Safety Focused Newsletter - October 2018

Avoid Getting Sick at Work

It can be difficult to avoid getting sick at work, particularly if you work in close quarters. While you may not be able to avoid germs altogether, the following tips can help reduce your risk of getting sick:

  • Wash your hands. Germs can cling to many surfaces in the workplace, including elevator buttons, doorknobs and refrigerator doors. To protect yourself from illness, it’s important to wash your hands regularly, especially before you eat or after you cough, sneeze or use the restroom.
  • Keep your distance. Illnesses like the cold or flu can spread even if you aren’t in close contact with someone. In fact, experts say that the flu can spread to another person as far away as 6 feet. If you notice a co-worker is sick, it’s best to keep your distance.
  • Get a flu shot. Yearly flu shots are the single best way to prevent getting sick. Contrary to popular belief, flu vaccines cannot cause the flu, though side effects may occur. Often, these side effects are minor and may include congestion, coughs, headaches, abdominal pain and wheezing.

In addition to the above, it may be a good idea to avoid sharing phones, computers and food with your co-workers during flu season. Together, these strategies should help you stay healthy at work.

Parking Lot Safety Tips

Parking lots are common hazards for drivers and vehicles alike. Slips, falls, auto accidents, theft, harassment and assaults are just some of the risks individuals face while using parking lots.

Even the parking lots and garages at your place of employment can be dangerous. Thankfully, there are simple and effective precautions drivers can take to protect themselves and their vehicles:

  • Park in a well-lit area, preferably one with surveillance cameras and security patrol services.
  • Avoid parking near shrubbery or other areas that could conceal attackers.

  • Park as close to an exit as possible when using garages.
  • Lock your doors when leaving your vehicle.
  • Remain vigilant, and notify security or the authorities if you notice any suspicious behavior.
  • Lock all of your valuable items in your trunk and out of sight. Avoid leaving purses or wallets in your vehicle.
  • Walk confidently when leaving or returning to your vehicle. If you notice a potential threat, proceed to a safe place, like a public building or store.
  • Use the buddy system, and walk to your car with a co-worker.
  • Have your car keys ready when you near your vehicle.

Staying safe can be easy as long as you’re cautious and mindful of your surroundings.

Avoid Slips and Falls in Parking Lots:

Watch Out for Uneven Surfaces, Curbs and Potholes.

Beware of Ice During Colder Months.

Stay in Well-Lit Areas.

Walk, Don't Run.

Illnesses like colds or the flu can spread even if you aren’t in close contact with someone.

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Trucking Risk Advisor - May 2018

ELD Enforcement Contributes to Rising Freight Rates

Electronic logging device (ELD) enforcement has contributed to rapidly growing freight rates, according to a report from transportation information firm DAT Solutions. The firm found that 3 percent of surveyed truckers planned to retire instead of comply with the ELD rule, which was a large factor in a 7 percent drop in year-over-year trucking capacity.

Although the ELD rule came into effect at the end of 2017, the Department of Transportation only began enforcement of the rule on April 1, 2018. ELDs automatically track a driver’s compliance with federal hours-of-service limits, and drivers who don’t use the devices must stop driving until one is installed.

While freight rates in April are generally lower following the end of the first quarter, DAT Solutions’ report found that rates have increased as motor carriers struggle to account for a shortage of skilled drivers.

Call us at 920-921-5921 for more information on trends in the trucking industry.

New Technology May Replace Mirrors With Camera-based Systems

Although sideview mirrors allow drivers to stay aware of surrounding traffic, the large devices offer limited viewing angles and create drag that lowers fuel economy. As a result, some technology companies are advocating for the use of camera-based systems to improve safety and lower operating costs.

Prototype camera systems feature multiple, internally wired cameras that provide drivers with multiple views of adjacent lanes, the blind spot in front of a truck’s hood and the ground on each side of the vehicle. The cameras themselves also include a number of safety features:

  • Redundant systems to reduce the chances of a malfunction
  • Low-light visibility options
  • Heated glass to prevent the buildup of ice and frost
  • Special coatings that resist rain and moisture

Camera systems can improve a heavy-duty truck’s fuel economy by approximately 2.5 percent and lead to over $1,300 in annual fuel savings. The systems can also lead to savings by reducing crashes, as traditional mirrors are limited by large blind spots, glares, night visibility and adverse weather.

The FMCSA is currently accepting public comments on an exemption for the MirrorEye camera system, which has been used in Europe since 2016. For more information, visit the FMCSA’s notice in the Federal Register.


Construction Risk Advisor: September 2018

Industry Overspending $177 Billion Per Year

The average time construction professionals in the U.S. spend on avoidable issues like conflict resolution, rework and looking for project data costs the industry over $177 billion annually, according to a new report.

The participants surveyed for the report said they spend 65 percent of their time on “optimal” activities like communicating with stakeholders and optimizing resources that keep projects on track. They spend the remaining 35 percent of their time on “nonoptimal” tasks like hunting down project information, resolving conflicts and dealing with mistakes that require rework. That amounts to almost two full working days lost per person each week.

Some of the reasons for the nonoptimal costs include poor communication, constrained access to data, incorrect data and the lack of an easy way to share data with stakeholders. Another possible reason is that more than 80 percent of the survey’s respondents said they don’t use mobile devices to collaborate and access project data, despite the fact that mobile devices could help them work more efficiently.

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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States Say Contractors Must Guarantee Wages

Maryland’s General Contractor Liability for Unpaid Wages Act becomes effective on Oct. 1, making private contractors for prime construction projects in the state financially responsible for unpaid wages of subcontractor employees. And unless the reason for nonpayment is related to a legitimate dispute, general contractors could be held responsible for up to three times the amount owed, plus attorney fees.

California and Oregon also enacted similar laws earlier this year. In California, general contractors are now liable for the unpaid wages of any employee who furnishes labor to or through them, plus unpaid benefits and interest.

Oregon’s wage protection law creates liability for the general contractor only if the worker’s subcontractor employer has not yet been paid in full.

Mitigating The Risk

In order to reduce the risk of general contractors having to pay their subcontractors’ employee wages, some industry experts are recommending that subcontractors provide their own payment bonds.

Opponents of the recent laws argue that it could be difficult for subcontractors on rocky financial ground to meet bond underwriting requirements. And since large projects could require several new bonds per job, overall project costs could increase significantly. Plus, if subcontractors don’t pay up, prime contractors will have to pay twice for the same labor.


Agriculture Risk Advisor: September/October 2018

3 Tips For Hiring Farm Labor

With some farmers struggling to find reliable farm labor, it is important to invest some thought in the hiring process. Here are some tips for finding the right help:

  1. Examine your needs. You might have a general idea in your head of what work needs to be done, but it’s best to be specific. Narrow down broad processes into specific jobs so you can determine how much help you truly need.
  2. Think about desired traits. Do you need someone to fill a temporary need, or are you hoping that person can go on to fill a managerial role? You’ll have to determine whether people skills are more important than manual labor or machinery skills, and list those traits in your job description.
  3. Consider hiring for a trial period. If you’re hesitant about a candidate but need immediate help, consider hiring them for a short-term trial period. This saves you from high employee turnover while buying you time to recognize your needs. It allows both you and the worker to communicate any frustrations and expectations after the trial period before considering whether the working relationship is worth investing in long term.

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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Rise Of Robotics In Farming

Producers are increasingly considering using farming robots to replace human workers who either can’t or aren’t interested in picking crops. Agriculture is a prime market for robotics since it is less regulated than other industries.

Robots Needed To Fill Unwanted Jobs

Farming’s labor crunch is a global problem, and industry experts expect things to get worse in the years to come. Produce growers are struggling to man the fields, and higher wages aren’t persuading people to perform the physically demanding tasks.

According to the Department of Labor, the 2017 median pay for an agricultural worker was $11.41 per hour. In California, farm wages can top $20 per hour. But this is still not enough to attract laborers at a sufficient level.

Advances In Farming Technology

Driscoll’s, one of America’s largest produce distributors, has been testing a robot made by Harvest CROO Robotics, a Florida-based startup. The robot is capable of covering 8 acres in a single day and replacing a team of more than 30 human pickers.

Another emerging farming technology is a “no-touch” vineyard developed by researchers at UC Davis, which waters vines and picks fruit while improving yields, quality and costs. It costs about 7 cents in labor per vine to manage the touchless vineyard, compared to $1 per vine in a conventional vineyard.

Although robotics isn’t expected to steal all of the farming labor jobs, experts believe it could still be a disruptive technology, requiring a change in the way traditional growers operate.


Cyber Risks & Liabilities: September/October 2018

In this Issue

Who’s to Blame if a Security Breach Affects Your Organization?

A recent survey found that 70 percent of consumers expect businesses to take responsibility in the event of a data breach. But who within your organization should take the heat?

Acronyms All Businesses Need to Know

As cyber security evolves, it’s easy to become overwhelmed with all the terms and acronyms used. This article lists some of the most common acronyms in cyber security.

Increase in Attacks Against 911 Call Centers Highlight Need for New System

There have been 184 cyber attacks on public safety agencies and local governments since 2016, and 42 of those attacks targeted 911 call centers

Who’s to Blame if a Security Breach Affects Your Organization?

If a security breach affects your organization, your main focus may be to solve the problem as quickly as you can, not point the finger in blame. But your customers want to know why it happened and who was responsible, even if the breach occurred because of their own lax security measures (e.g., sharing passwords or opening suspicious emails). In fact, a recent survey found that 70 percent of consumers expect businesses to take responsibility in the event of a data breach. But who within your organization should take the heat?

The CEO

If an organization doesn’t budget enough for security solutions, the fault will likely be placed on whoever makes the financial decisions, stemming from the CEO. In fact, 29 percent of IT decision-makers who took part in a recent VMware survey thought that the CEO should be held responsible in the event of a large-scale data breach.

The CISO

If a data breach occurs even after your company adequately budgets for cyber security solutions, 21 percent of IT security professionals surveyed would still hold your CISO accountable in the event of a data breach.

IT Personnel

According to a 2014 report, 95 percent of cyber security incidents are due to human error. That’s why personnel who manage IT security on a regular basis are easy targets for blame.

Other Employees

While accountability may start with the CEO and board of directors, everyone in your organization should take responsibility for cyber security. Even if you have the most modern cyber security technology, its return on investment will be nonexistent without full employee participation

Increase in Attacks Against 911 Call Centers Highlight Need for New System

There have been 184 cyber attacks on public safety agencies and local governments since 2016, and 42 of those attacks targeted 911 call centers, according to cyber security firm SecuLore Solutions.

Over half of the attacks involved ransomware, in which hackers used a virus to control the emergency systems and hold them hostage for payment. Most of the remaining attacks were denial-of-service attacks, which involved a flood of fake calls that prevented call centers from addressing valid emergency calls.

Due to the vulnerabilities in the current 911 system and the fact that it doesn’t address the ways people communicate in the modern world—such as through texts—the emergency response industry is encouraging state and local governments to adopt a system called Next Generation 911.

The Next Generation 911 system will have advanced security and be able to seamlessly move incoming calls to other centers when needed. The new system also gives callers the choice of calling from a phone line or sending data through approved telecommunications carriers and internet service providers.

Next Generation 911 is expensive, however, and governments have been slow to adopt it. Plus, its increased connectivity also opens new potential means of attack, according to industry experts. Sophisticated defense systems run by in-house cyber security teams will be vital as the emergency response industry adopts any new technology.

Acronyms All Businesses Need to Know

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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Your Cyber Liability Policy & Handling Data Breaches Like A Pro

In the digital age we live in, it has never been more critical to have a focused, working cyber liability policy. A data breach for a company is a bad dream but having to tell their customers they’ve undergone a data breach is a nightmare. For this month’s CenterStage, Hierl’s wonderful VP of Property & Casualty, Cathleen (Cathy) Christensen, has brought you some helpful, informative advice on securing a reliable cyber liability policy, enabling you to handle data breaches like a pro.

See also: 6 ways HR can help prevent a data breach

About Cathleen

Cathleen Christensen is the current Vice President, Property & Casualty of Hierl Insurance, Inc. Cathy’s expertise lends itself well to helping local businesses with their commercial insurance and risk management needs. She attended Alverno College in Milwaukee, WI before her career in insurance. In her 25 years of experience in the industry, she has worked on the insurance company side as an underwriting manager, as well as on the agency side as an account executive. Cathy has also been an entrepreneur herself, which enables her to understand the demands businesses face today.

So, let’s get into it: how do you choose a successful cyber liability policy and avoid business fatal data breaches?

The 3 Big Issues of a Data Breach & How a Cyber Liability Policy Comes In Handy

When it comes to cyber liability, three issues plague business. First, there are 47 states in the United States that have separate data breach laws that regulate what business owners must do when a data breach has occurred. Companies that stretch across more than one state have the complication of knowing and going by these laws. Second, there is the public relation issue – attempting to share you’ve had a data breach with customers in a way that won’t completely destroy your company. The leak of private, customer information can lead to lawsuits, too, which leads us to what’s next. Finally, there is the price tag:

“In 2016, the average cost for each lost or stolen record containing sensitive and confidential information is a hundred and forty-one dollars. This is down ten percent from the previous year, but still incredibly significant.” -Ponemon Data Breach Study

When all three of these issues become a certain reality for your business, you are past the point of being able to protect yourself. You need third-party cyber liability experts to step in and help you handle the laws, the PR, and the price tag. Cyber liability insurance policies are tailored to meet your company’s specific needs and as part of their data breach coverage can include forensic, legal and public relations support. It is important to remember that in today’s environment, no company is immune to the possibility of being a victim of cyber crime. However, there are some things you can do to lower your risk of a data breach.

  1. Employee Corporate Security Policy Education. Did you know it’s more common for an employee to unintentionally leak information than it is to be hacked? This is why it’s crucial to educate your employees on cyber risks, but also to have a clear, focused Corporate Security Policy in place.
  2. Encrypt ALL Confidential Data. Even the simplest of things should be encrypted. Plus, don’t use the same password on EVERYTHING. Have different passwords or codes for as many things as possible. That way, if someone were to hack you, then they can’t unlock everything. If you’re someone who forgets your passwords easily, have a notebook or binder where your company information resides and keep it under lock and key without expressed permission to use.
  3. Backup, Backup, Backup. Let’s say your company’s entire computer system is shut down by a virus and you lose everything. That’s a frightening scenario, right? So, avoid it by having backups and many of them. A general rule of thumb is having three solid backup methods. Perhaps you have a couple online storages where you keep files and an external hard drive. It doesn’t matter – just make sure you have it backed up!

There are also a couple of relevant, key issues Cathy wanted to update employers on:

  • Ransomware & Social Engineering Fraud. The biggest scams of today are these two cyber crimes. Both work to steal company information by acting as perfectly normal requests, surveys or even Facebook personas. Employees fall into their traps, giving out company information freely, not realizing it was under false pretenses. Never, ever give out company information – even on something that seems like an official document – without consulting your manager or boss, first.
  • Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The FCC provides a tool for small businesses that can create and save a custom cyber security plan for your company, choosing from a menu of expert advice to address your specific business needs and concerns. It can be found at www.fcc.gov/cyberplanner.

See also: Analyze Your Risks with Hierl’s Cyber Security Advisors

Don’t sit back and wait for cyber doomsday. Take your policy into your own hands, set company standards, and consider cyber liability insurance to help protect your business from the cost of a cyber attack.

At Hierl, Property & Casualty coverage is a partnership; not a product. We look at your entire organization, listen to you, assess your risk, develop a complete strategy and deliver a full-service solution. Our team of experts start by looking at your risk and helping you to gain Insight™ into what is in store for tomorrow. If you have any questions or are interested in knowing if Hierl’s cyber liability solutions is a good fit for you, please contact Cathy at 920.921.5921.


The Importance of Business Continuity Planning

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Rarely do we ever get advanced notice that a disaster is prepared to strike. Weather, network failures, epidemics and violence are just a few of the disasters that could have an impact on a company’s reputation. Every incident is unique due to the challenges it presents. However, implementing a business continuity plan (BCP) can help give your organization the best shot at success both during and after a disaster. A current, tested plan in the hands of all personnel responsible can help mitigate the potential impact. The absence of a plan doesn’t just mean your organization will take longer than necessary to recover from a crisis – you could go out of business. In this installment of CenterStage, Cathleen Christensen, our VP of Property and Casualty, discusses what a BCP is, why it matters, keeping one in place, and how Hierl can help you build a strategy that works with it.

What is a Business Continuity Plan?

Business continuity refers to maintaining business functions or resuming them in a timely manner in the event of a crisis. Examples of crises include natural disasters such as weather, fire, or an epidemic outbreak like the flu, but also include events involving company reputation, violence and network breaches. A business continuity plan outlines the procedures and instructions an organization must follow in the face of such disasters. The plan not only identifies the internal and external needs of an organization after a catastrophic loss but lays out the path for recovery. Cathleen explains, “A business continuity plan can be the difference between successfully recovering or going out of business.”

Why Does Business Continuity Planning Matter?

The importance of having a business continuity plan cannot be stressed enough. Truth is, 1 in 5 organizations do not recover following a crisis. Severity vs. probability must be factored into the management of your organization. The purpose of having a business continuity plan is not only to prepare for a disaster both during and after, but to mitigate the potential danger and lessen the odds of attack for your organization. Serving as the ultimate disaster plan, it is vital that preparation information is made common knowledge amongst all levels of the organization - from the highest level down. To ensure a healthy and effective BCP, craft a plan following these seven steps:

1. Initial Response

Disruption in the day-to-day operations should trigger everyone to not only know what is wrong, but what – if anything – to do to resolve it immediately. Planning and exercising this element of the plan will eliminate the rush of, “What do I do,” from employees. Proper communication will allow there to be no holes in the plan.

The initial response should also provide a clear sense of who is in ‘charge’ when disaster strikes. Whether it be at a corporate level, regionally or locally, knowing who is overseeing the process towards recovery is vital to the success of a BCP.

2. Stabilization

Regardless of cause, every disruption needs containment to prevent a bad situation from getting worse. It is important to know what happened to cause the event and the potential impact it may bring if left unchecked. Assess the impact, know how to stop the bleeding and devise short and medium-term goals to appropriately address the situation.

3. Activation

Following an impact assessment, identify what services need to be restored. Additionally, note who is responsible for the plan – what will they do, where will they do it and with whom will they do it?

4. Communication

In the event of a disaster, stakeholders might initiate various actions to stabilize or restore services. Timely communication between various respondents is critical to an effective incident response. Communication during an incident should be geared towards management, employees, customers and others who have a stake in the business. The goal is to keep them updated regarding the current state of restoration activities and collaboration with responders.

5. Planned Response

These are the initial response activities that need to be taken to limit the loss of life and property in the time immediately before, during, and after a crisis. Items that could be included are:

  • What types of incidents or crisis situations activate the plan?
  • Who has authority to activate it?
  • Details regarding the incident response team
  • Evacuation procedures
  • Contact lists

6. Extended Response

Actual recovery may take days, weeks, months or even longer. After the initial response the recovery plan outlines the steps you will need to take to get your business running again after an incident or crisis. It includes a realistic time frame in which you can get your operations back on track to minimize financial losses. Forcing yourself to rely heavily on your initial or planned response will only worsen recovery efforts. Be knowledgeable about your staff and the direction the road to recovery is going.

7. Return to Normal

When disruption ends, questions will still need to be answered. These are not limited to questions such as, Is the return to ‘normal’ a ‘new normal’. Other questions could include, “How will work between ‘normal’ operations and post-catch up tasks be managed? How will my information for insurance purposes be collected?”

Maintaining a Business Continuity Plan

With a plan in place, efforts do not cease. To remain disaster ready, you must remain active in your preventative efforts. As the world around us changes, so should your BCP to remain up to date and effective in all threats. Communicating any changes that may have occurred with initial plan to employees is a must. There is no way for all members of your organization to remain ‘in the know’ if they are kept uninformed. With effective communication of the BCP comes proper training. As critical as communicating clearly is with employees, instructing them in a hands-on potential scenario leaves nobody in the dark on recovery execution when disaster strikes.

How Can Hierl Help Business Continuity Planning?

At Hierl, we offer the necessary tools for creating an effective BCP. By working hand-in-hand with your business/organization, we offer the resources to locate and analyze potential risks and to create a team within your business to properly manage disasters. To get started, speak with Cathleen today at 920-921-5921 or cchristensen@hierl.com.

 

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