Cyber Risks and Liabilities July/August 2018

Training Staff to Guard Against Cyber Attacks


Using mobile devices to work remotely is becoming the new norm. But when your employees use phones, tablets and laptops to access your networkand do their jobs, they’re essentially providinghackers with more entry points, leaving your organization highly vulnerable to attacks.

No matter how many security measures you take,they’re useless if you don’t supplement them withemployee training. Here are five ways to help employees protect your company from cyber attacks:

  1. Offer training on phishing and spam. Show your employees what to look for so they can alert IT if they receive a suspicious email. You can also use phishing simulator training tools, which attempt to trick your employees into opening the wrong types of email. The employees who click on those emails can then be flagged for additional training.
  2. Provide strong password training. Passwords should be changed on a regular basis and contain more than seven characters, an uppercase letter, a number and a symbol.
  3. Teach employees to report problems. Even if your employees clicked on something they shouldn’t have, it’s important that they feel comfortable reporting their infractions so any potential threat can be addressed immediately.
  4. Insist that your employees update all software when new updates become available.Vulnerabilities spread like wildfire among hackers. If employees fail to perform updates,they’re allowing hackers access to the device and possibly your entire network.
  5. Give remote access and Wi-Fi training and set up a virtual private network (VPN). Any employee that works remotely should use that VPN at all times for all activities.

Businesses Need Both Cyber Threat Intelligence and Business Risk Intelligence


Devising an all-encompassing strategy that protects your organization from cyber criminals, data breaches and other cyber security threats is no easy task. You need to ensure protection from not only hackers, but also the actions of your own staff.

Your employees may not intentionally threaten your organization, but without proper training and policies on using, storing and transferring data, there will always be a chance of them inadvertently putting your business at risk. In order to protect against such threats and react accordingly, businesses need to two types of intelligence: cyber threat intelligence and business risk intelligence.

Cyber Threat Intelligence

Cyber threat intelligence is information that has been collected, evaluated and analyzed. It involves looking outward, always being on the defense for potential cyber threats and turning unknown threats into well-known, mitigated threats. Cyber threat intelligence helps organizations understand the threat landscape they face and improve the effectiveness of their defense.

Cyber security analysts can use the data from their own internal security systems and outside vendors to build an understanding of the threats they face. They may also enlist the help of outside providers who understand the behavior of cyber criminals, as well as the long-term trends and short-term risks that might affect a particular sector.

Business Risk Intelligence

Business risk intelligence addresses the broader risks facing a business, including the digital risks. Due to the connected nature of the “internet of things,” business risk intelligence can also include cyber threat intelligence. But unlike cyber threat intelligence—which primarily affects the day-to-day operations of a company’s chief information security officer—the impact of business risk intelligence is likely to be felt across the entire executive suite.

A company with business risk intelligence is aware of the broad risks it faces. That may include insider threats to the physical security of staff or the risk of engaging with third-party vendors in the supply chain. Any type of activity that can alter business operations can be combatted with business risk intelligence.

Save Your Website from ADA Lawsuits


The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 prohibits discrimination based on disability, which involves ensuring that everyone has reasonable access to all areas of public life. Although the ADA doesn’t explicitly mention the internet, the federalgovernment has taken the position that Title III of the ADA covers access to websites of public accommodations, including service and rental establishments, retail stores, educational institutions and recreational facilities.

Currently, ADA website compliance is only mandatory for government-managed websites. However, the absence of laws enforcing ADA compliance for websites ofpublic accommodations hasn’t prevented people from filing lawsuits againstcompanies that don’t meet the suggested guidelines.

Businesses in health care, government and education have been the most common targets of these lawsuits. Attorneys looking for easy money typically target small businesses’ websites by offering a low settlement fee. If your business is targeted by an ADA website compliance grievance, consider taking the following steps in response:

  1. Review the grievance for credibility. A lawsuit may likely begin by citing“violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Title 42 U.S.C. 12101 and12181.” It may also include an inexpensive settlement option—a prime indicator that the lawsuit has no legs to stand on and is likely a scam.
  2. Consult a lawyer. Doing so will help determine the credibility of the threat and stop future threats to your business.
  3. Respond to the plaintiff. Ask your attorney to draft something explaining thatyou’ve reviewed their grievance and consulted a lawyer. Realizing that you’vesought legal help may scare away anyone trying to file a lawsuit.
  4. Update your website. Do this regardless of whether there is a legal need. If your site is easily accessible by people with disabilities, you may see beneficial returns from those users.

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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Safety Focused Newsletter - July 2018

Back Strain: A Workplace Risk for Every Employee


Back injuries are common in the workplace and are typically the result of a strain or sprain to back ligaments or muscles, the spinal cord, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, sacrum or coccyx. What’s more, you don’t need to work in a manual labor-intensive job to experience back problems. Employees of all kinds can maintain back health by keeping these tips in mind during their workday:

  • Take small breaks throughout your workday and stretch regularly.
  • Manage your stress level to reduce discomfort and back pain.
  • Exercise and stay active to reduce your chances of developing back pain.
  • Adjust your posture frequently.
  • Position your desk chair so your feet are flat on the floor.
  • Lift with your knees, and keep what you are lifting close to your body. Ask a co-worker to assist you when performing tasks that require heavy lifting, pushing, pulling or throwing.
  • Drink enough water and eat a healthy diet. This helps keep your spinal discs hydrated and healthy.
  • Watch where you walk. Many back strain injuries are the result of involuntary motion, like an attempt to recover from a slip.It may also be a good idea to work with your manager to plan your working hours in a way that helps you avoid long periods of repetitive work.

EMPLOYEES DO NOT NEED TO WORK IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY OR A MANUAL LABOR- INTENSIVE JOB TO EXPERIENCE BACK PROBLEMS.

5 WAYS TO IMPROVE COMMUNICATION

  1. AVOID CLICHÉS
  2. BE BRIEF
  3. BE SINCERE
  4. AVOID ARGUMENTS
  5. ALLOW OTHERS TO RESPOND WITHOUT INTERRUPTION

How Employees Can Improve Workplace Communication


Communication is key in all aspects of life, but especially in the workplace. Without good communication, employees and productivity can suffer.

However, there are things you can do to establish better communication and improve the way things are done at your workplace. When it comes to interacting with your co-workers, keep in mind the following:

Make sure you are being clear and concise.

This applies not only to face-to-face conversations, but also to emails and all other types of communication. Your messages should be complete and include everything you want to convey.

Listen carefully. Don’t respond to what someone has said—aloud or in your head—until they have finished speaking. If you start thinking about a response before your co- worker has gotten their message across, you could miss important pieces of information and derail the conversation.

Summarize what you’ve said. After you’vegiven a long-winded speech or written an extensive email, go over the basic, most important points. This will help refresh yourlistener’s memory and potentially weed outopportunities for miscommunication.

Make meetings meaningful. Schedule a meeting to elaborate on complex tasks and make the most of scheduled time. Don’tstray from the topic, and keep conversations productive.

Follow up in writing. No matter how compelling a meeting or conversation was, it’s likely that people will not remember everything that was shared. For important matters, follow up with an email that highlights key takeaways from the conversation or meeting.

Above all, it’s important to be mindful ofyour body language and tone when you communicate. Together, these strategies ensure clear, effective correspondence.

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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Agriculture Risk Advisor- July/August 2018

FARM BILL UPDATE


On June 13, in a 20-1 vote, a Senate panel approved a modest, bipartisan rewrite of federal farm and nutrition programs. The sole vote against the bill was by Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, because his amendment to limit subsidy payments was omitted.

If passed, the legislation would renew farm programs that include subsidies for crop insurance, farm credit and land conservation. It would also extend the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)—formerly known as the Food Stamp Program—which helps feed more than 40 million people.

The House failed to pass a version of this bill in May due to a still unresolved immigration debate. Contrary to the Senate farm bill, the House is asking for greater job training opportunities for SNAP recipients. However, the bill has been heavily criticized for what some call a poor design and the possibility that it could exclude 2 million people from SNAP.

The current food and farm bill expires at the end of September. Although enacting the legislation this year is unlikely, a short-term extension is expected when the bill is brought back to the floor.

NEW WEB TOOLS FOR CATTLE MARKET


Two new web tools created by the Noble Research Institute will allow cattle producers to easily access Oklahoma cattle auction data. The tools include a price slide table and market charts.

PRICE SLIDE TABLE

The first web tool is a breakdown of the price slide (PS) and value of gain (VOG) for the reported markets. The PS and VOG tool looks at the sales receipts for the selected market, as well as frame size, gender, yield grade and the sale date to give producers a glimpse at the type of cattle buyers are looking for.

Cattle with notes about their features aren’t included in the table in order to prevent the PS and VOG from being affected. However, a link to the original USDA- AMS report is provided near the top of the page for producers who want more details and to see where the original data was taken from.

MARKET CHARTS

The second web tool is a set of charts for slaughter, feeder and replacement cattle. The tool offers an option to compare each group across whichever markets the user selects, either during a specific year or across years.

The auction comparison tool was designed to provide producers with information to help them in their marketing and purchasing options. By comparing years, producers can better evaluate how the current year is stacking up against previous years for a particular market.

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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The Importance of Business Continuity Planning

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Rarely do we ever get advanced notice that a disaster is prepared to strike. Weather, network failures, epidemics and violence are just a few of the disasters that could have an impact on a company’s reputation. Every incident is unique due to the challenges it presents. However, implementing a business continuity plan (BCP) can help give your organization the best shot at success both during and after a disaster. A current, tested plan in the hands of all personnel responsible can help mitigate the potential impact. The absence of a plan doesn’t just mean your organization will take longer than necessary to recover from a crisis – you could go out of business. In this installment of CenterStage, Cathleen Christensen, our VP of Property and Casualty, discusses what a BCP is, why it matters, keeping one in place, and how Hierl can help you build a strategy that works with it.

What is a Business Continuity Plan?

Business continuity refers to maintaining business functions or resuming them in a timely manner in the event of a crisis. Examples of crises include natural disasters such as weather, fire, or an epidemic outbreak like the flu, but also include events involving company reputation, violence and network breaches. A business continuity plan outlines the procedures and instructions an organization must follow in the face of such disasters. The plan not only identifies the internal and external needs of an organization after a catastrophic loss but lays out the path for recovery. Cathleen explains, “A business continuity plan can be the difference between successfully recovering or going out of business.”

Why Does Business Continuity Planning Matter?

The importance of having a business continuity plan cannot be stressed enough. Truth is, 1 in 5 organizations do not recover following a crisis. Severity vs. probability must be factored into the management of your organization. The purpose of having a business continuity plan is not only to prepare for a disaster both during and after, but to mitigate the potential danger and lessen the odds of attack for your organization. Serving as the ultimate disaster plan, it is vital that preparation information is made common knowledge amongst all levels of the organization - from the highest level down. To ensure a healthy and effective BCP, craft a plan following these seven steps:

1. Initial Response

Disruption in the day-to-day operations should trigger everyone to not only know what is wrong, but what – if anything – to do to resolve it immediately. Planning and exercising this element of the plan will eliminate the rush of, “What do I do,” from employees. Proper communication will allow there to be no holes in the plan.

The initial response should also provide a clear sense of who is in ‘charge’ when disaster strikes. Whether it be at a corporate level, regionally or locally, knowing who is overseeing the process towards recovery is vital to the success of a BCP.

2. Stabilization

Regardless of cause, every disruption needs containment to prevent a bad situation from getting worse. It is important to know what happened to cause the event and the potential impact it may bring if left unchecked. Assess the impact, know how to stop the bleeding and devise short and medium-term goals to appropriately address the situation.

3. Activation

Following an impact assessment, identify what services need to be restored. Additionally, note who is responsible for the plan – what will they do, where will they do it and with whom will they do it?

4. Communication

In the event of a disaster, stakeholders might initiate various actions to stabilize or restore services. Timely communication between various respondents is critical to an effective incident response. Communication during an incident should be geared towards management, employees, customers and others who have a stake in the business. The goal is to keep them updated regarding the current state of restoration activities and collaboration with responders.

5. Planned Response

These are the initial response activities that need to be taken to limit the loss of life and property in the time immediately before, during, and after a crisis. Items that could be included are:

  • What types of incidents or crisis situations activate the plan?
  • Who has authority to activate it?
  • Details regarding the incident response team
  • Evacuation procedures
  • Contact lists

6. Extended Response

Actual recovery may take days, weeks, months or even longer. After the initial response the recovery plan outlines the steps you will need to take to get your business running again after an incident or crisis. It includes a realistic time frame in which you can get your operations back on track to minimize financial losses. Forcing yourself to rely heavily on your initial or planned response will only worsen recovery efforts. Be knowledgeable about your staff and the direction the road to recovery is going.

7. Return to Normal

When disruption ends, questions will still need to be answered. These are not limited to questions such as, Is the return to ‘normal’ a ‘new normal’. Other questions could include, “How will work between ‘normal’ operations and post-catch up tasks be managed? How will my information for insurance purposes be collected?”

Maintaining a Business Continuity Plan

With a plan in place, efforts do not cease. To remain disaster ready, you must remain active in your preventative efforts. As the world around us changes, so should your BCP to remain up to date and effective in all threats. Communicating any changes that may have occurred with initial plan to employees is a must. There is no way for all members of your organization to remain ‘in the know’ if they are kept uninformed. With effective communication of the BCP comes proper training. As critical as communicating clearly is with employees, instructing them in a hands-on potential scenario leaves nobody in the dark on recovery execution when disaster strikes.

How Can Hierl Help Business Continuity Planning?

At Hierl, we offer the necessary tools for creating an effective BCP. By working hand-in-hand with your business/organization, we offer the resources to locate and analyze potential risks and to create a team within your business to properly manage disasters. To get started, speak with Cathleen today at 920-921-5921 or cchristensen@hierl.com.

 

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Construction Risk Advisor - June 2018 Edition

ARE SIGNING BONUSES ENOUGH TO KEEP WORKERS?


As the shortage of skilled labor in construction continues, it’s becoming more common for contractors to offer one-time bonuses to attract skilled workers. In fact, according to the Associated General Contractors of America, close to one-quarter of contractors reported using bonuses to attract employees, ranging between a few hundred dollars to over $1,500 per worker.

What employers like about bonuses is that they’re one-time payments that don’t affect employees’ base pay. However, there is a drawback to offering an incentive for getting skilled workers in the door—there’s no proof that they’ll stay, especially if they can easily find another job elsewhere. Workers can stay long enough to collect the bonus but then leave for another opportunity, and yet another bonus.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, construction pay in the U.S. only rose by a meager 2.4 percent in 2017, even though construction costs are increasing. Unless employers offer competitive pay, it may be difficult to keep workers.

TIME TO GET ON THE CLOUD


By using the cloud, construction companies have been able to completely overhaul the way they interact with each other and with their workers. In a nutshell, the cloud consists of multiple networks of servers that allow apps to be accessed anywhere through the internet instead of confined to a particular computer or network.

Contractors that have projects and crews in multiple locations especially appreciate the benefits of the cloud, since it is efficient and allows for the seamless transfer of information.

What’s more, the cloud allows construction companies to utilize software-as-a-service solutions that are updated automatically as opposed to using traditional products that need to be manually installed and periodically replaced with newer versions.

SMALL CONTRACTORS BENEFIT TOO

Small contractors tend to be under the assumption that using the cloud is either too complicated, too expensive or intended for large construction firms. However, smaller firms may actually benefit most from using the cloud. In fact, the cloud has helped small contractors develop smarter work practices that have allowed them to become more profitable.

The smarter work practices made possible by the cloud can eliminate time- and money-wasting redundancies traditionally caused by the disorganized flow of paperwork and emails.

The overall lower cost of using the cloud also puts small contractors in a better position to compete with their larger competitors for projects.


Safety Focus Newsletter - June 2018 Edition

Your Role During Safety Meetings


One of the most effective ways to promote a healthy working environment is to get involved in company safety meetings. These informal, brief meetings allow you the opportunity to stay up to date on potential workplace hazards and safe workplace practices, such as machinery use, tool handling and equipment use.

When it comes to workplace safety meetings, you should keep the following in mind:

  • Attending safety meetings is mandatory. Be aware of what days your employer holds meetings, and plan accordingly.
  • Actively participating is important. Some of the best safety ideas come from workers, often because they know what and where the dangers are.If you have something to add during safety meetings, don’t hesitate to speak up.
  • If you have an idea for a safety topic, chances are others will find it of interest as well. Feel empowered to share safety concerns and improvements with your supervisor.

Above all, it’s important to take safety training seriously. Together with the help of your peers, employers can use safety meetings, training and hazard identification practices to ensure workplace health and safety.

4 Ways Employees Can Supplement Wellness Programs


Workplace wellness refers to the education and activities that a worksite may do to promote healthy lifestyles for employees and their families. Workplace wellness programs can increase productivity, decrease absenteeism and raise employee morale.

Because employees like you spend many of their waking hours at work, the workplace is an ideal setting to address health and wellness issues. While it is an employer’s job to implement general wellness policies, there are a number of things employees can do to supplement health initiatives.

Specifically, to improve physical and mental health and to enhance their employer’s wellness programs, you should do the following:

  1. Eat sensibly.It’s easy to snack at work, particularly if your office is equipped with vending machines. When it comes to healthy eating, moderation is key. Eat a healthy,filling breakfast and substitute greasy food with salads.
  2. Drink plenty of water.Dehydration can cause ill effects, such as drowsiness and sluggishness. Aim to drink between six and eight glasses of water every day. Doing so can even reduce hunger.
  3. Stop smoking.Tobacco use increases your risk for heart disease, cancer, stroke and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Abstaining from tobacco is one of the best ways to protect your health and get the most out of wellness programs you participate in.
  4. Manage your stress.Too much stress can lead to insomnia, anxiety, depression, low morale, short temper, headaches and back problems. Finding ways to manage stress will not only improve your physical and mental health, but it can also help you approach wellness initiatives with a positive mindset.

5 BENEFITS OF WORKPLACE WELLNESS PROGRAMS


1. IMPROVED PRODUCTIVITY

2. LOWER HEALTH CARE COSTS

3. A STRONG SENSE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT

4. WEIGHT LOSS

5. LESS STRESS


April 2018 Safety Matters: Elevator Best Practices

Elevator Best Practices

Millions of employees use elevators each day at work. While elevators are considered one of the safest forms of transportation, it is important to follow best practices and safety precautions when using an elevator.

Boarding the Elevator

Take note of the following procedures for entering an elevator:

  • Make sure you are aware of the risks associated with riding the elevator prior to boarding, such as falls and accidents.
  • Allow all passengers to fully exit the elevator before you begin boarding.
  • Watch your step when entering the elevator, as it may not be exactly level to the floor.
  • Steer clear of the doors once you enter the elevator. Keep all clothes, carry-ons and body parts within the car. Never attempt to stop a closing door.
  • Pay attention to the elevator’s capacity limit. Do not attempt to board an elevator that has reached capacity.

Riding the Elevator

Keep in mind the following procedures for riding an elevator:

  • Stand as close to the elevator wall as possible. Be sure to leave as much room as possible for others.
  • Pay close attention to floor indications and transitions to ensure you are able to exit at the right time.
  • Press the “door open” button in the event of the elevator stopping on a floor without opening its doors.
  • Be courteous of other passengers on the elevator. Do not push other riders in front of you when exiting and be sure to move out of the way of passengers when they exit the elevator.

Watch your step as you exit to avoid tripping on uneven ground.

In Case of Emergency

Although rare, elevator accidents and malfunctions do happen. Keep in mind the following procedures in the event of an elevator emergency:

  • Never use an elevator in the event of a fire. Always take the stairs.
  • Remain calm at all times. If you are in a stalled elevator, utilize the alarm button or phone button to contact emergency services.
  • Reassure those who are panicked in the situation. Remind everyone that they are safe inside the elevator.
  • Do not engage in horseplay.
  • Do not try to exit the elevator or pry open the doors. Always wait for trained professionals to arrive.

While elevators are considered one of the safest forms of transportation, it is important to encourage best practices and safety precautions to all employees or building occupants that frequent the elevator.

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RISK INSIGHTS: April 2018

The #MeToo movement.

The #MeToo movement has spread across the globe since gaining traction in Hollywood, and small business owners should see it as a wake-up call for preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Small Businesses Most Vulnerable to Sexual Harassment Claims

In wake of the #MeToo movement, awareness of sexual harassment has increased, but not necessarily at small businesses. Unlike their larger counterparts, small businesses are more vulnerable to sexual harassment claims because they’re less likely to have formal workplace policies in place.

According to the CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey of more than 2,000 small business owners, only half of businesses with 5-49 employees had formal sexual harassment policies in place. That number decreased to 39 percent at businesses with less than five employees. That’s a stark contrast to businesses with 50 or more employees, as 85 percent said they had formal sexual harassment policies in place.

Eleven percent of the businesses surveyed said they issued companywide reminders of their sexual harassment policies and reporting procedures as a result of the #MeToo movement and other high-profile sexual harassment accusations. Nine percent said they’ve reviewed policies regarding diversity and gender equality. Seven percent have required new or additional training, and 4 percent have issued new reporting procedures. However, 61 percent of all businesses surveyed did not take any of the above precautions.

Role of HR

Complicating matters for small businesses is that two-thirds of those surveyed lacked an official human resources professional, meaning that the business owner was responsible for handling any harassment claims.

Only 3 percent said it was the job of human resources personnel to handle harassment issues and 10 percent said they had no specified way to handle harassment at all. Without a designated, unbiased person to speak to about harassment, employees may be afraid to report it for fear of retaliation.

Protect Your Business

A lack of a formal policy and procedures for handling sexual harassment in the workplace doesn’t mean that a business owner is exempt from liability. Although federal law exempts small businesses with less than 15 employees from the requirement to have a sexual harassment policy, it’s in their best interest to establish one.

Other than the fact that state laws may have smaller thresholds for requiring a formal policy, the financial and reputational costs are too high to risk running a business without one.

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Commercial Risk Advisor - April 2018

Insurance carriers, courts and regulatory agencies will begin to examine businesses closely to ensure that they take sexual harassment seriously and take steps to protect their employees and customers.

It’s always been important to protect your business and employees from sexual harassment, but recent high-profile cases show the importance of re-examining this topic at your business. Social movements such as the “Me Too” campaign have drawn attention to sexual harassment in the workplace, resulting in a growing number of misconduct allegations. These allegations can result in a wide variety of claims and lead to serious financial and reputational damage.

Insurance carriers, courts and regulatory agencies will begin to examine businesses closely to ensure that they take sexual harassment seriously and act to protect their employees and customers.

3 Questions to Ask When Addressing Sexual Harassment at Your Business:

How do you encourage employees to report inappropriate conduct?

The best way to address sexual harassment allegations is to respond quickly. Employees should be regularly reminded that there won’t be any retaliation for reporting inappropriate behavior. You should also ensure that there are multiple ways for employees to make anonymous reports to management.

Does your employee harassment training address your workplace’s unique traits?

A standard workplace policy is a good starting point for addressing sexual harassment, but you should also think about how your employees interact with co-workers and customers.

Do your insurance policies include exclusions for sexual harassment?

Many commercial general liability policies exclude claims for sexual harassment. Although employment practices liability insurance can provide you with coverage, you also need to ensure that policy periods offer coverage throughout the statute of limitations in your area.

1 in 8 drivers are uninsured and liable for damage and medical bills, according to a new study.

Even if you don't use commercial vehicles, employees who use their personal vehicles for any kind of business-related task can put you at risk:

25% of all vehicles in the United States are used for business in some way.
The average uninsured motorist claim is almost $20,000
Most personal auto policies don't provide coverage for uninsured or underinsured drivers without an endorsement.

Uninsured drivers cause about 1 out of every 8 accidents.

3 Defensive Driving Tips That Could Save Your Life

Many jobs require employees to drive a company vehicle. While most drivers are cautious and attentive, accidents can occur without warning—even if the operator has years of experience.

When accidents happen, it can be incredibly costly for employers. What’s more, just one accident can cost employees their job or lead to serious, debilitating injuries.

One way to stay safe while you’re on the road for a job is through defensive driving. Being a defensive driver means driving to prevent accidents in spite of the actions of others or the presence of adverse driving conditions.

To avoid accidents through the use of defensive driving, do the following:

  • Remain on the lookout for hazards. Think about what may happen as far ahead of you as possible, and never assume that road hazards will resolve themselves before you reach them.
  • Understand the defense. Review potentially hazardous situations in your mind after you see them. This will allow you to formulate a reaction that will prevent an accident.
  • Act quickly. Once you see a hazard and decide upon a defense, you must act immediately. The sooner you act, the more time you will have to avoid a potentially dangerous situation.

Defensive driving requires the knowledge and strict observance of all traffic rules and regulations applicable to the area you are driving in. It also means that you should be alert for illegal actions and driving errors made by others and be willing to make timely adjustments to your own driving to avoid an accident.

Keeping in mind the above tips will not only keep you safe on the job, but in your personal life as well.

Poor indoor air quality can cause chronic headaches, allergies, fatigue and irritation of the lungs, among other symptoms.

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