CenterStage: Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Distraction is Deadly: April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month

In 2015 alone, 3,477 people have died and another 391,000 have been injured due to distracted driving.

Not only is distracted driving hazardous to your life, but it can negatively impact the drivers’ lives that surround you. Distracted Driving Awareness Month is an effort by the National Safety Council to help recognize and eliminate preventable deaths from distracted driving. In honor of Distracted Driving Awareness Month, this month’s CenterStage features Cathleen Christensen, Vice President of Property & Casualty at Hierl Insurance, who will provide safe driving practices and how companies can ensure their employees are using them.

What is Distracted Driving?

Distracted driving is a public health issue that affects us all. According to the National Safety Council, distracted driving is any activity that diverts attention from driving, including talking or texting, eating and drinking, talking to people in your vehicle, adjusting stereo, entertainment or navigation systems. You cannot drive safely unless your attention is fully focused on the road ahead of you, any activity that you partake in simultaneously provides a distraction and increases the risk of a crash.

Awareness for Awareness

Bringing awareness to distracted driving is essentially bringing awareness to awareness. There are three main types of distraction:

  1. Visual – taking your eyes off the road
  2. Cognitive – taking your mind off driving
  3. Manual – taking your hands off the wheel

These days, it’s so easy to be a distracted driver – from texting, to talking on the phone, or even using a navigation system. The biggest one, texting, is especially dangerous because it involves committing all three types of distraction. Some studies even say texting and driving is worse than driving under the influence. So, how can you keep your employees aware while driving?

“Several studies believe, as well as myself, that employers should prohibit any work policy or practice that requires or encourages
workers to text and drive.”

– Cathleen Christensen, VP of Property & Casualty at Hierl

But how can you really get your employees to commit to your ‘No Distracted Driving’ policy? It’s as easy as providing education and solutions. Sometimes, it’s especially effective to have your employees sign a contract stating if they need to use any form of a hand-held device, they must pull over to the side of the road. Remind your employees to drive with their devices off or on silent to keep the urge under control. Plus, several cellular devices have come out with ways to set phones to driving mode, leaving a custom voicemail to anyone who calls while an employee/employer is driving, letting the caller know they will call the caller back later.

Companies suffer from great financial loss yearly due to distracted driving. By putting these safe driving practices in place, you will save lives AND money. If you’d like to get more help on implementing a safe driving policy within your workplace, please contact Cathleen at 920.921.5921.


Compliance Recap September 2017

Download the full Compliance Recap here.

September was a quiet month in the employee benefits world.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued final Forms 1094/1095, special per diem rates for 2017-18, and
guidance on the tax treatment of leave-based donation programs. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid
Services (CMS) announced a Medicare special enrollment period for individuals impacted by recent
hurricanes. A U.S. District Court remanded a payment rate rule to the IRS, the Department of Health and
Human Services (HHS), and the Department of Labor (DOL) for further explanation of their rule.

UBA Updates

UBA released one new advisor in September: IRS Releases Draft Forms and Instructions for
2017 ACA Reporting.

IRS Issues Forms 1094/1095
The IRS issued Forms 1094-B, 1095-B, 1094-C, and 1095-C for the 2017 tax year. Coverage providers
use Forms 1094-B and 1095-B to report health plan enrollment. Applicable large employers use Forms
1094-C and 1095-C to report information related to their employer shared responsibility provisions under
the ACA.

IRS Issues 2017-18 Special Per Diem Rates
The IRS issued Notice 2017-54 to provide special per diem rates for taxpayers to use in substantiating
the amount of ordinary and necessary business expenses incurred while traveling away from home on or
after October 1, 2017.

IRS Provides Guidance on Tax Treatment of Leave-Based Donation Programs
Some employers adopted or will adopt leave-based donation programs to provide charitable relief for
victims of Hurricane and Tropical Storm Irma. These leave-based donation programs allow employees to
forgo vacation, sick, or personal leave in exchange for cash payments that the employer will make to
charitable organizations described under Internal Revenue Code Section 170(c).

The IRS’ Notice 2017-52 states that the employer’s cash payments will not constitute gross income or
wages of the employees if paid before January 1, 2019, to the Section 170(c) charitable organizations for
the relief of victims of Hurricane or Tropical Storm Irma. Employers do not need to include these
payments in Box 1, 3, or 5 of an employee’s Form W-2.

CMS Announces Special Enrollment Period for Hurricane Victims

CMS established a Medicare special enrollment period for individuals affected by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma,
and Maria. The special enrollment period will allow individuals to enroll, dis-enroll, or switch Medicare health
or prescription drug plans from the start of the incident period through the end of 2017.

Court Remands Regulations to HHS, DOL, and IRS

The United States District Court for the District of Columbia held that the Departments of Health and
Human Services, Labor, and the Treasury (the Departments) acted arbitrarily and capriciously by failing to
seriously respond to comments and proposed alternatives as part of the notice and comment process for
the Departments’ rule on how much plans are required to pay out-of-network physicians for emergency
health care services.

Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), group health plans cannot impose a higher
copayment or coinsurance rates for participants who receive emergency medical treatment from an out-of-network
provider.

Pursuant to that ACA provision, the Departments issued an interim final rule to establish that “a plan or
issuer satisfies the copayment and coinsurance limitations in the statute if it provides benefits for out-of-network
emergency services in an amount equal to the greatest of three possible amounts—

(1) The amount negotiated with in-network providers for the emergency service furnished;
(2) The amount for the emergency service calculated using the same method the plan generally uses
to determine payments for out-of-network services (such as the usual, customary, and
reasonable charges) but substituting the in-network cost-sharing provisions for the out-of-network
cost-sharing provisions; or
(3) The amount that would be paid under Medicare for the emergency service.”

Despite extensive public comment, the Departments issued the final rule without substantive revision. A
college of emergency physicians was dissatisfied with the Departments’ response to public comments
and filed suit against the Departments.

Although the court determined that the Departments failed to seriously respond to public comments, the
court declined to vacate the rule. The court remanded the case to the Departments for further explanation
of their rule.

Question of the Month

Q. How does the new child age rating structure affect employers in the small group market who are in
states that adopt the new age band?

A. The new child age rating bands will likely result in an increase in 2018 premiums.

As background, in December 2016, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a final
rule that creates multiple child age bands rather than a single age band for individuals age 0 through 20,
for plan or policy years beginning on or after January 1, 2018.

Per HHS, establishing single-year age bands starting at age 15 will result in small annual increases in
premiums attributable to age for children age 15 to 20, which will help mitigate large premium increases
attributable to age due to the transition from child to adult age rating at age 21.

States are not required to adopt these new age rating bands. However, for employers in states that adopt
these new age rating bands, employers will see an increase in 2018 premiums at renewal if they have
employees or dependents who fall within the 14-20 age range.

Download the full Compliance Recap here.


Whitepapers: Making Wellness Programs Work, from United Benefit Advisors

Great article from our partner, United Benefit Advisors (UBA) by Bill Olson

UBA Announces New Resources for Employers Covering the Latest Trends and Legal Requirements for Wellness Programs

Two-thirds of employers believe that good benefits increase employee productivity, according to the 2016 United Benefit Advisors Benefits Opinion Survey of employers. Given the ever increasing cost of health care, UBA finds that one of the best long-term cost-containment strategies available to employers today is an effective wellness program that strives to keep low-risk individuals from becoming high-risk, and helps high-risk individuals reduce their need for medical services.

UBA finds that wellness programs have evolved substantially since they first appeared on the market, and today announces a new Whitepaper: Wellness Programs — Good for You & Good for Your Organization, to educate employers about the latest trends in wellness program success.

“Wellness programs were initially tacked on to an employee’s benefits and consisted of just the basics — physical activity, nutrition, and smoking cessation,” says Travis Horne, MBA, and Director of Health & Well-Being at Massachusetts-based UBA Partner Firm, Borislow Insurance.

“But there’s been a shift: the new thought is that it’s more important to target the solution for a client, rather than just putting something fun in place,” says Horne. “Employers are taking the holistic view of the employee so that there is meaningful change. Basically, there are five different elements — physical, financial, workplace, community, and mind/spirit. Some employers may only focus on three, but the majority focus on all five elements in order to create a culture of health & wellbeing, change unhealthy behaviors and develop a sustainable wellness program.”

According to UBA, some of the latest wellness program trends, include:

  • Comprehensive health evaluations and physician verification forms to identify (and provide early interventions to) chronic conditions before they become catastrophic
  • On-site health clinics
  • Wellness committees made up of both healthy and unhealthy employees

In UBA’s new Whitepaper: Wellness Programs — Good for You & Good for Your Organization, readers will learn which aspects of wellness programs are finding the most success and the most critical five steps to making any wellness program work.

Download UBA’s Whitepaper: Wellness Programs — Good for You & Good for Your Organization, athttp://bit.ly/wellness-whitepaper.

Compliance Advisor: Understanding Wellness Programs and their Legal Requirements

One of the main reasons employers are slow to adopt wellness programs is a lack of time and resources, startup costs, and not knowing the legal requirements, finds UBA.

The new Affordable Care Act (ACA) Compliance Advisor paper from UBA, “Understanding Wellness Programs and Their Legal Requirements,” reviews the five most critical questions that wellness program sponsors should ask and work through to determine the obligations of their wellness program under the ACA, HIPAA, ADA, GINA, and ERISA, as well as considerations for wellness programs that involve tobacco use in any way. With over 20 pages of comprehensive guidance, examples and frequently asked questions, this is an invaluable employer resource.

Download the UBA Compliance Advisor, Understanding Wellness Programs and their Legal Requirements at http://bit.ly/wellness-requirements (free registration required).

“Employers are starting to recognize that promoting healthy behavior internally is also a way to educate and change behavior at home and in families,” says Les McPhearson, CEO of UBA. “When it comes to reducing health care premium costs, wellness is one area that employers cannot afford to ignore.”

See the original article Here.

Source:

Olson, B. (2016 September 8). Whitepapers: making wellness programs work, from united benefit advisors. [Web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://blog.ubabenefits.com/news/whitepapers-making-wellness-programs-work-from-united-benefit-advisors


Counting Employees Doesn't Always Add Up

Original post benefitspro.com

Employee counts are used to determine what laws, rules, fees and penalties apply to a health plan and/or the employer sponsor. But the methods for counting employees are as varied as the laws that affect them. This creates confusion and frustration among employers and can significantly hinder their compliance efforts. To make sense out of all this, we have put together a synopsis of 12 counting methods that employers must utilize to properly administer their health plans. Read on to find out how to stay compliant as you move forward.

Employers with at least 15 employees

Law or compliance requirement applied:
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, as amended by the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA): Employers may not consider a person’s race, color, sex (including sexual orientation), national origin, religion, or pregnancy in determining eligibility for, amount of, or charges for employee benefits. Denying coverage for a condition or treatment that disproportionately affects members of a protected group is also considered a violation of Title VII.

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): An employer may not deny an individual with a disability equal access to insurance, or require such an individual to have terms and conditions of insurance different than those of employees without disabilities. The ADA also applies to wellness and disease management programs.

Who to count: Employees working 20 or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year.

How to count: Count each full-time and part-time employee as one.

Consequences of noncompliance: The EEOC may bring an action in court, and individuals may file private lawsuits to correct violations and obtain appropriate legal or equitable relief (including attorney’s fees and other costs).

Employers with at least 20 employees

Law or compliance requriement applied:
Genetic Information Nondisclosure Act (GINA): Group health plans may not discriminate against individuals based on genetic information and may not use this information in underwriting or determining premiums or contributions. It also restricts questions that can be asked on a Health Risk Assessment (HRA) if an incentive is offered for its completion.

Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA): Benefits provided to older workers (40 years and older) must be the same as those provided to younger workers in all respects, including payment options, types of benefits and amount of benefits (although certain exceptions may apply).

Who to count: Employees working 20 or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year.

How to count: Count each full-time and part-time employee as one.

Consequences of noncompliance: The DOL may assess special penalties and the EEOC may bring an action in court against a plan sponsor for violations. Individuals may file private lawsuits to correct violations and obtain appropriate legal or equitable relief (including attorney’s fees and other costs).

Employers with at least 20 employees

Law or compliance requriement applied:
COBRA: COBRA provides certain former employees, retirees, spouses, former spouses, and dependent children the right to temporary continuation of health coverage at group rates.

Who to count: Employees (in all commonly-owned businesses) on more than 50 percent of the typical business days in the previous calendar year.

How to count: Count each full-time employee as one. Each part-time employee counts as a fraction, with the numerator equal to the number of hours worked by that employee and the denominator equal to the number of hours that must be worked on a typical business day in order to be considered full-time.

Consequences of noncompliance: COBRA compliance failures can result in excise taxes and statutory penalties. Qualified beneficiaries may also file private lawsuits to correct violations and obtain appropriate legal or equitable relief (including attorney’s fees and other costs).

Employers with 20 or more employees

Law or compliance requriement applied:
Medicare Secondary Payer (MSP) rules based on age: A group health plan is the primary payer and Medicare is the secondary payer for individuals age 65 or over if their group health coverage is by virtue of the individual’s (or his/her spouse’s) current employment status.

Who to count: Employees on each working day in at least 20 weeks in either the current or the preceding calendar year. The 20-employee test must be run at the time the individual receives the services for which Medicare benefits are claimed.

How to count: Count each full-time and part-time employee as one.

Consequences of noncompliance: Medicare can collect any incorrect claim payments directly from the employer, regardless of whether the employer’s plan is fully insured or self-insured.

Employers with at least 50 employees

Law or compliance requriement applied:
Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA): FMLA requires employers that sponsor group health plans to provide group health plan benefits to employees on an FMLA leave. Please note that public agencies and public and private schools are covered regardless of the number of employees.

Who to count: Employees working 20 or more weeks in the current or preceding calendar year within a 75 mile radius of the applicable work location.

How to count: Count each full-time and part-time employee as one.

Consequences of noncompliance: The EEOC may bring an action in court and individuals may file private lawsuits to correct violations and obtain appropriate legal or equitable relief (including attorney’s fees and other costs).

Applicable Large Employers (ALEs)

Law or compliance requriement applied:
Shared responsibility provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA): ALEs must offer minimum essential coverage that is “affordable” and that provides “minimum value” to their full-time employees, must report to the IRS information about the health care coverage, if any, they offered to full-time employees, and must provide a statement to employees.

Who to count: Full-time employees and full-time equivalent (FTE) employees in each month of the preceding year. Divide this number by 12, and if the result is 50 or greater, the employer is an ALE for the current year.

How to count: Count full-time (30 or more hours per week determined on a monthly basis) and FTE employees as one. Aggregate part-time hours (no more than 120 hours per employee) and divide by 120 to determine FTEs. Special counting rules apply with respect to special situations, such as teachers, seasonal workers, etc.

Consequences of noncompliance: ALEs are subject to a penalty if one or more full-time employees are certified to the employer as having received an applicable premium tax credit or cost-sharing reduction, and either: 1) the employer fails to offer to its full-time employees (and their dependents) minimum essential coverage; or, 2) the employer’s coverage is deemed to be unaffordable or does not provide minimum value (as defined by the ACA). Failure to file a return with the IRS or furnish a statement to employees can result in penalties up to $250 per return/statement, with a maximum penalty of $3 million.

Law or compliance requriement applied:
Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA):Group health plans that provide mental health coverage must provide parity between medical/surgical benefits and mental health/substance use disorder benefits.

Who to count: Employees on business days during the preceding calendar year.

How to count: Count each full-time and part-time employee as one.

Consequences of noncompliance: Individuals and the DOL may use ERISA’s civil enforcement provisions to file lawsuits to enforce the MHPAEA’s requirements. In addition, noncompliance with the MHPAEA can trigger an IRS excise tax.

Employers with 100 or more employees

Law or compliance requirement applied:
Medicare Secondary Payer (MSP) rules based on disability:A group health plan is the primary payer, and Medicare is the secondary payer for individuals under age 65 entitled to Medicare on the basis of a disability, if their group health coverage is by virtue of the individual’s (or his/her spouse’s) current employment status.

Who to count: Employees on at least 50 percent of regular business days during the previous calendar year.

How to count: Count each full-time and part-time employee as one.

Consequences of noncompliance: Medicare can collect any incorrect claim payments directly from the employer, regardless of whether the employer’s plan is fully insured or self-insured.

Welfare plans that cover at least 100 employees

Law or compliance requirement applied:
Form 5500: Employee benefit plans must file the Form 5500 reporting and disclosure document on an annual basis with the Department of Labor (DOL). Please note that the Form 5500 requirement applies to ERISA plans only.

Who to count: Employees enrolled in the plan at the beginning of the plan year.

How to count: Count each full-time and part-time employee as one.

Consequences of noncompliance: The penalty for failing to file a Form 5500 is $1,100 per day, which is cumulative from the filing deadline. Lesser penalties may be assessed for incomplete or otherwise deficient Form 5500s.

Employers that filed 250 or more W-2s 

Law or compliance requirement applied:
Reporting the cost of health benefits on W-2: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires employers to report the total cost of employer-provided health coverage on Form W-2.

What to count: W-2s filed with the IRS in the preceding calendar year.

How to count: W-2s for full-time and part-time employees count as one.

Consequences of noncompliance: Penalties for compliance failures range from $30 to $250 per form.

All self-insured medical plans

Law or compliance requirement applied:
Transitional reinsurance program fee: The ACA requires self-insured group health plans to make contributions to help stabilize premiums for coverage in the individual market during the years 2014 through 2016.

Who to count: Covered lives, which includes both employee and dependent lives.

How to count: The fee is calculated based on the average number of covered lives, which can be determined using one of the following four methods:

  • Actual Count: Add the total number of lives covered for each day of the first nine months of the calendar year and divide that total by the number of days in the first nine months.
  • Snapshot Count: Add the total number of lives covered on any date during the same corresponding month in each of the first three quarters of the calendar year, and divide that total by the number of dates on which a count was made.
  • Snapshot Factor: Use the Snapshot Count method, except the number of lives covered on a given date is calculated by adding the number of participants with self-only coverage to the product of the number of participants with coverage other than self-only coverage and a factor of 2.35. This method can be used to estimate the number of total lives included in coverage that is not self-only coverage.
  • Form 5500 Method: The number of participants as of the beginning and end of the plan year as reported on Form 5500 for the last applicable time period.

Consequences of noncompliance: As with any amount owed to the federal government, an unpaid/underpaid Reinsurance Program Fee will be subject to federal debt collection rules.

All self-insured medical plans

Law or compliance requirement applied:
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) fee:The PCORI fee supports the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund and will be imposed for each policy year ending on or after October 1, 2012 and before October 1, 2019.

Who to count: Covered lives, which includes both employee and dependent lives.

How to count: The fee is calculated based on the average number of covered lives, which can be determined using one of the following three methods:

  • Actual Count Method: Add the total lives covered for each day of the plan year and divide that total by the total number of days in the plan year.
  • Snapshot Method: Add the total number of lives covered on one date during the first, second or third month of each quarter, and divide that total by the number of dates on which a count was made.
  • Form 5500 Method: The number of participants as of the beginning and end of the plan year as reported on Form 5500 for the last applicable time period.

Consequences of noncompliance: As with any amount owed to the federal government, an unpaid/underpaid PCORI Fee will be subject to federal debt collection rules.


Fond du Lac Fire Department Receives ISO Class One Rating

Fond du Lac Fire Department is joining good company as they now have an Insurance Service Office (ISO) Class 1 fire insurance rating. The rare classification has only been awarded to 178 cities out of at least 48,000 cities nationwide. The second city in Wisconsin to be identified as a Class 1, Fond du Lac is the only city in the state to be internationally accredited.

Assistant Fire Chief Steve Beer says the City’s score improved significantly since the last audit for the rating. He says there score improved by 8 points since 2010 and more than 5 points came from doing risk assessments. The fire department did risk assessments for over 2,700 commercial structures in the City. Fire Chief Peter O’Leary says the department will continue to strive for improvements and raise the bar for the department.

The new rating should be a point of interest to the people of Fond du Lac as it can have a positive effect on insurance rates for homes and businesses alike. “It is a huge deal for our city and, this information is used by virtually all insurance companies to determine property insurance rates,” says Cathleen Christensen of Hierl. The change is effective July 1st and as customer’s policies renew, Hierl will work with their underwriters to make sure they recognize this improvement wherever possible, according to Christensen.

COUNTRYWIDE

WIGraphs from isomitigation.com

ISO is a leading source of information about property/casualty insurance risk. They provide statistical, actuarial, underwriting, and claims data; policy language; information about specific locations; fraud-identification tools; consulting services; and information for marketing, loss control, and premium audit.

Through the Public Protection Classification (PPC™) program, ISO evaluates city fire-protection efforts in communities throughout the United States. A community's investment in fire mitigation is a proven and reliable predictor of future fire losses. So insurance companies use PPC information to help establish fair premiums for fire insurance — generally offering lower premiums in communities with better protection. Many communities use the PPC as a benchmark for measuring the effectiveness of their fire-protection services. The PPC program is also a tool that helps communities plan for, budget, and justify improvements.


Trending: Virtual Healthcare Gains Broader Acceptance

Original post benefitsnews.com

The Cadillac tax may have been postponed until 2020 but that doesn’t mean employers have put healthcare cost containment measures on the backburner. In fact, new research shows 90% of employers are planning myriad measures to control rising healthcare costs.

The 2016 Medical Plan Trends and Observations Report, released today by DirectPath and CEB, highlights top trends in employers’ 2016 healthcare strategies. Overwhelmingly, employers are continuing to shift a larger share of healthcare costs to employees, often through high-deductible health plans, according to the report.

The use of telemedicine, meanwhile, continues to grow, with almost two-thirds of organizations offering or planning to offer such a service by 2018 – a 50% increase from the previous year.

“Employees often say that they go to the emergency room because it's hard to get a doctor's appointment. With telemedicine, you've got 24/7 access and you don't necessarily need an appointment,” notes Kim Buckey, vice president of compliance communications at DirectPath. “That's certainly a huge driver of avoiding those visits to the emergency room or even the urgent care clinic because telemedicine is typically less expensive than an urgent care visit, as well.”

Buckey says it “makes sense” for employers to investigate telemedicine – the remote diagnosis and treatment of patients via phone calls, email and/or video chat – because employees are increasingly accepting of virtual access to just about everything.

“How many employees now are just grabbing their phones, iPads, or computers when they need information? That's something that people are comfortable with using and they don't have to leave their house to get quality care,” she says.

Spousal and tobacco surcharges are also expected to grow, according to the CEB data. Twelve percent of employers surveyed already have spousal surcharges in place, while 29% expect to introduce them in the next three years. Twenty-one percent of employers already have tobacco surcharges in place, while 26% expect to implement them in the next three years.

“I think we're going to see more and more of those, particularly as employers focus more on wellness initiatives,” says Buckey, adding that a robust communications plan is needed before implementing tobacco or spousal surcharges.

“People don't understand basic concepts like deductibles, co-pays, co-insurance, let alone how to make a decision about what plan to choose, or frankly, what's the best way of receiving care,” she says. “As more and more of these provisions are added to plans, they have the potential of being even more confusing and off-putting to employees, so having a robust communications plan in place that addresses all of these issues [is important]. ... There certainly will be cases where these surcharges aren't going to apply to a large percentage of the population. You just want to make sure that the folks who are affected, understand how they're affected and why.”


The Dish with Jenny Ziegler

The March edition of The Dish is serving up Hierl's own Jenny Ziegler's favorite foods.

When she’s cooking for friends and family she enjoys making Beef Tips. Jenny calls them Easy No-Peek Beef Tips because they go in the oven covered, and you just set it and forget it. No stirring is involved at all. Serve this dish over noodles or rice to complete your meal. The easiness of the recipe is definitely a plus, but this is really a comfort food that will take you back to Mom's Kitchen.

Recipe: Easy No-Peek Beef Tips

1- 1-oz. package of onion soup mix
2 lb lean stew meat
1- 10 3/4-oz. can cream mushroom soup
1 c ginger ale
Directions
1-Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.
2-In a greased casserole dish, sprinkle onion soup mix over beef.
3-Spoon mushroom soup over meat; add ginger ale. DO NOT STIR.
4-Bake covered at 350 degrees for 2 hours. DON'T PEEK. Serve over noodles or rice

When dining out you can find Jenny at Friar Tuck's in Fon du Lac. Friar Tuck's is known for their sandwiches and there are three locations in Wisconsin. They also have soups, salads and an assortment of fried foods. The best thing about Friar Tuck's is the delicious food is accompanied by  affordable prices.

Friar Tuck's @ Friar Tucks, 570 W. Johnson Street, Fond du Lac, WI, 54935

 


Executive Vice President, Hierl Insurance, Inc., Honored By National Society of CIC for 15-Year Commitment

Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, March 10, 2016 –Scott Smeaton, CRM, CIC, Executive Vice President of Hierl Insurance, Inc. of Fond du Lac, was recently recognized for professional leadership and advanced knowledge by the Society of Certified Insurance Counselors (CIC), a leading national insurance professional organization.

Mr. Scott Smeaton was awarded a certificate marking more than fifteen years of participation as a designated CIC, which requires annual completion of advanced education and training.

Smeaton’s dedication and leadership brings added value to his clients, associates and the industry as a whole. His ongoing allegiance and support of the CIC Program is a testament to the value he places on “real world” education and customer satisfaction.

The Society of CIC is a not-for-profit organization of The National Alliance for Insurance Education & Research, which is respected throughout the insurance industry for the high standards maintained in the hundreds of institutes conducted annually in all 50 states and Puerto Rico. Other programs of The National Alliance include Certified Risk Managers (CRM), Certified Personal Risk Managers (CPRM), James K. Ruble Seminars, the Society of Certified Insurance Service Representatives (CISR), Certified School Risk Managers (CSRM), and the National Alliance Research Academy.

Download the Press Release here.

Contact us to partner with a dedicated expert for your benefits needs. 


Employee Relations: Don't Bring Me Down!

Original post ubabenefits.com

Every workplace has its fair share of slackers and goof-offs, but it’s what an employer does with those employees that solidifies its corporate culture as one of high or low performance.

Employers that ignore low-performing employees risk more than just productivity. In an article titled, “Study: Beware ‘Toxic’ Influence of Low-Performers” on the Society For Human Resource Management’s website, research found that low-performing employees hurt overall morale and increased their co-workers' workload. Furthermore, innovation and motivation are stifled and mediocrity is deemed acceptable.

What may be of most concern is that a mere 60% of survey respondents looked at their co-workers and would rehire them. Their motto should have been: we may hire the best, but we keep the rest.

Successful companies know how to weed out their weakest links, while rewarding and retaining high-performing employees. They know that employees who perform poorly can cause high-performing employees to seek jobs elsewhere. Successful companies are able to identify their best employees, then they establish incentives, opportunities, or other ways of ensuring they stay.

 

So, how do you identify the best, or even the best of the best? It’s not as easy as it may seem. These are the top 10% to 15% of the organization. A company must first determine a set of guidelines that mark an employee as a high performer. Once the guidelines are in place, observation of these employee traits should be done in order to ensure uniformity and that the guidelines were set correctly.

 

Now that a company knows what it expects in its employees, it’s time to announce that to everyone so that they either know they’re doing the right things, or can make a plan for improvement. At the same time, employers should conduct surveys on employee satisfaction. Their focus should be on their top performers and what makes them happy.

 

Plenty of data should be collected regarding the criteria that not only make an employee a top performer at the company, but also what he or she prefers in terms of job satisfaction. Going forward, this data should be matched to potential recruiting candidates for new positions. In addition, surveys that measure the quality of a new hire (i.e., whether the recruiter hired the right candidate) should be completed at predetermined intervals of three, six, nine, or 12 months.

 

In jobs where there is high demand and lots of attrition, correctly recruiting and retaining the best performers could be the key difference in a company’s success.

President, Hierl Insurance, Inc., Honored By National Society of CIC for 25-Year Commitment

Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, March 7, 2016 – Mike Hierl, President of Hierl Insurance, Inc. of Fond du Lac, was recently recognized for professional leadership and advanced knowledge by the Society of Certified Insurance Counselors (CIC), a leading national insurance professional organization.

Mr. Mike Hierl was awarded a certificate marking more than twenty-five years of leadership as a designated CIC, which requires annual completion of advanced education and training.

Mike Hierl’s ongoing allegiance and support of the CIC Program is a testament to the value he places on “real world” education and customer satisfaction. “Your clients, associates and the insurance profession as a whole continue to benefit from such dedication,” cited Dr. William T. Hold, CIC, CPCU, CLU, President of the Society of CIC.

The CIC Program is nationally recognized as the premier continuing education program for insurance professionals, with programs offered in all 50 states and Puerto Rico. Headquartered in Austin, Texas, the Society of CIC is a not-for-profit organization and the founding program of The National Alliance for Insurance Education & Research.

Download the Press Release here.

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