Safety Focused Newsletter - October 2017

Driver Safety After Dark

The approach of autumn brings less daylight, which results in an increase in traffic deaths. Follow these tips to stay safe during your evening commute.

5 Common Reasons for Injuries to New Employees

Almost one-third of workplace injuries involve workers who have been on the job for less than one year. Learn the most common injuries to new employees and how to prevent them.

Driver Safety After Dark

The approach of autumn brings less daylight, which results in an increase in traffic deaths. In fact, since drivers aren’t used to the decreased visibility, traffic deaths are three times more common after the sun goes down than during the daytime—both for drivers and pedestrians.

Studies suggest that it can take several days to adapt after daylight saving time ends. Although the extra hour of sleep is often celebrated, many people still feel fatigued. Whether you drive for your job or commute home from work in the evening, it is important to remember the following safety tips:

  • Test your headlights, and turn them on one hour before sunset and one hour after sunrise so other drivers can see you easily.
  • Do not look directly at oncoming headlights. Look toward the right side of the road, following the white line with your eyes.
  • Increase your following distance by four or five seconds to give yourself more response time.
  • If you have vehicle trouble, pull off the road as far to the right as possible. Set up reflector triangles near your vehicle and up to 300 feet behind it. Turn on your flashers and your dome light, and call for assistance.

5 Common Reasons for Injuries to New Employees

Thirty percent of all work injuries involve employees who have been on the job for less than a year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The following are the most common reasons for injuries to new employees, as well as ways to prevent them.

  1. Unfamiliarity with workplace hazards—Even if you will be doing the same job as you did elsewhere, don’t assume you’re aware of all potential job hazards and hazardous substances in your new environment. If you have questions, ask.
  2. Fear of asking questions—New employees may be too intimidated to ask questions. Remember that there is no such thing as a silly question when it comes to your safety. Also, be sure to use constructive criticism as a learning experience.
  3. Improper use of personal protective equipment (PPE)—Your past employer may have been lax with its PPE requirements. Don’t bring any bad habits to your new role. Feel free to ask for proper PPE training.
  4. Employer’s assumption of expertise—Some employers may be accustomed to dealing with employees who have been on the job for years and fail to realize the need to properly train new hires. Although your resume may be impressive, don’t assume that you’re qualified to do the job without proper training.
  5. Poor safety communication—A common cause of employee injuries is the inability to understand urgent safety messages. Make sure you’re familiar with emergency safety protocols and that you understand not only what to do in an emergency, but also the method your employer will use to communicate the safety message.


IRS Releases Draft Forms and Instructions for 2017 ACA Reporting

Here are the latest updates in ACA Reporting, including the released IRS draft forms and instructions.


Read the original article here.

Source:

Capilla D. (5 October 2017). "IRS Releases Draft Forms and Instructions for 2017 ACA Reporting" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://blog.ubabenefits.com/irs-releases-draft-forms-and-instructions-for-2017-aca-reporting-1

 

Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), individuals are required to have health insurance while applicable large employers (ALEs) are required to offer health benefits to their full-time employees.

Reporting is required by employers with 50 or more full-time (or full-time equivalent) employees, insurers, or sponsors of self-funded health plans, on health coverage that is offered in order for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to verify that:

  • Individuals have the required minimum essential coverage,
  • Individuals who request premium tax credits are entitled to them, and
  • ALEs are meeting their shared responsibility (play or pay) obligations.

2017 Draft Forms and Instructions

Draft instructions for both the 1094-B and 1095-B and the 1094-C and 1095-C were released, as were the draft forms for 1094-B1095-B1094-C, and 1095-C. There are no substantive changes in the forms or instructions between 2016 and 2017, beyond the further removal of now-expired forms of transition relief.

In past years the IRS provided relief to employers who make a good faith effort to comply with the information reporting requirements and determined that they will not be subject to penalties for failure to correctly or completely file. This did not apply to employers that fail to timely file or furnish a statement. For 2017, the IRS has unofficially indicated that the “good faith compliance efforts” relating to reporting requirements will not be extended. Employers should be ready to fully meet the reporting requirements in early 2018 with a high degree of accuracy. There is however relief for de minimis errors on Line 15 of the 1095-C.

The IRS also confirmed there is no code for the Form 1095-C, Line 16 to indicate an individual waived an offer of coverage. The IRS also kept the “plan start month” box as an optional item for 2017 reporting.

Employers must remember to provide all printed forms in landscape, not portrait.

When? Which Employers?

Reporting will be due early in 2018, based on coverage in 2017.

For calendar year 2017, Forms 1094-C, 1095-C, 1094-B, and 1095-B must be filed by February 28, 2018, or April 2, 2018, if filing electronically. Statements to employees must be furnished by January 31, 2018. In late 2016, a filing deadline was provided for forms due in early 2017, however it is unknown if that extension will be provided for forms due in early 2018. Until employers are told otherwise, they should plan on meeting the current deadlines.

All reporting will be for the 2017 calendar year, even for non-calendar year plans. The reporting requirements are in Sections 6055 and 6056 of the ACA.

 

For an at-a-glance chart of all reporting requirements, as well as information on penalties for failure to file, 6055 requirements and instructions for certain boxes/lines on 1095C, request UBA’s ACA Advisor, “IRS Releases Draft Forms and Instructions for 2017 ACA Reporting“.

 

Read the original article here.

Source:

Capilla D. (5 October 2017). "IRS Releases Draft Forms and Instructions for 2017 ACA Reporting" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://blog.ubabenefits.com/irs-releases-draft-forms-and-instructions-for-2017-aca-reporting-1


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Who’s using what in P&C insurance

With the emergence of 21st century technology, there are bountiful risks for the cyber lives of millions. In this article written by PROPERTYCASUALTY360, learn how different companies grow to combat the threat of employer risk.

You can read the original article here.


Guidewire Software, Inc. has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Cyence, a software company that applies data science and risk analytics to enable P&C insurers to grow by underwriting “21st century risks” that have gone underinsured or uninsured. These emerging risks include cyber, reputation, and new forms of business interruption risk. “As traditional actuarial approaches struggle to address the unique characteristics of emerging risks like cyber, Cyence’s next-generation approach will enable insurers to broaden the scope and value of the products their policyholders need,” , Guidewire Software CEO and Co-Founder Marcus Ryu said in a press release.

In other news from Guidewire: MetLife Auto & Home has begun deploying Guidewire’s InsurancePlatform™ in a new cloud environment for customers using its MetLife Auto & Home MyDirect portal. MetLife Auto & Home is the first P&C insurer in the United States to offer a 100-percent digital experience from quoting to claim service. Rollout of the platform is expected to continue over the next several quarters.

Hearsay Systems recently announced a strategic alliance with Microsoft to help financial services firms empower advisors to be both high-tech and high-touch at scale in the digital age. The companies will focus on addressing the specific challenges faced by financial institutions, including the need for compliant advisor-client engagement technology that will enable advisors to better manage client relationships and grow business. The alliance will bring together the data-driven relationship insights from Microsoft Dynamics 365 with the financial industry-specific workflows, data and compliance capabilities from Hearsay, allowing advisors to more effectively acquire, convert and deepen client relationships.

Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty® (AGCS) has teamed up with Silicon Valley-based software company Zeguro, whose mission is to simplify and streamline cyber security and risk management  in small to medium-sized businesses (SMBs). Through its easy-to-use platform, Zeguro will serve as a virtual Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) to those who purchase Allianz’s cyber insurance coverage to further manage their cyber exposure and decrease the overall risk of financial loss following a cyberattack.

Accenture and Duck Creek Technologies recently teamed up to create several new digital and emerging technology solutions for P&C insurers that are designed to improve efficiency and value. The companies have integrated Accenture’s IoT and analytics technologies with Duck Creek’s core platform and launched a blockchain proof-of-concept for medical bill auditing. “These new tools are the product of our focus on providing a new generation of digital solutions to our insurance clients working in collaboration with our joint venture partners,” Cindy DeArmond, managing director and P&C Core Platforms Lead for Accenture in North America, said in a press release.

Louisiana-based Aparicio Walker & Seeling, Inc. (AWS Insurance) is live on TechCanary’s insurance platform replacing its outdated legacy agency management system.  TechCanary’s breadth and depth of insurance functionality built in Salesforce and flexibility to easily customize it further were key to the decision.

Speedpay, Inc., a Western Union company, and Nordis Technologies recently announced an alliance to offer cloud-based customer communications management services to Speedpay clients. This strategic agreement provides current and future Speedpay clients with the opportunity to add Expresso®, an easy-to-use, self-service application to organize, automate and execute print and electronic communications. Nordis also delivers print/mail and email production services, thus enabling a seamless end-to-end communications solution.

 

You can read the original article here.

Source:

PropertyCasualty360 (9 October 2017). "Who’s using what in P&C insurance" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://www.propertycasualty360.com/2017/10/09/whos-using-what-in-pc-insurance-oct-9-2017?t=agency-technology?ref=channel-news


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President Trump Ends ACA Cost Sharing Reductions

On the evening of October 12, 2017, President Trump announced that cost-sharing reductions for low-income Americans in relation to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) would be stopped. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has confirmed that payments will be stopped immediately. It is anticipated at least some state attorney generals will file lawsuits to block the ending of the subsidy payments, with California Attorney General Xavier Becerra stating he is prepared to file a lawsuit to protect the subsidies.

Background

Individuals with household modified adjusted gross incomes (AGI) in excess of 100 percent but not exceeding 400 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) may be eligible for cost-sharing reductions for coverage purchased through health insurance exchanges if they meet a variety of criteria. Cost-sharing reductions are limited to coverage months for which the individual is allowed a premium tax credit. Eligibility for cost-sharing reductions is based on the tax year for which advanced eligibility determinations are made by HHS, rather than the tax year for which premium credits are allowed. In 2015, cost-sharing subsides reduced out-of-pocket (OOP) limits:

· Less than 100 percent but not exceeding 200 percent of FPL: OOP limits reduced by two-thirds
· Greater than 200 percent but not exceeding 300 percent of FPL: OOP limits reduced by one-half
· Greater than 300 percent but not exceeding 400 percent of FPL: OOP limits reduced by one-third

After 2015, the base percentages were shifted based on a percentage of average per capita health insurance premium increases. The cost-sharing reduction is paid directly to the insurer, and is automatically applied when eligible individuals enroll in a silver plan on the Marketplace or Exchange.

The cost-sharing reduction is not the same as the "advance premium tax credit" which is also available to individuals with household modified AGIs of at least 100 percent and not exceeding 400 percent of the FPL.

Impact on Employers

There is no direct impact to employers at this time. However, employers with fully insured health plans might see group health plan rate increases in future years as insurance companies work to make up for the loss of revenue.

 


High-Performing ACA Navigators Mystified By Deep Cuts Less Than Year After Being Touted As ‘Superstars’

What's the latest on the effects of President Trump's executive order on health care? We pulled this article from Kaiser Health News, which includes multiple sources for information. Check them out and stay up-to-date with us!


You can read the original article here.

Source:

Kaiser Family Foundation (10 October 2017). "High-Performing ACA Navigators Mystified By Deep Cuts Less Than Year After Being Touted As ‘Superstars’" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address https://khn.org/morning-breakout/high-performing-aca-navigators-mystified-by-deep-cuts-less-than-year-after-being-touted-as-superstars/

 

“We have yet to receive any explanation of the cut. We have met or exceeded every one of our performance metrics. There was never any feedback that gave us any indication that we were not going to receive the same amount,” says Lisa Hamler-Fugitt, the executive director of the Ohio Association of Foodbanks. The Trump administration slashed funding for theses navigators by more than 40 percent nationally, with some places seeing cuts of nearly 90 percent.

The New York Times: Trump’s Cuts To Health Law Enrollment Efforts Are Hitting Hard
Michigan Consumers for Health Care, a nonprofit group, has enrolled thousands of people in health insurance under the Affordable Care Act and was honored last year as one of the nation’s top performers — a “super navigator” that would serve as a mentor to enrollment counselors in other states. So the group was stunned to learn from the Trump administration that its funds for assisting consumers ahead of the open enrollment period that begins Nov. 1 would be cut by 89 percent, to $129,900, from $1.2 million. (Pear, 10/9)
Meanwhile, in other health law news —
The Hill: Trump Could Make Waves With Health Care Order 
President Trump's planned executive order on ObamaCare is worrying supporters of the law and insurers, who fear it could undermine the stability of ObamaCare. Trump’s order, expected as soon as this week, would allow small businesses or other groups of people to band together to buy health insurance. Some fear that these Association Health Plans (AHPs) would not be subject to the same rules as ObamaCare plans, including those that protect people with pre-existing conditions. (Sullivan, 10/10)
Politico: Republicans Privately Admit Defeat On Obamacare Repeal
For the first time, rank-and-file Republicans are acknowledging Obamacare may never be repealed. After multiple failures to repeal the law, the White House and many GOP lawmakers are publicly promising to try again in early 2018. But privately, both House and Senate Republicans acknowledge they may never be able to deliver on their seven-year vow to scrap the law. (Haberkorn, 10/9)
You can read the original article here.Source:Kaiser Family Foundation (10 October 2017). "High-Performing ACA Navigators Mystified By Deep Cuts Less Than Year After Being Touted As ‘Superstars’" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address https://khn.org/morning-breakout/high-performing-aca-navigators-mystified-by-deep-cuts-less-than-year-after-being-touted-as-superstars/


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Better risk management means balancing old, new skills

What changes are happening within the P&C industry? Read this informative article written by  STEVEN R. CULP  and DUNCAN BARNARD of Property Casualty 360 degrees to find out!

You can read the original article here.


The P&C industry is undergoing fundamental change, with significant consequences for the risk function. New approaches to data, the workforce, partners and customers are changing the way insurers operate.

The stakes are high, and with interest rates low, revenue streams are under threat while new competitors are entering from all sides.

At the same time, insurers are encountering new obstacles — from regulatory uncertainty to reduced demand among millennials.  The Internet of Things, autonomous vehicles and other major shifts present major challenges along with large opportunities.

P&C insurers and insurance professionals can use these AI tools right now to run smarter, faster — and ahead of...

To survive — let alone thrive — insurers need to evolve. The scale of the evolution could be challenging, but many of the changes that are needed should add significant long-term value. For example, the availability of real-time data allows P&C insurers to think about new products and propositions to unlock predictive and opportunistic strategies.

 

Insurers are also rethinking their relationships with all stakeholders, becoming a "partner" to customers, brokers and other intermediaries while establishing deeper ties in adjacent industries such as automotive and home security. An openness to new technologies also demands a broader ecosystem of supply partners, including technology companies, insurtech firms, venture capitalists and digital specialists.

As we have done in alternate years since 2009, Accenture conducted extensive research in 2017 among nearly 500 global risk management executives in the financial services industry, including 190 in insurance.

We wanted, in part, to understand how insurers view the challenges facing the risk management function. We found that P&C insurers are facing the world with a bit more confidence than their life insurance counterparts. For example, only 61 percent of P&C respondents saw balancing the responsibilities for control and compliance with the need for effective customer service as a major impediment to effectiveness, versus 84 percent of insurers. And only 65 percent of P&C respondents reported being hampered by shortages of skills in new and emerging technologies, versus 71 percent of life insurers.

However, while there were some differences from sector to sector, we found that both P&C and life insurers are taking a more progressive approach to risk management when compared to our earlier research. They are investing to develop their risk functions in three key areas

Innovation is everywhere in insurance.

Innovation is everywhere in insurance. (Photo: iStock)

Harnessing digital innovation

Advances in big data and analytics are helping insurers better understand risk, build stronger predictive models and tailor customer relationships to suit personal preferences and risk attitudes.  At the same time, robot brokers are on the rise, new platforms are providing micro-pooling “social insurance” models, and sensors allow insured cargo to report every bump, scrape and drop impact it endures in transit. In parallel, some of the most transformative technologies are being implemented deep in the back offices of the world’s leading insurers.

P&C insurers and insurance professionals can use these AI tools right now to run smarter, faster — and ahead of...

The cloud is a great example. Our 2017 Global Risk Management Study finds that cloud technology is virtually ubiquitous—91 percent of insurers are using it — but just 26 percent are highly proficient in using cloud within their organization, 36 percent are not using it to its full potential, and 29 percent are only just introducing it. Respondents want to improve efficiency in response to cost pressures, and cloud is the top choice in this regard, with 77 percent indicating their risk function uses it to reduce costs.

Balancing old and new skills

New tools and processes change how risk teams interact with the business, alliances, regulators, customers and other external stakeholders, requiring new skills and a better balance of attributes across teams. Beyond quantitative skills, the risk management function needs to be able to deliver value by providing economic insights, generating new ideas and building strong relationships throughout the organization in pursuit of the overall strategic objectives.

To support these goals, some insurers are bringing staff into the risk function from other areas of the business to enhance credibility and facilitate relationships. Others are hiring from diverse disciplines, including economics, the law and engineering. There are few professionals who possess every skill the risk function needs. From general quantitative competencies to technology acumen, industry knowledge, niche risk specialties, communication skills, creativity and management experience, candidates with the whole package are extremely rare.

Integrating across the business

Currently, 54 percent of insurance respondents say there is limited coordination between risk management activities at the local level and the group level. While some aspects of centralization are desirable to enable a more aggregated and consistent picture for analysis and evaluation, the reality is that risk exists everywhere in the business and risk professionals need to be engaged throughout the business — not only at an aggregate level.

Central frameworks and tools help to provide a more standardized and coordinated response to regulation, a consistent set of rules for managing the portfolio of risks and the capability to perform complex and high-value calculations to measure risk exposure, liquidity and solvency. But decentralization is also valuable because local or specialized teams can focus on local regulatory requirements and market-specific topics. Any effective risk management function must be able to exist locally and centrally, being close to the business and connected across the organizational structure to manage the overall portfolio, including strategic and emerging risks.

As the study results indicate, the nature of risk is changing. It is up to P&C firms and their risk management functions to create and continually develop a dedicated emerging-risk working group that can identify and evaluate the nature of emerging risks and their potential impacts. That may be the best way to address the constant and disruptive change confronting the industry.

 

You can read the original article here.

Source:

Culp S., Barnard D. (6 October 2017). "Better risk management means balancing old, new skills" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://www.propertycasualty360.com/2017/10/06/better-risk-management-means-balancing-old-new-ski?t=commercial-business%3Fref%3Dchannel-feature&page=2


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Using data to identify high-intent consumers

Does your company struggle with acquiring high performing leads? Check out this article from Property Casualty 360 degrees written by JAIMIE PICKLES.

You can read the original article here.


For years, insurance companies and agents have acquired third-party internet leads as an efficient way to supplement their own lead generation efforts. But with the shift toward digital engagement and increasing regulatory compliance concerns, acquiring high performing leads has become a much more complicated venture.

According to a recent study by J.D. Power, 74% of auto insurance consumers use insurance brand or aggregators websites for obtaining quotes and information. This is something that holds true across almost all lines of insurance.

Regardless of device, the preferred platform for shopping is now digital.

But while brand websites generate a percentage of insurance leads, more consumers are choosing the choice model that internet lead generators and aggregators offer to research and obtain quotes. This is because more consumers prefer to have access to what they perceive as independent and unbiased sources for information and quotes.

 

Mitigate TCPA compliance risk

Compliance with the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) has become more of a priority for insurance brands and their partners over the past few years. TCPA lawsuits filed by consumers are on the rise — growing by a factor of 1,273 percent since 2010 — and a number of large insurance brands have been part of multimillion-dollar TCPA settlements.

For example, in May 2017, a Florida-based insurer settled a class action TCPA lawsuit for $4.25 million. And that does not include the court costs and legal fees or the cost to counter bad the bad PR and lost brand reputation from the case.

Knowing definitively that a consumer has given consent to be contacted is a must. Ted Todd Insurance is a multi-office agency in Florida which generates leads on its own website and buys online leads from third party lead generators. They assure TCPA compliance by using a SaaS-based solution to track and verify consumer consent.

CEO Charley Todd says, "the technology tracks and assures the existence of the consumer’s consent, delivering a positive first experience for every new customer, and provides persuasive evidence in the event of a consumer complaint or lawsuit."

 

Analyze the right data

With the overabundance of data that insurance brands have, from internal and external sources, it is not always easy to make sense of it all. Even with a sophisticated data science and analytics program, the key is getting access to the right data at the right time, to help optimize your marketing programs.

In the case of customer acquisition, that begins with having access to data that you can  use to help score, prioritize and route higher-performing leads. By knowing the origin and history of your leads, you’ll be able to mitigate TCPA compliance risk and prioritize selection of and engagement with higher-intent consumers.

The majority of the top ten insurance companies in the United States are doing just that — connecting the dots and using sophisticated technology and data — to gain real-time intelligence into the origin, history and intent of the leads they are acquiring. Such solutions enable insurance companies and agents to follow consumers in real time on their buying journeys until the end when consumers purchase a policy, helping insurers observe and access behavioral data which they can use to analyze the intent of the consumer.

When marketers gain the ability to identify and take action on consumer behavioral data, buying low-intent leads is no longer part of the "cost of doing business" in lead management and analysis. Brands that leverage these insights gain efficiencies and can better focus their precious time and budgets on productive leads.

 

Optimize lead acquisition and marketing

In implementing technology solutions, here are five tips to supercharge your lead generation.

  1. Know the age of your leads. If you’re measuring speed-to-lead from the moment you received a lead post, you are missing a key data point. It’s not about when you received the lead, but rather when the consumer actually submitted the inquiry.
  1. Be proactive in avoiding fraudulent leads and those that are not TCPA compliant. Consumers who didn’t fill out the form or who filled it out six months ago have no intent to buy from you. Also, these leads put you at risk for TCPA complaints. Only purchase leads that are TCPA compliant. You don’t want to damage your brand and reputation, or take on the costs if you are sued by a consumer. You need a vendor who can help you identify, in real-time, that your leads are compliant and provide persuasive proof that a consumer gave consent to be contacted.
  1. Don’t get dupedMany marketers assume that a duplicate is the result of recycled data. They think that the same consumer means it is the same inquiry. In fact, it could very likely be the same consumer with a brand new inquiry, which is actually indicative of a high-intent consumer. Know the difference.
  1. Understand if leads are shared vs. exclusive. Know if your leads are being shared with some of your competitors. If they are, you need to determine how many other competitors that lead is being shared with and whether you are the first or last to receive it.
  1. Right price your leads. If you find a vendor who will help you identify low intent leads, you can reallocate that spend and pay more for higher intent leads. This is a key strategy to quickly and notably improve lead conversion.

 

You can read the original article here.

Source:

Pickles J. (9 October 2017). "Using data to identify high-intent consumers" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://www.propertycasualty360.com/2017/10/09/using-data-to-identify-high-intent-consumers?ref=hp-news


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4 Main Impacts of Yesterday's Executive Order

Yesterday, President Trump used his pen to set his sights on healthcare having completed the signing of an executive order after Congress failed to repeal ObamaCare.

Here’s a quick dig into some of what this order means and who might be impacted from yesterday's signing.

A Focus On Small Businesses

The executive order eases rules on small businesses banding together to buy health insurance, through what are known as association health plans, and lifts limits on short-term health insurance plans, according to an administration source. This includes directing the Department of Labor to "modernize" rules to allow small employers to create association health plans, the source said. Small businesses will be able to band together if they are within the same state, in the same "line of business," or are in the same trade association.

Skinny Plans

The executive order expands the availability of short-term insurance policies, which offer limited benefits meant as a bridge for people between jobs or young adults no longer eligible for their parents’ health plans. This extends the limited three-month rule under the Obama administration to now nearly a year.

Pretax Dollars

This executive order also targets widening employers’ ability to use pretax dollars in “health reimbursement arrangements”, such as HSAs and HRAs, to help workers pay for any medical expenses, not just for health policies that meet ACA rules. This is a complete reversal of the original provisions of the Obama policy.

Research and Get Creative

The executive order additionally seeks to lead a federal study on ways to limit consolidation within the insurance and hospital industries, looking for new and creative ways to increase competition and choice in health care to improve quality and lower cost.


Connecting Business with the College Community, the Next Step in HR Education

Written by Mark Fogel on the SHRM blog is this informative article on connecting business with the college community, and how it is a fantastic next step in HR education. How do you feel about this update in HR eduction?

You can read the original article here.


 

Many of you know I am passionate about preparing our next generation of HR practitioners for the workforce of tomorrow. I have been teaching graduate, and occasionally undergraduate HR courses, in the business school at a major university on Long Island for close to a decade. It is hard to integrate my classes with local businesses when the courses are primarily at 6 or 8pm at night. I am sure many if not most graduate HR programs face a similar challenge.

I try to bring practitioners in to speak, host panels and do an online HR simulation in one of my classes. But, the real-life experiences of being integrated into a business is and will always be the best learning experience as far as I am concerned. So short of the occasional internship opportunity, my students and those at the university have faced a void of HR reality that I have looked to fill throughout my tenure.

I have now found a solution that I want to share with the HR community in hopes that you think about partnering with local schools too.

I have partnered with GEICO insurance to do a case competition in my graduate selection and recruiting class on Attraction and Retention of Millennials for GEICO’s Management Development Program. The project involves having 6 teams of students research millennial hiring and retention trends as it relates to Geico’s current and future employment needs.

GEICO’s local talent team is providing support and opening their doors at a major work center to have my students come into their business to interview and observe their employment practices. Their regional facility has expanded hours of operation and this helps in coordinating schedules for on-sites too. The project/competition ends late in the semester with formal presentations and prizes for the best research. They bring in a few senior executives along with the Talent team to listen, question, and discuss the research results, which adds to the overall experience and creates great networking opportunities.

This is an amazing partnership that can be replicated by other businesses on a variety of projects and is a win-win for all. Students get a bird’s eye view of HR challenges and Geico gets great insight and research in return. With minimal to no cost and great ROI, this is a no brainer.

This is not to say that SHRM and other learning systems, courses, and conferences are not great value adds in the learning experience. They obviously are and I continue to do my part in volunteering in the conference space myself, however this is a missing piece of the puzzle for HR education. Especially for early and emerging practitioners or those wishing to enter the field.

What are you waiting for?

You can read the original article here.

Source:

Fogel M. (3 October 2017). "Connecting Business with the College Community, the Next Step in HR Education" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address blog.shrm.org/…/connecting-business-with-the-college-community-the-next-step-in-hr-educatio


Self funded health care – a big business advantage

Check out this article from Business Insurance by one of their staff writers. In this article, Business Insurance dives into the awesome advantages of self-funding for big businesses.

You can read the original article here.


Health insurance benefits are expensive. The rising costs of health care has driven up insurance premiums to levels where many businesses have been forced to reduce these benefits or drop them altogether. There is, however another option that is less regulated, taxed less and typically results in cost savings: self funded health insurance. The problem is, it's not always the best option for all employers, particularly the smaller ones. And there's a number of reasons for this:
What is self funded health care a.k.a. self-insurance?

Self-insurance is a method of providing health care to employees by taking on the financial liabilities of the care instead of paying premiums to an insurance agency to do the same. In other words: when a person covered under a self-funded plan needs medical care, the company is financially responsible for paying the medical bill (minus deductibles). It's an alternative risk transfer strategy that assumes the risk and liability of medical bills for those covered instead of outsourcing it to a third party. It's a surprisingly common practice:

In 2008, 55% of workers with health benefits were covered by a self-insured plan….and 89% of workers in firms of 5,000 or more employees.
Most (but not all) self-insurance plans are administered by a third party, usually a health insurance company, in order to process claims. The bills are simply paid for by the employer. Health insurance companies act as a third party administrators in what are called ASO contracts (Administrative Services Only)

Another common component of self insurance plans is stop-loss insurance. This is a separate insurance plan that the employer can purchase to reduce the overall liability of claims. With this type of insurance, if claims exceed a certain dollar amount, stop-loss kicks in paying the rest. There are two kinds of stop-loss insurance:

Specific – covers the excess costs from larger claims made by individuals in the group
Aggregate – kicks in when total claims by the group exceed a set amount
For example, a company who self-insures their $1000 employees projects $100,000 in medical care claims for the year. If they purchase aggregate stop-loss insurance for claims that exceed 120% of the expected amount or $120,000, the insurance will pick up the bill for the remaining claims. If the company purchases specific stop-loss insurance at 200%, if any single claim exceeds $2,000, the stop-loss pays the remainder.

Typically, self-funded insurance providers will purchase both specific and aggregate stop-loss insurance unless the conditions are such that specific stop-loss provides enough financial protection.
Benefits of self-insurance

There are a number of financial and administrative advantages to using self-funded health insurance plans for employers. According to the Self-Insurance Institute of America (SIIA) these include:

The employer can customize the plan to meet the specific health care needs of its workforce, as opposed to purchasing a 'one-size-fits-all' insurance policy.
The employer maintains control over the health plan reserves, enabling maximization of interest income – income that would be otherwise generated by an insurance carrier through the investment of premium dollars.
The employer does not have to pre-pay for coverage, thereby providing for improved cash flow.
The employer is not subject to conflicting state health insurance regulations/benefit mandates, as self-insured health plans are regulated under federal law (ERISA).
The employer is not subject to state health insurance premium taxes, which are generally 2-3 percent of the premium's dollar value.
The employer is free to contract with the providers or provider network best suited to meet the health care needs of its employees.
There are, however, some drawbacks to self-insurance policies:

Health care can be costly, so heavy claims years can be extremely expensive
Self insurance isn't tax deductible the same way the costs of providing health insurance is.
Financial benefits are long-term, particularly with an investment component.
Small businesses at a disadvantage

Self insurance is much more prevalent for larger companies mostly because it is easier to predict health care costs from a larger group. The more people in the group, the less potentially damaging a single expensive claim will be to the plan overall. That's why less than 10% of companies with less than 50 employees use self-insurance. The graphic to the right [source: businessweek.com] gives a telling breakdown of its prevalence based on company size.

Because risk is more difficult to predict with smaller groups, stop-loss insurance is also more expensive for smaller businesses. The practice of “lasering”, or increasing deductibles for specific higher risk employees can also be much tougher on small firms. As a result, self-insurance tends to be a less cost effective option than it is for larger companies.

Another roadblock for small businesses is a lack of cash-flow that is necessary to finance self-insurance. This doesn't mean, however, that small businesses can't benefit from a self-insurance plan. In fact, an increasing number of small businesses still are. But fully understanding the risks and rewards for doing so can sometimes be difficult.
Regulations

Because the only 3rd party administration of insurance (stop-loss) is between the employer and the insurance company directly, it is not subject to state level regulation the way traditional insurance policies are. Instead, they're regulated by the department of labor under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act – ERISA. Benefit administrators must still comply with federal standards despite the lack of state regulation.

California SB 1431

California is considering a proposed legislation to regulate the sale of stop-loss policies to smaller businesses. On the surface, the regulation looks as though it is an attempt to prevent small businesses from taking on too much risk. But the true intentions of the legislation may be to prevent cherry-picking of generally healthier small businesses (effectively removing them from the health insurance pool). This cherry-picking would theoretically cause traditional insurance premiums to become more expensive.

According to the SIIA, SB 1431 would prohibit the sale of stop-loss policies to employers with fewer than 50 employees that does any of the following:

Contains a specific attachment point that is lower than $95,000;
Contains an aggregate attachment point that is lower than the greater of one of the following:
$19,000 times the total number of covered employees and dependents;
120% of expected claims;
$95,000

This legislation would effectively limit the options of small businesses as it would force them to purchase a more expensive low deductible stop-loss policies. And according to the SIIA, with this legislation, almost no small business under 50 employees would (nor should they) consider self-insurance as an option.

If the legislation is passed in California, it has been suggested that it is only time before other states follow suit and/or enact even stricter regulations on small businesses. The SIIA even has a facebook page dedicated to defeating the bill they say is:

“…unnecessary and will only exasperate the problem that small employers in California face in being able to afford the rising cost of providing quality health benefits to their employees.”

So while self insurance can be a relatively risky option for small businesses, with legislation like this, it could no longer be a realistic option at all… And, in effect: another competitive advantage big businesses will have over their smaller counterparts.

You can read the original article here.

Source:

Staff Writer. (Date Unlisted). "Self funded health care – a big business advantage" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://www.businessinsurance.org/self-funded-health-care-a-big-business-advantage/