Covered Establishments in All States Must Now Submit OSHA Electronic Reports

HIGHLIGHTS

·      The electronic reporting rule now applies to all affected establishments, including establishments in states with OSHA-approved plans.

·      It does not matter whether the state has ratified the electronic reporting requirements.

·      The OSHA ITA is currently available and accepting reports on OSHA 300A forms with 2017 data.

IMPORTANT DATES

December 31, 2017

Due date for first OSHA electronic reports through ITA (submit 2016 data)

July 1, 2018

Due date for second OSHA electronic reports through ITA (submit 2017 data)

OVERVIEW

On April 30, 2018, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced it will require all establishments affected by the electronic reporting rule to submit their 2017 data to OSHA by July 1, 2018.

This announcement clarifies the requirement for establishments in states with an OSHA-approved plan. These establishments must submit electronic reports, regardless of whether the state has ratified or incorporated the electronic reporting rule into its OSHA state plan.

ACTION STEPS

Establishments in all states, including those with an OSHA-approved state plan, should prepare to submit electronic reports by July 1, 2018. Affected establishments can accomplish this by:

  • Becoming familiar with the requirements in the electronic reporting rule; and
  • Transitioning their OSHA records to an electronic format approved by the Injury Tracking Application (ITA)

OSHA Electronic Reporting

OSHA’s electronic reporting rule was issued in 2016. The rule requires establishments to report data from their injury and illness records to OSHA electronically if they:

  • Are already required to create and maintain OSHA injury and illness records and have 250 or more employees;
  • Have between 20 and 249 employees and belong to a high-risk industry; or
  • Receive a specific request from OSHA to create, maintain and submit electronic records, even if they would otherwise be exempt from OSHA recordkeeping requirements.

The electronic reporting rule applies to establishments, not employers. An employer may have several worksites or establishments. In these situations, some establishments may be affected while others are not.

To determine whether an establishment is affected, employers must determine each establishment’s peak employment during the calendar year. During this determination, employers must count every individual that worked at that establishment, regardless of whether he or she worked full-time, part-time, or was a temporary or seasonal worker.

OSHA-approved State Plans

The final rule required OSHA-approved state plans to adopt the electronic rule or “substantially identical” requirements within six months of the final rule’s publication date.

This means that OSHA-approved state plans have the authority to adopt reporting requirements that go above and beyond what is required by the federal rule. For this reason, establishments located in OSHA-approved state plan jurisdictions should consult with their local OSHA offices to make sure they are satisfying all electronic reporting requirements.

The OSHA-approved state plans shown on this map have not yet adopted the requirement to submit injury and illness reports electronically.

As a result, establishments in these states were not required to submit their 2016 data through the reporting website in 2017. However, OSHA has now clarified that they must submit their 2017 data in 2018.

All Employers
California

Maryland

Minnesota

South Carolina

Utah

Washington

Wyoming

Public Employers
Illinois

Maine

New Jersey

New York


Eliminate Electronic Distractions from the Workplace

It is a generally accepted fact that the use of cellphones and other electronic devices while driving present a distraction that greatly increases the chance for an accident. Unfortunately, what too many people fail to take into consideration is how distracting these devices can be in other situations.

In an industry of moving machinery and equipment, manufacturing workers are especially susceptible to workplace injury. They need to be alert at all times, as even the smallest slip-up can cause an accident. Not only can an inattentive worker injure themselves but their carelessness can also endanger others. In this type of work environment it is easy to see the importance of minimizing the potential distractions faced by your employees.

Cellphones

Whether it’s talking or texting, cellphone use takes the employees focus off their task. While handheld use compounds the problem, even using a hands-free device does not allow for full concentration. Studies indicate that the act of talking on the phone is distracting regardless of whether the user is physically holding the device or not. It is the conversation itself that takes an employee’s focus off their work and surroundings.

While some employees may need to use a work cellphone as part of their job, it is best to place restrictions on when and where those phones can be used. Personal cellphones should not be allowed on the manufacturing floor at all, as even the momentary distraction of a call or message alert can potentially lead to an accident. Employees should not have phones on their person during work hours unless they are on a break from their duties and are in a designated break area.

Attentive, focused employees are essential to creating a safe work environment. To reduce the chance for employee injury, it is important to keep the workplace free of distractions, such as cellphones and mp3 players.

Mp3 and Other Music Players

There are a variety of audio cues that alert workers to what is happening around them. Unfortunately, when an employee’s hearing is impaired by music, a shout from a coworker, an odd sound from a malfunctioning machine or the backup alarm on a truck or forklift can be easily missed. Besides limiting the worker’s ability to hear what is going on around them, there is also the potential distraction of operating the device. When adjusting volume or switching songs, not only is the employee’s hearing impaired, but they are also visually engaged with the device. This greatly decreases the worker’s awareness of his or her surroundings.

Potential Hearing Loss

In a manufacturing setting it is not uncommon for there to be high noise levels that require proper ear protection to prevent hearing loss. The use of cellphones, hands-free devices and headphones can interfere with an employee’s proper use of protective equipment. Even though such devices may cover the ear, most are not meant to provide hearing protection.

In fact, in noisy situations, devices that administer sound directly into the ear increase dangerous levels of noise exposure as employees turn up volume levels to drown out background noise. The combination of these noise exposures greatly increases the rate of hearing loss, which in turn increases the chance for occupational hearing loss claims.

Electronics Usage Policy

Attentive, focused employees are essential to creating a safe work environment, which is why it is important to eliminate possible distractions. Prohibiting employee use of personal electronic devices can aid in reducing workplace accidents. To clearly state your company’s rules on when and where usage is restricted, institute an electronics usage policy. Once instituted, train your employees in the policy requirements and make sure restrictions are diligently enforced.


Construction Risk Advisor: September 2018

Industry Overspending $177 Billion Per Year

The average time construction professionals in the U.S. spend on avoidable issues like conflict resolution, rework and looking for project data costs the industry over $177 billion annually, according to a new report.

The participants surveyed for the report said they spend 65 percent of their time on “optimal” activities like communicating with stakeholders and optimizing resources that keep projects on track. They spend the remaining 35 percent of their time on “nonoptimal” tasks like hunting down project information, resolving conflicts and dealing with mistakes that require rework. That amounts to almost two full working days lost per person each week.

Some of the reasons for the nonoptimal costs include poor communication, constrained access to data, incorrect data and the lack of an easy way to share data with stakeholders. Another possible reason is that more than 80 percent of the survey’s respondents said they don’t use mobile devices to collaborate and access project data, despite the fact that mobile devices could help them work more efficiently.

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States Say Contractors Must Guarantee Wages

Maryland’s General Contractor Liability for Unpaid Wages Act becomes effective on Oct. 1, making private contractors for prime construction projects in the state financially responsible for unpaid wages of subcontractor employees. And unless the reason for nonpayment is related to a legitimate dispute, general contractors could be held responsible for up to three times the amount owed, plus attorney fees.

California and Oregon also enacted similar laws earlier this year. In California, general contractors are now liable for the unpaid wages of any employee who furnishes labor to or through them, plus unpaid benefits and interest.

Oregon’s wage protection law creates liability for the general contractor only if the worker’s subcontractor employer has not yet been paid in full.

Mitigating The Risk

In order to reduce the risk of general contractors having to pay their subcontractors’ employee wages, some industry experts are recommending that subcontractors provide their own payment bonds.

Opponents of the recent laws argue that it could be difficult for subcontractors on rocky financial ground to meet bond underwriting requirements. And since large projects could require several new bonds per job, overall project costs could increase significantly. Plus, if subcontractors don’t pay up, prime contractors will have to pay twice for the same labor.


Agriculture Risk Advisor: September/October 2018

3 Tips For Hiring Farm Labor

With some farmers struggling to find reliable farm labor, it is important to invest some thought in the hiring process. Here are some tips for finding the right help:

  1. Examine your needs. You might have a general idea in your head of what work needs to be done, but it’s best to be specific. Narrow down broad processes into specific jobs so you can determine how much help you truly need.
  2. Think about desired traits. Do you need someone to fill a temporary need, or are you hoping that person can go on to fill a managerial role? You’ll have to determine whether people skills are more important than manual labor or machinery skills, and list those traits in your job description.
  3. Consider hiring for a trial period. If you’re hesitant about a candidate but need immediate help, consider hiring them for a short-term trial period. This saves you from high employee turnover while buying you time to recognize your needs. It allows both you and the worker to communicate any frustrations and expectations after the trial period before considering whether the working relationship is worth investing in long term.

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Rise Of Robotics In Farming

Producers are increasingly considering using farming robots to replace human workers who either can’t or aren’t interested in picking crops. Agriculture is a prime market for robotics since it is less regulated than other industries.

Robots Needed To Fill Unwanted Jobs

Farming’s labor crunch is a global problem, and industry experts expect things to get worse in the years to come. Produce growers are struggling to man the fields, and higher wages aren’t persuading people to perform the physically demanding tasks.

According to the Department of Labor, the 2017 median pay for an agricultural worker was $11.41 per hour. In California, farm wages can top $20 per hour. But this is still not enough to attract laborers at a sufficient level.

Advances In Farming Technology

Driscoll’s, one of America’s largest produce distributors, has been testing a robot made by Harvest CROO Robotics, a Florida-based startup. The robot is capable of covering 8 acres in a single day and replacing a team of more than 30 human pickers.

Another emerging farming technology is a “no-touch” vineyard developed by researchers at UC Davis, which waters vines and picks fruit while improving yields, quality and costs. It costs about 7 cents in labor per vine to manage the touchless vineyard, compared to $1 per vine in a conventional vineyard.

Although robotics isn’t expected to steal all of the farming labor jobs, experts believe it could still be a disruptive technology, requiring a change in the way traditional growers operate.


Safety Focused Newsletter: September 2018

Staying Safe When Traveling for Work

Many jobs require employees to travel for work, sometimes even abroad. While this can be a fun experience, staying safe can be much more difficult if you are in an unfamiliar area. To keep yourself safe when traveling for work, remember the following tips:

  • Familiarize yourself with local customs and laws, as you are subject to them while traveling.
  • Avoid hailing taxis on the street when possible. Instead, have your hotel’s concierge service book a reliable driver or car service for you.

Research is essential when it comes to ensuring a successful business trip and maintaining your safety.

  • Keep hotel doors and windows locked at all times. When you arrive, and any time you leave and return to the room, make sure the locks are working.
  • Ensure that your room has a working peephole and use it to verify the identity of anyone visiting your room. If an unexpected visitor claims to be a hotel employee, call the front desk to confirm.
  • Take photos of important documents and information, like your passport and driver’s license, and leave copies at home.

Research is essential when it comes to ensuring a successful business trip. Planning ahead and remaining vigilant can make all the difference.

Ways to Communicate with Peers You Disagree With

In your professional career, you’re bound to have to work alongside people you don’t agree with. For some, this can be a source of stress, particularly if you have to go out of your way to keep the workplace relationship civil.

In these situations, it’s important to know how to interact professionally. Not only will this display a high level of maturity to your co-workers and managers, but it can also help you avoid making a bad situation worse.

To work with peers you disagree with, do the following:

  • Listen more than you speak. Diversity of opinions is important, and allowing yourself the time to process what another person wants can help you understand where they’re coming from.
  • Think before you respond. Choose your words carefully when responding to something you disagree with. Doing so ensures that you can justify your arguments in a sincere, respectful tone.
  • Try to find common ground and avoid dragging others into an argument.
  • Avoid personal insults. Discussions should be civil and focus on workplace issues.
  • Ask questions. Sometimes disagreements come from a lack of understanding. Asking questions in a friendly tone can be a good way to steer a conversation into a more positive direction.

Working with people you disagree with can be difficult, but it’s an important part of most jobs. If you are concerned that you and a peer will never get along, consider speaking to a supervisor.

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Safety Focused Newsletter - August 2018

Lower back injuries caused by improper lifting are some of the most common work-related injuries.

Safety Tips for Proper Lifting

Lifting is a common activity in the workplace—an activity that can be potentially dangerous if the proper techniques are not used. In fact, lower back injuries caused by improper lifting are some of the most common work-related injuries.

In order to protect yourself when lifting heavy items in the workplace, do the following:

  • Look over the load. Decide if you can handle it alone or if you need assistance. When in doubt, ask for help. Moving an object that is too heavy or bulky can cause severe injury.
  • Clear away any potential obstacles before carrying an object.
  • Use good foot positioning. Your feet should be shoulder-width apart.
  • Bend your knees. Bending over at the waist to reach for an object you want to lift puts strain on your back, shoulder and neck muscles.
  • Keep your arms and elbows as close to your body as you can while lifting.
  • Use your feet to change direction. Don’t twist your body.

Responding to a Workplace Accident

Accidents in the workplace can occur without warning, and it’s important to respond quickly to help those in need. In some cases, supervisors may not be around to provide the proper response guidance, and it’s up to employees to take action.

The following are some general tips to keep in mind if a co-worker is involved in a workplace accident:

  • Take control of the scene and try to restore order.
  • Call for emergency services if needed. Provide any immediate first aid, if you are qualified to do so.
  • Protect co-workers from potential secondary accidents. You can accomplish this by dismissing unnecessary personnel and denying access to the area.
  • Identify people at the scene. If they witnessed the incident, be sure to make a note of their names, as they can provide a report on what happened at a later date.
  • Notify upper management of the issue.
  • Do not put yourself in harm’s way.

Following an accident, follow up with your supervisor to ensure the appropriate paperwork is completed. Supervisors may require you to file an accident report or further detail what happened.

If you have any ideas of how the accident could have been avoided, share them with your supervisor or at a safety meeting. If your workplace does not have a first responder program in place, it may a good idea to suggest it to your employer.

Trained first-aid responders can provide immediate care to workers who become ill or injured on the job. The quick response and training of these individuals can make all the difference following an accident.

Common First-Aid Kit Supplies

  • Sterile Saline Solution
  • Antibiotic Ointment
  • Gauze and Wraps
  • Scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Disposable gloves
  • Asprin

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Meeting cybersecurity risks head-on: A guide to breach preparedness

How would you manage a data breach? No company is immune to cyberattacks and data breaches. Read on to learn how you can prepare your business.


Gauging a company’s true data breach risk from the outside is a difficult endeavor for insurers, with challenges both technical and informational. But even less attention has been paid to how companies would manage a breach if it happened, which has an enormous impact on the toll of the final damage.

See also: Analyze Your Risks with Hierl's Cyber Security Advisors

No organization is immune to breach. If the National Security Agency can lose data, anyone can lose data, yet the scope of the current issue is still astounding.

According to another insurance company's 2017 cyber readiness report, 72% of large U.S. businesses — nearly three out of four — and 68% of small- and mid-sized businesses — about seven in ten — reported cyber incidents in the previous year. Among these, close to half (47%) experienced two or more cyber incidents during that same time.

The largest breaches, affecting big-name companies like Equifax, Target, Home Depot and many others, drew substantial headlines because of the huge number of identities involved. But almost every business holds some sensitive information, either regarding its customers or its own intellectual property, finances or employees. In fact, smaller organizations often lack the internal resources to dedicate towards preparedness, making them very attractive targets for hackers.

Assessing the threats to your business

The first challenge with measuring a company’s risk exposure relates to the industrywide problem of tying compliance and policy to actual security. A company may have checked all the right boxes on paper, but doing so guarantees little about their actual cyber risk position.

The second issue is that people often matter much more than technology.

The public conversation focuses on high-profile hacking events, but data breaches are even more likely to be the result of internal issues, including breakdowns in training, procedure or plain old mistakes.

The overwhelming majority of all cyber attacks are successfully executed with information stolen from employees who unwittingly give away their system ID and access credentials to hackers or provide a gateway via a malware link embedded in some form of communication.

One of the most important components of an effective data breach readiness program is mandatory and frequent training to remind employees about the importance of security awareness.

See also: Your Cyber Liability Policy & Handling Data Breaches Like A Pro

Education information security best practices can help arm a team against threats such as phishing, man-in-the-middle attacks, malware, and ransomware, substantially lowering the long-term risk.

An accurate understanding of a company’s sector-specific risks is another important point of departure in corporate cybersecurity. Healthcare employees, for instance, need to be especially on guard for EHR-related attacks and RDP server breaches, like the ones instigated by the SamSam virus (which took down Allscripts last month).

Other industries are more vulnerable to loopholes in common business apps; still, others are more frequently victims of point-of-sale malware or e-mail phishing scams. Once businesses understand where and how they are most likely to be targeted, they can begin providing training that takes into account the need for added vigilance in these specific areas.

The final challenge in correctly identifying breach risk involves understanding the extent to which recovery costs can vary. Discrepancies in cost depend not only on the severity of the breach, but also on how well the organization responds. Globally, the average cost to recover from a security breach is $158 per impacted individual, but that varies from of $60 to $400 per person.

While more companies than ever before are now either considering or have taken out some form of cyber insurance, this should not be considered an unloadable risk. Smart organizations are increasingly focusing on proactively identifying data breaches and preparing to efficiently react to them in advance of a data breach crisis.

Proper preparation means more education

The most devastating impacts of a data breach can only be avoided by coupling breach awareness and prevention efforts with readiness and response planning ahead of a cybersecurity incident.

Comprehensive breach readiness plans break down both pre-emptive and retrospective action steps by department: it’s sensible, for example, to task IT personnel with monitoring cloud connectivity and identifying network loopholes while entrusting financial staff with detecting suspicious activity along company bank and credit accounts.

Customer relations experts and account managers, on the other hand, are likely the best resources for overseeing client communications during and after a data breach, helping to re-establish trust and informing their consumer-facing workforce.

Here, inter-departmental communication is paramount: all workers should understand how and to whom they are to report possible breaches or scams, and when such breaches occur, the entire company should know what to expect employees in every department to do next.

Even for the most cyber-savvy corporations, however, internal resources alone are not enough these days. Outside resources are often critical to mitigating the threat of cyber attacks; Stop them once they start and restore company functions in a breach’s aftermath.

Establishing relationships and negotiating agreements with external subject matter experts is better done far in advance of an actual data breach. Contractual terms can be negotiated without the chaos and urgency of a crisis situation. The same is true for interfacing with law enforcement and regulatory agencies.

Knowing whom to contact and having an established communication chain can pay off when trying to execute an urgent data breach response.

See also: 5 Ways to Spot a Phishing Email

Both internally and externally, the human element of cybersecurity remains a business’s best defense across an ever-widening threat landscape. With the right planning and a rapid response team, companies should be able to withstand a breach with the least damage possible, limiting losses – and claims.

SOURCE: Thompson, J. (2 March 2018) "Meeting cybersecurity risks head-on: A guide to breach preparedness" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from https://www.propertycasualty360.com/2018/03/02/meeting-cybersecurity-risks-head-on-a-guide-to-bre/


Construction Risk Advisor - July 2018 Edition

DATA SCIENCE TO BOOST EFFICIENCY AND SAFETY


In order to improve worker safety and boost efficiency, about 20 construction companies have launched data science initiatives over the past few years.

One of those pioneers is a Boston-based company whose data scientists have developed an algorithm that analyzes photos from its job sites and then scans them for safety hazards. The algorithm then correlates those images with its accident records.

Although the technology still needs some fine-tuning, the company hopes to use the algorithm to rate project risks. As a result, the technology could prove extremely helpful in detecting elevated threats and then intervening with safety briefings.

Combining the data collected from these efforts could also be used to forecast project delays. Although data science is somewhat new to construction, a recent McKinsey report said that firms could boost productivity by as much as 50 percent through real- time analysis of data.

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AVOIDABLE ESTIMATION MISTAKES IN CONSTRUCTION


In the past three years, only 31 percent of construction projects came within 10 percent of their budgets, according to RSMeans, a provider of construction cost information. Completing projects within budget is a constant challenge for many contractors. Here are five estimating mistakes to be aware of, along with best practices to combat them.

1. Unrealistic expectations—Don’t rely on ideal orworst-case scenarios, which can lead to impractical estimates. Find the middle ground to avoid setting expectations too high and blowing timelines.

2. Flying solo—Don’t be afraid to use outside data sources from a credible third party. Create a realistic estimate by including a combination of your own historical data and their custom data.

3. Lack of or wrong permits—If you lack permits or have the wrong type, work can come to a standstill. Factor proper permits into your estimate, as well as their corresponding costs.

4. Unclear parameters—Parameters must be established clearly at the onset of each project.Make sure you clearly understand your clients’limitations and restrictions before creating an estimate to avoid unnecessary change orders.

5. Missing details—A lack of knowledge, missing items or generalized task descriptions can lead to estimates that are too low. Take the time to account for all necessary materials, labor and equipment by referencing similar work done in the past or detailed cost data from a third party.


Cyber Risks and Liabilities July/August 2018

Training Staff to Guard Against Cyber Attacks


Using mobile devices to work remotely is becoming the new norm. But when your employees use phones, tablets and laptops to access your networkand do their jobs, they’re essentially providinghackers with more entry points, leaving your organization highly vulnerable to attacks.

No matter how many security measures you take,they’re useless if you don’t supplement them withemployee training. Here are five ways to help employees protect your company from cyber attacks:

  1. Offer training on phishing and spam. Show your employees what to look for so they can alert IT if they receive a suspicious email. You can also use phishing simulator training tools, which attempt to trick your employees into opening the wrong types of email. The employees who click on those emails can then be flagged for additional training.
  2. Provide strong password training. Passwords should be changed on a regular basis and contain more than seven characters, an uppercase letter, a number and a symbol.
  3. Teach employees to report problems. Even if your employees clicked on something they shouldn’t have, it’s important that they feel comfortable reporting their infractions so any potential threat can be addressed immediately.
  4. Insist that your employees update all software when new updates become available.Vulnerabilities spread like wildfire among hackers. If employees fail to perform updates,they’re allowing hackers access to the device and possibly your entire network.
  5. Give remote access and Wi-Fi training and set up a virtual private network (VPN). Any employee that works remotely should use that VPN at all times for all activities.

Businesses Need Both Cyber Threat Intelligence and Business Risk Intelligence


Devising an all-encompassing strategy that protects your organization from cyber criminals, data breaches and other cyber security threats is no easy task. You need to ensure protection from not only hackers, but also the actions of your own staff.

Your employees may not intentionally threaten your organization, but without proper training and policies on using, storing and transferring data, there will always be a chance of them inadvertently putting your business at risk. In order to protect against such threats and react accordingly, businesses need to two types of intelligence: cyber threat intelligence and business risk intelligence.

Cyber Threat Intelligence

Cyber threat intelligence is information that has been collected, evaluated and analyzed. It involves looking outward, always being on the defense for potential cyber threats and turning unknown threats into well-known, mitigated threats. Cyber threat intelligence helps organizations understand the threat landscape they face and improve the effectiveness of their defense.

Cyber security analysts can use the data from their own internal security systems and outside vendors to build an understanding of the threats they face. They may also enlist the help of outside providers who understand the behavior of cyber criminals, as well as the long-term trends and short-term risks that might affect a particular sector.

Business Risk Intelligence

Business risk intelligence addresses the broader risks facing a business, including the digital risks. Due to the connected nature of the “internet of things,” business risk intelligence can also include cyber threat intelligence. But unlike cyber threat intelligence—which primarily affects the day-to-day operations of a company’s chief information security officer—the impact of business risk intelligence is likely to be felt across the entire executive suite.

A company with business risk intelligence is aware of the broad risks it faces. That may include insider threats to the physical security of staff or the risk of engaging with third-party vendors in the supply chain. Any type of activity that can alter business operations can be combatted with business risk intelligence.

Save Your Website from ADA Lawsuits


The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 prohibits discrimination based on disability, which involves ensuring that everyone has reasonable access to all areas of public life. Although the ADA doesn’t explicitly mention the internet, the federalgovernment has taken the position that Title III of the ADA covers access to websites of public accommodations, including service and rental establishments, retail stores, educational institutions and recreational facilities.

Currently, ADA website compliance is only mandatory for government-managed websites. However, the absence of laws enforcing ADA compliance for websites ofpublic accommodations hasn’t prevented people from filing lawsuits againstcompanies that don’t meet the suggested guidelines.

Businesses in health care, government and education have been the most common targets of these lawsuits. Attorneys looking for easy money typically target small businesses’ websites by offering a low settlement fee. If your business is targeted by an ADA website compliance grievance, consider taking the following steps in response:

  1. Review the grievance for credibility. A lawsuit may likely begin by citing“violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Title 42 U.S.C. 12101 and12181.” It may also include an inexpensive settlement option—a prime indicator that the lawsuit has no legs to stand on and is likely a scam.
  2. Consult a lawyer. Doing so will help determine the credibility of the threat and stop future threats to your business.
  3. Respond to the plaintiff. Ask your attorney to draft something explaining thatyou’ve reviewed their grievance and consulted a lawyer. Realizing that you’vesought legal help may scare away anyone trying to file a lawsuit.
  4. Update your website. Do this regardless of whether there is a legal need. If your site is easily accessible by people with disabilities, you may see beneficial returns from those users.

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Safety Focused Newsletter - July 2018

Back Strain: A Workplace Risk for Every Employee


Back injuries are common in the workplace and are typically the result of a strain or sprain to back ligaments or muscles, the spinal cord, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, sacrum or coccyx. What’s more, you don’t need to work in a manual labor-intensive job to experience back problems. Employees of all kinds can maintain back health by keeping these tips in mind during their workday:

  • Take small breaks throughout your workday and stretch regularly.
  • Manage your stress level to reduce discomfort and back pain.
  • Exercise and stay active to reduce your chances of developing back pain.
  • Adjust your posture frequently.
  • Position your desk chair so your feet are flat on the floor.
  • Lift with your knees, and keep what you are lifting close to your body. Ask a co-worker to assist you when performing tasks that require heavy lifting, pushing, pulling or throwing.
  • Drink enough water and eat a healthy diet. This helps keep your spinal discs hydrated and healthy.
  • Watch where you walk. Many back strain injuries are the result of involuntary motion, like an attempt to recover from a slip.It may also be a good idea to work with your manager to plan your working hours in a way that helps you avoid long periods of repetitive work.

EMPLOYEES DO NOT NEED TO WORK IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY OR A MANUAL LABOR- INTENSIVE JOB TO EXPERIENCE BACK PROBLEMS.

5 WAYS TO IMPROVE COMMUNICATION

  1. AVOID CLICHÉS
  2. BE BRIEF
  3. BE SINCERE
  4. AVOID ARGUMENTS
  5. ALLOW OTHERS TO RESPOND WITHOUT INTERRUPTION

How Employees Can Improve Workplace Communication


Communication is key in all aspects of life, but especially in the workplace. Without good communication, employees and productivity can suffer.

However, there are things you can do to establish better communication and improve the way things are done at your workplace. When it comes to interacting with your co-workers, keep in mind the following:

Make sure you are being clear and concise.

This applies not only to face-to-face conversations, but also to emails and all other types of communication. Your messages should be complete and include everything you want to convey.

Listen carefully. Don’t respond to what someone has said—aloud or in your head—until they have finished speaking. If you start thinking about a response before your co- worker has gotten their message across, you could miss important pieces of information and derail the conversation.

Summarize what you’ve said. After you’vegiven a long-winded speech or written an extensive email, go over the basic, most important points. This will help refresh yourlistener’s memory and potentially weed outopportunities for miscommunication.

Make meetings meaningful. Schedule a meeting to elaborate on complex tasks and make the most of scheduled time. Don’tstray from the topic, and keep conversations productive.

Follow up in writing. No matter how compelling a meeting or conversation was, it’s likely that people will not remember everything that was shared. For important matters, follow up with an email that highlights key takeaways from the conversation or meeting.

Above all, it’s important to be mindful ofyour body language and tone when you communicate. Together, these strategies ensure clear, effective correspondence.

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