requires the insurer to offer a rider to policyholders so that women will have contraceptive coverage.
SOURCE: Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of state laws and regulations.

Conclusion

The Trump Administration’s new regulations substantially expand the exemption to nonprofit and for-profit employers, as well as to private colleges or universities with religious or moral objections to contraceptive coverage. It is unknown how many of these employers and colleges will maintain coverage through the accommodation as before and how many will now opt for the exemption leaving their students, employees and dependents without no-cost coverage for the full range of contraceptive methods. As a result of the new regulation, choices about coverage and cost-sharing will be made by employers and private colleges and universities that issue student plans. For many women, their employers will determine whether they have no-cost coverage to the full range of FDA approved methods.  Their choice of contraceptive methods may again be limited by cost, placing some of the most effective yet costly methods out of financial reach.

You can read the original article here.

Source:

Sobel L., Salganicoff A., Rosenzweig C. (6 October 2017). "New Regulations Broadening Employer Exemptions to Contraceptive Coverage: Impact on Women" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address https://www.kff.org/womens-health-policy/issue-brief/new-regulations-broadening-employer-exemptions-to-contraceptive-coverage-impact-on-women/


IRS Releases Draft Forms and Instructions for 2017 ACA Reporting

Here are the latest updates in ACA Reporting, including the released IRS draft forms and instructions.


Read the original article here.

Source:

Capilla D. (5 October 2017). "IRS Releases Draft Forms and Instructions for 2017 ACA Reporting" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://blog.ubabenefits.com/irs-releases-draft-forms-and-instructions-for-2017-aca-reporting-1

 

Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), individuals are required to have health insurance while applicable large employers (ALEs) are required to offer health benefits to their full-time employees.

Reporting is required by employers with 50 or more full-time (or full-time equivalent) employees, insurers, or sponsors of self-funded health plans, on health coverage that is offered in order for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to verify that:

  • Individuals have the required minimum essential coverage,
  • Individuals who request premium tax credits are entitled to them, and
  • ALEs are meeting their shared responsibility (play or pay) obligations.

2017 Draft Forms and Instructions

Draft instructions for both the 1094-B and 1095-B and the 1094-C and 1095-C were released, as were the draft forms for 1094-B1095-B1094-C, and 1095-C. There are no substantive changes in the forms or instructions between 2016 and 2017, beyond the further removal of now-expired forms of transition relief.

In past years the IRS provided relief to employers who make a good faith effort to comply with the information reporting requirements and determined that they will not be subject to penalties for failure to correctly or completely file. This did not apply to employers that fail to timely file or furnish a statement. For 2017, the IRS has unofficially indicated that the “good faith compliance efforts” relating to reporting requirements will not be extended. Employers should be ready to fully meet the reporting requirements in early 2018 with a high degree of accuracy. There is however relief for de minimis errors on Line 15 of the 1095-C.

The IRS also confirmed there is no code for the Form 1095-C, Line 16 to indicate an individual waived an offer of coverage. The IRS also kept the “plan start month” box as an optional item for 2017 reporting.

Employers must remember to provide all printed forms in landscape, not portrait.

When? Which Employers?

Reporting will be due early in 2018, based on coverage in 2017.

For calendar year 2017, Forms 1094-C, 1095-C, 1094-B, and 1095-B must be filed by February 28, 2018, or April 2, 2018, if filing electronically. Statements to employees must be furnished by January 31, 2018. In late 2016, a filing deadline was provided for forms due in early 2017, however it is unknown if that extension will be provided for forms due in early 2018. Until employers are told otherwise, they should plan on meeting the current deadlines.

All reporting will be for the 2017 calendar year, even for non-calendar year plans. The reporting requirements are in Sections 6055 and 6056 of the ACA.

 

For an at-a-glance chart of all reporting requirements, as well as information on penalties for failure to file, 6055 requirements and instructions for certain boxes/lines on 1095C, request UBA’s ACA Advisor, “IRS Releases Draft Forms and Instructions for 2017 ACA Reporting“.

 

Read the original article here.

Source:

Capilla D. (5 October 2017). "IRS Releases Draft Forms and Instructions for 2017 ACA Reporting" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://blog.ubabenefits.com/irs-releases-draft-forms-and-instructions-for-2017-aca-reporting-1


HRL - Employees - Happy

Who’s using what in P&C insurance

With the emergence of 21st century technology, there are bountiful risks for the cyber lives of millions. In this article written by PROPERTYCASUALTY360, learn how different companies grow to combat the threat of employer risk.

You can read the original article here.


Guidewire Software, Inc. has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Cyence, a software company that applies data science and risk analytics to enable P&C insurers to grow by underwriting “21st century risks” that have gone underinsured or uninsured. These emerging risks include cyber, reputation, and new forms of business interruption risk. “As traditional actuarial approaches struggle to address the unique characteristics of emerging risks like cyber, Cyence’s next-generation approach will enable insurers to broaden the scope and value of the products their policyholders need,” , Guidewire Software CEO and Co-Founder Marcus Ryu said in a press release.

In other news from Guidewire: MetLife Auto & Home has begun deploying Guidewire’s InsurancePlatform™ in a new cloud environment for customers using its MetLife Auto & Home MyDirect portal. MetLife Auto & Home is the first P&C insurer in the United States to offer a 100-percent digital experience from quoting to claim service. Rollout of the platform is expected to continue over the next several quarters.

Hearsay Systems recently announced a strategic alliance with Microsoft to help financial services firms empower advisors to be both high-tech and high-touch at scale in the digital age. The companies will focus on addressing the specific challenges faced by financial institutions, including the need for compliant advisor-client engagement technology that will enable advisors to better manage client relationships and grow business. The alliance will bring together the data-driven relationship insights from Microsoft Dynamics 365 with the financial industry-specific workflows, data and compliance capabilities from Hearsay, allowing advisors to more effectively acquire, convert and deepen client relationships.

Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty® (AGCS) has teamed up with Silicon Valley-based software company Zeguro, whose mission is to simplify and streamline cyber security and risk management  in small to medium-sized businesses (SMBs). Through its easy-to-use platform, Zeguro will serve as a virtual Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) to those who purchase Allianz’s cyber insurance coverage to further manage their cyber exposure and decrease the overall risk of financial loss following a cyberattack.

Accenture and Duck Creek Technologies recently teamed up to create several new digital and emerging technology solutions for P&C insurers that are designed to improve efficiency and value. The companies have integrated Accenture’s IoT and analytics technologies with Duck Creek’s core platform and launched a blockchain proof-of-concept for medical bill auditing. “These new tools are the product of our focus on providing a new generation of digital solutions to our insurance clients working in collaboration with our joint venture partners,” Cindy DeArmond, managing director and P&C Core Platforms Lead for Accenture in North America, said in a press release.

Louisiana-based Aparicio Walker & Seeling, Inc. (AWS Insurance) is live on TechCanary’s insurance platform replacing its outdated legacy agency management system.  TechCanary’s breadth and depth of insurance functionality built in Salesforce and flexibility to easily customize it further were key to the decision.

Speedpay, Inc., a Western Union company, and Nordis Technologies recently announced an alliance to offer cloud-based customer communications management services to Speedpay clients. This strategic agreement provides current and future Speedpay clients with the opportunity to add Expresso®, an easy-to-use, self-service application to organize, automate and execute print and electronic communications. Nordis also delivers print/mail and email production services, thus enabling a seamless end-to-end communications solution.

 

You can read the original article here.

Source:

PropertyCasualty360 (9 October 2017). "Who’s using what in P&C insurance" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://www.propertycasualty360.com/2017/10/09/whos-using-what-in-pc-insurance-oct-9-2017?t=agency-technology?ref=channel-news