One sure-fire way to engage employees in voluntary benefits

Employers are trying to help employees by offering voluntary benefits. Continue reading to learn how to engage employees in voluntary benefits.


Whether your employees are 22 or 62, they need to plan for the unexpected. A sudden injury or illness can dramatically derail their financial well-being and retirement readiness. As the responsibility for healthcare costs shifts to employees, employers are taking steps to help their employees by offering voluntary benefits, like critical illness and accident insurance.

The hitch, however, is that many employees aren’t taking advantage of these benefits.

There are many reasons for this: Employees may not have much appetite for voluntary insurance benefits after choosing medical benefits. They may not understand what’s being offered or how it is relevant to their lives. Further, if they haven’t been close to someone who has dealt with a catastrophic health issue, they may not grasp how destabilizing that is and how voluntary benefits can help at a difficult time.

So how do employers keep employees from hitting the snooze button on voluntary insurance benefits, and wake them up to how these benefits can help with their overall financial wellbeing?

One way is to understand what employees might need given their life stage, family situation or other variables. To help employees sort this out, here are few scenarios of how voluntary benefits could help employees — with fictional people based on a combination of our experiences with customers.

Leaving nothing to chance

Scott tends to be a worrier. His friends joke that he’s a 45-year-old man in a 25-year-old body. He is in the “adulting” stage of life — getting settled in a career, figuring out his personal life, and living on a salary that’s just a few steps up from entry-level. Scott worries about what might happen if he gets sick or injured and can’t meet his portion of his high-deductible plan. He’s also open about the fact that he doesn’t want to move back in with his parents. Unlike most of his friends, he’s also thinking decades ahead and is already contributing to a 401(k).

Scott wants it all — financial protection now and for the future. Based on what he’s seen happen to friends and colleagues close to his age, he chose critical care and accident insurance coverage during benefits enrollment at work. These options will help cover unexpected costs if an unexpected covered event does happen, and the cost won’t take a big chunk out of his paycheck thanks to his employer’s group rate. What’s more, the benefit is tax-free if he ever needs to use it, and can help keep him independent, and out of his parents’ house.

For employers, these kinds of benefits can help mitigate employees’ financial stressors so they can focus on wellness and getting back to work if an unexpected health issue strikes.

Weekend warriors and thrill-seeking hobbies

Catherine is a marketing manager who is married with two children. She is 44 and in the “balancing” stage of life, between “adulting” and “planning.” Her main concern when looking at voluntary insurance benefits was her husband, who likes high-thrill, risky sports. While Catherine tends to shy away from motorcycles and extreme sports, she is a bit of a weekend warrior since it’s hard to find time to exercise during the week. Her kids are also active and perpetually on the go, whether playing sports or just running around with the neighborhood kids.

Once Catherine learned about voluntary benefits, it was a no-brainer to choose accident insurance for her entire family. While she hopes that her family will only have fun — and avoid injury — doing what they all enjoy, she knows they have to be prepared for anything.

Employers can help employees choose the right benefits by encouraging them to think about how they and their families spend their leisure time, including sports, hobbies, adventure travel or any other activities.

Taking account of a family history of cancer

Meet Justin. He’s 55, married, and has a daughter. He is at the “planning” stage of life — following “adulting” and “balancing.” While Justin is healthy, his family history of cancer is a concern when he considers his future. He’s seen family, friends and colleagues struggle with the costs of a serious illness. He also is acutely aware of saving enough for retirement as he has only 10-15 more years in the workplace, during which he can save.

For Justin, his life stage, family history of cancer and concern for his family’s physical and financial well-being led to his purchasing decisions. To help mitigate financial setbacks if he should become ill, Justin purchased critical illness insurance. He also purchased critical illness and accident coverage for his wife and daughter.

From an employer point of view, emphasizing that employees should consider their family and individual medical history — and how an adverse event could impact them and their families — is a compelling way to make voluntary benefits relevant.

Making it real for employees

Many employers want to help their employees choose the right benefits for their specific needs to protect their financial well-being now and for the future. Showing how needs change with age and lifestyle sheds more light on how voluntary insurance can provide benefits for covered events that will help mitigate financial losses and reduce stress.

Digital technology is making it easier than ever to engage employees across channels with easily digestible but important information. Employers can set up “decision tools” that help employees make choices, offer videos that bring different situations to life, develop app-based calculators, and tell stories about how voluntary benefits can help them and their families during an unexpected illness or injury.

Employees have a lot on their minds. The key to making voluntary benefits real is to show employees why they matter and how to choose the right products. What many employees don’t know is that employers are working hard behind the scenes to offer benefits tailored to their workforce. This is an opportunity for employers to personalize the experience and demonstrate to employees that they truly care.

Grubka, R. (27 June 2018) "One sure-fire way to engage employees in voluntary benefits" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from https://www.employeebenefitadviser.com/opinion/engaging-employees-in-voluntary-benefits?tag=00000151-16d0-def7-a1db-97f024870001


6 ways HR can help prevent a data breach

Employees are often an organization's first line of defense against cyberattacks. Continue reading to learn the 6 ways HR can play a critical role in preventing data breaches.


Employees are an organization's first line of defense against and response to cyberattacks—which have become widespread in recent years. HR, in particular, can play a critical role in protecting sensitive information and minimizing employer liability.

Data breaches can lead to enormous liability, said Danielle Vanderzanden, an attorney with Ogletree Deakins in Boston. Some losses are easy to calculate, such as time spent on help desk activities, investigations and legal defense. Other losses are harder to quantify, such as reputational damage to the business. But it's clear that the costs can be staggering: The average total organizational cost of a data breach in the United States is $7.35 million, according to a 2017 study.

Whether a worker intentionally sold customer data, unintentionally left a laptop on a train or carelessly left boxes of medical records unattended in a high-traffic area of a hospital, employers can wind up paying millions of dollars in damages.

So what can HR do to mitigate these costs? In large part, data security is an issue for the technology department, but HR professionals can help ensure that effective programs are in place, Vanderzanden said at the 2018 Society for Human Resource Management Employment Law & Legislative Conference. Specifically, HR can lead the way by:

  1. Knowing who is hired. Protecting personally identifiable information (PII) starts with properly vetting job candidates who will have access to sensitive information: those being considered for HR, payroll and finance positions, to name a few.
  2. Accounting for equipment. During the onboarding process, employers should complete a checklist so that they have a record of all the equipment each employee receives. Then, at the time of separation, the checklist should be consulted to ensure that all equipment is returned and workers don't walk out of the building with sensitive information.
  3. Training employees to spot issues. Workers may not always know how to identify an issue—such as a phishing scam through which a cybercriminal sends an e-mail that looks like it came from someone in the company. An employee may quickly respond to the message and divulge personal information that can be used to access payroll and other information. Employees should be trained on how to identify scams and also should know what to look for in a legitimate company e-mail, such as a standard signature line, a photo of the sender and a company e-mail address.
  4. Encouraging workers to speak up. When a breach or attempted breach occurs, employees who handle PII must feel comfortable stepping up and notifying the appropriate staff. This is essential for resolving the situation, but also because employers must provide certain notices when information is compromised.
  5. Carefully crafting BYOD policies. Bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies may turn into bring-your-own-breach policies in practice, Vanderzanden said. The more mobile the device, the easier it is for an unauthorized person to walk away with the device and any sensitive information that is stored on it. If employers are going to have a BYOD policy, they should have written policies about what will happen if the device is lost or stolen and what will happen upon termination of employment. Among other things, they should also have a procedure for remotely wiping data from the device.
  6. Building a culture of compliance. Representatives from different business functions—such as IT, HR, security and finance—should work together to ensure that data security measures are ingrained in the organization's practices. Moreover, compliance and cooperation must start in the C-suite. HR can play a role in influencing senior management about the importance of having everyone in the organization follow security procedures.

Check State Laws

HR professionals should note that state laws are the primary source of potential identity-theft liability for employers. "State laws in this area are a patchwork collection and are neither uniform nor completely consistent," said Patrick Fowler, an attorney with Snell & Wilmer in Phoenix, in an interview with SHRM Online. California and Massachusetts have been more active than other states in passing data privacy legislation, but virtually all of the states have data breach notification laws at this point, he noted. Employers should make sure they know what is required under relevant state laws.

SOURCE: Nagele-Piazza, L. (14 March 2018) "6 ways HR can help prevent a data breach" (Web Blog Post). Retrieved from https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/employment-law/pages/6-ways-hr-can-help-prevent-a-data-breach.aspx


12 Ways to Save on Health Care

Managing your money is tough, saving for your health care is pretty rough too. These tips and tricks will assist you in managing your medical finances for the future.


We all know paying for health care is a challenge, with or without insurance, amid rising copays, deductibles, and premiums. But there are ways to hold down the costs that can come in handy now, but also as the Affordable Care Act undergoes whatever transformation (or replacement) the Trump administration comes up with.

The Huffington Post reports that, despite the numerous obstacles to cutting costs on health care for individuals —insured or not — there are also numerous ways to do just that, whether it takes due diligence on the patient’s part or having conversations with doctors, hospitals and insurers — even drug companies — about price.

While such tactics may not exactly amount to haggling, negotiating skills can’t hurt, and determination and perseverance are definite assets when it comes to finding the best prices or convincing medical entities to give you a better deal.

Plenty of other sources have good suggestions for slicing medical expenses, whether for prescription drugs, doctor and dentist visits, or hospital care. In fact,

Here’s a look at 12 strategies and suggestions that can end up saving you beaucoup bucks for care and treatment.

12. Check the internet

You would be amazed at how many tips there are online to help you cut the cost of getting — or staying — healthy.

One of the first things you should do is to check out the internet, where you’ll find not just help from the Huffington Post but also from such prominent sources as Kiplinger, Investopedia, Money, CBS and other news stations — and checking them out can have the advantage of providing you with any new suggestions arising out of changes in the law or in the medical field itself. And definitely compare prices on the Internet for procedures and prescriptions before you do anything else.

11. Skip insurance on your prescriptions

Not all the time, and not everywhere, but you could end up getting your prescriptions filled for less money if you don’t go through your medical insurance.

Costco, Walmart, and other retailers with pharmacies often offer cut-to-the-bone prices on generics, some prescription drugs and large orders (say, a 90-day supply of something you take over an extended period). Costco will even provide home delivery, and fill your pets’ prescriptions, too.

Then there are coupons. GoodRx will compare prices for you, provide free coupons you can print out and take to the pharmacy and save, as the website says, up to 80 percent — without charging a membership fee or requiring a sign-up.

10. Talk to your doctor

And ask for samples and coupons. Especially if you’ve never taken a particular drug before, let your doctor know you want to try out a sample lest you have an adverse reaction to the medication and get stuck with 99 percent of your prescription unusable.

Pharmaceutical reps, of course, provide doctors with samples, but they often give them coupons, too, lest you suffer sticker shock in the pharmacy and walk away without filling the prescription. So ask for those too. Doctors can be more proactive about samples than coupons, but remember to ask for both. After all, it’s your money.

9. Talk directly to the drug companies

So you’ve tried to get a brand-name drug cheaper, but coupons don’t help enough and there’s no generic available (or you react badly to it). Don’t stop there; go directly to the source and ask about assistance programs the pharmaceutical company may offer.

Such programs can be need-based, but not always — sometimes it’s a matter of filling out a little paperwork to get a better deal. The Huffington Post points out dialysis drug Renvela can go for several hundred dollars, but drops to $5 a month if the patient completes a simple form.

8. Haggle

Before you go in for a procedure (assuming it’s voluntary), or when the bills start to come in, talk to both the doctors (is there ever only one?) and the hospital and ask for a discount — or a reduction in your bill for paying in cash or for paying the whole amount. Be polite, but stand your ground and negotiate for all you’re worth.

A CBS report cites Consumer Reports as having found that only 31 percent of Americans haggle with doctors over medical bills but that 93 percent of those who did were successful — with more than a third of those saving more than $100. Just make sure you’re talking with the right person in the office — the one who actually has the authority to issue those discounts. And get it in writing.

7. What about an HMO?

If you’re not devoted to your doctor, opting for an HMO can save you money — although it will limit your choices of doctors and hospitals. Still, coverage should be cheaper.

If you’re generally in good health, choosing a plan — HMO or not — that restricts your choices of doctors and hospitals can save you money. And having the flexibility to go see the top specialist in his field won’t necessarily be your top priority unless you have specific health conditions for which you really need specialized care. In that case, you might prefer to hang on to your right of choice, despite the expense.

6. Ask for estimates

Yes, just the way you would from your mechanic or plumber. Ask the doctor/hospital/etc. what the charge is for whatever it is you’re having done, whether it’s a hip replacement or a deviated septum. You will already have checked out the costs for these things on the Internet, of course, so that you have an idea of standard pricing — and if your doctor, etc. comes in substantially higher, look elsewhere.

And while you’re at it, ask whether the doctor uses balance billing. If so, run, do not walk, in the opposite direction and find a doctor who doesn’t. Otherwise, particularly if the doctor’s fees are high, you’ll find yourself paying the balance of his whole bill once the insurance company kicks in its share.

Normally the doctor and insurer reach an agreement that eliminates whatever is left over after you pay your share and the insurer pays its share. But with balance billing, whatever is left over becomes your responsibility — and you’ll be sorry, maybe even bankrupt. By the way, balance billing is actually illegal in some states under some circumstances, so check before you pay.

5. Network, network, network

Always, always ask if the doctor is in network, and if the lab where your blood work goes and the specialist he recommends and the emergency room doctor and surgeon are also in network. Of course you can’t do this if it’s a true emergency, but if you learn after the fact that you were treated by out-of-network doctors at an in-network hospital, see whether your state has any laws against, or limits on, how much those out-of-network practitioners can charge you.

According to a Kaiser Family Foundation study, close to 70 percent of with unaffordable out-of-network medical bills were not aware that the practitioner treating them was not in their plan’s network at the time they received care.

4. Check your bill with a fine-toothed comb

Not only should you check to see whether your bill is accurate, you should also read up on medical terminology so you know whether you’re being billed for medications and procedures you actually received.

Not only do billing offices often mess up — a NerdWallet study found that 49 percent of Medicare medical claims contain medical billing errors, which results in a 26.4 percent overpayment for the care provided, but they can also get a little creative, such as billing for individual parts of a course of treatment that ought to be billed as a single charge. It adds up. And then there are coding errors, which can misclassify one treatment as another and up the charge by thousands of dollars.

3. Get a health care advocate

If you just can’t face fighting insurers or doctors’ offices, or aren’t well enough to fight your own battles, consider calling in a local professional health care advocate. They’ll know what’s correct, be able to spot errors, and can negotiate on your behalf to contest charges or lower bills.

For that matter, if you call them in ahead of time for a planned procedure or course of treatment, they can advise you about care options in your area and maybe forestall a lot of problems.

2. Go for free, not broke

Lots of places offer free flu shots and screenings for things like blood pressure and cholesterol levels — everyplace from drugstores to shopping centers, and maybe even your place of work.

Senior centers do too, but if you can’t find anything locally check out places like Costco and Sam’s Club, which do screenings for $15; that might even be cheaper than your copay at the doctor’s office.

1. Deals can make you smile

Whether you have dental insurance or not, it doesn’t cover much. So go back to #8 (Haggle) to negotiate cash prices with your dentist for major procedures, and take advantage of Living Social or Groupon vouchers to get your routine cleanings and exams with X-rays. The prices, says HuffPost, “range from $19 to $50 and are generally offered by dentists hoping to grow their practices.”

SOURCE:
Satter, M (2 June 2018) "12 ways to save on health care" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from https://www.benefitspro.com/2017/02/07/12-ways-to-save-on-health-care?t=Consumer-Driven&page=6


3 things you should be telling employees about HSAs

HSAs can seem to be complicated but can save your employees an additional 20 percent on average compared to paying out of their pockets. Here are 3 tips for an employer to keep in mind about HSAs.


Everyone wants to spend less on health care, but many employees don’t realize that an HDHP plan with an HSA might be the best deal they can get. Some people get scared off by an HDHP’s big deductible, some are accustomed to FSAs, and some just think an HSA seems too complicated.

But using an HSA to pay for health expenses can save your employees an additional 20 percent on average compared to paying out of their pocket. HSAs give them a way to pay for current and future medical expenses, and every dollar they save in their HSA saves you money on payroll taxes.

Here are three things you should be communicating about your HSAs:

1. FSAs are rubber, HSAs are glue

Many employees familiar with FSAs will expect that all health care accounts follow the “use it or lose it” rule. To them, saving a lot of money on health care will seem like a gamble since with an FSA, it can be better to save too little rather than way too much.

Make sure your employees understand that there’s no “use by” date on their HSA. The money they save will stick with them until they need it — this year, next year, or twenty years from now. Emphasize that the HSA is their account, and they’ll carry it with them even if they change jobs or retire. And speaking of retirement…

2. HSAs are a great way to save for retirement

Employees who understand their HSA may still only think of them as a way to cover their current medical expenses. The sobering reality is that the average couple will have over $240,000 in medical expenses during retirement. An HSA offers a great way to save for those expenses and other retirement costs.

Explain to your employees that HSA savings can be invested like a 401(k) and can grow year-after-year. An HSA actually offers better tax savings than an 401(k) when it’s used to cover medical expenses. Reassure your employees that there’s no downside to saving too much, because once they turn 65, their HSA savings can be spent on non-medical expenses, so they can use that HSA money to buy themselves those senior-discount skydiving lessons. And speaking of treating themselves…

3. You can pay yourself back with an HSA (thanks, self!)

Many employees worry that they’ll get no benefit from an HSA if they run into medical expenses before they’ve saved enough, so they choose an FSA, since their FSA annual contribution would be available immediately.

Let them know that they can use their HSA to “reimburse themselves” for any out-of-pocket money they spend on medical expenses. So if they spend $100 out-of-pocket on an X-ray in January, they can save some pre-tax money in their HSA during February, and write themselves a check for $100. Just remind them the medical expense has to be from afterthey opened the HSA—so setting it up right away is critical.

HSAs can save everybody money; employees just need to know how to make it work. Having a solid understanding of the benefits and flexibility of HSAs can help employees realize how easy it is to lower their taxes, cover their medical expenses, and save for the future.

SOURCE:
Schneider, C (2 July 2018) "3 things your clients should be telling employees about HSAs" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from https://www.benefitspro.com/2018/07/02/3-things-your-clients-should-be-telling-employees/


3 ideas to ease the transition to a high-deductible world

With high-deductible health plans rising to substantial heights, employers may not be thinking about the extreme changes happening ahead. Here are some tips on how to make a painless transition into a high deductible world.


We’re all familiar with the necessary evils of today’s society: paying taxes, going to the dentist and sitting in rush-hour traffic. Now, there’s another one to add to the list — high deductible health plans (HDHPs). They’re on the rise due to increasingly unmanageable health care costs caused by factors such as increased carrier and hospital consolidation, unregulated pharmaceutical prices, and a lack of financial awareness among medical providers.

In response, prudent employers who want to continue providing health benefits but can’t keep up with the costs are turning to HDHPs to share the financial burden with employees and encouraging those employees to become more disciplined shoppers. This is predictably being met with resistance.

But there’s a more urgent matter at hand: until we find a way to flip the health-care system on its head, we’re anticipating a future where networks get narrower and significantly limit options and deductibles rise to catastrophic heights.

Employers may not be thinking ahead for these drastic changes, which is why brokers can be instrumental in helping clients guide their employees toward the necessary mental and financial preparations. Here are a few ideas to get them started.

1. Shift gears to plan beyond the calendar year.

For most, health care is an infrequent experience that’s handled reactively: you get sick, you go to the doctor, your insurance foots the bill. However, now that employees are on the hook for potentially thousands of dollars, it’s crucial that they plan ahead.

To facilitate this shift in mindset, employers should encourage employees to:

  • Utilize a health savings account (HSA):When it comes to HSAs, people tend to fall into one of two schools of thought: “HSAs are a silver bullet” or “HSAs are a terrible excuse by politicians to allow the existence of HDHPs.” Rarely is a situation so black and white, and this one is no exception. HSAs aren’t the best choice for everyone. Certain demographics can’t afford to juggle the high costs of health care (and life) while also contributing funds to an account. However, it’s important to keep in mind that as costs continue to rise, more people will be pushed above the HSA qualification line and having an account may be the only life raft available when drowning in high deductibles — a trend we’re already starting to see.In an ideal world, the HSA wouldn’t exist. Out-of-control health care costs bear the blame for solutions like HDHPs — and the HSA is our consolation prize. The reason I advocate the utilization of these accounts for long-term planning is because they are the only health care benefit we have that encourages people to think beyond 12 months. Unlike the flexible spending account (FSA), the money in an HSA rolls over every year and grows over time, so it lets people save for years down the road (maybe when the pediatrician bills pile up, or you finally have that major surgery) vs. scrambling to spend their funds before the end of the year. Also, if an employer is contributing to an employee’s HSA, it’s leaving money on the table not to sign up for an account.
  • Shop for the best “deals”:Unless someone is a frequent flyer in the health care system, they might brush off shopping for healthcare since it seems like a lot of effort for a single doctor’s visit. However, considering the fact that the cost of an ACL surgery can vary as much as $17,000, those numbers certainly add up over time. (Even more so if a patient fails to find care that’s in network.) Helping employees understand this concept, and pairing it with an easy-to-use transparency solution, can save them tons of money in the long run — especially if the cost savings from each doctor’s visit are deposited into an HSA for future use.

2. Recognize that options are still available.

I’m not going to try to frame high deductibles in a positive light. It’s not the ideal situation for consumers or employers. But sometimes, just knowing there are options in a seemingly bleak situation can provide temporary relief. Here are some tips for employers to share with employees when they’re frustrated about their HDHPs:

  • Ask questions:Employees shouldn’t be afraid to ask questions. Healthcare is known for being convoluted, so it’s likely they’re not alone in any confusion they experience. They should start with health insurance and take time with the HR manager to understand the specifics of their coinsurance, copays, deductibles, and benefits so they’re aware of all their options, such as free preventive services. Another great place for questions is at the doctor’s office. Asking about and negotiating costs (yes, you can do that!) can have huge payoffs — Consumer Reports found that only 31 percent of Americans haggle with doctors over medical bills but that 93 percent of those who did were successful, with more than a third of those saving more than $100.
  • Stay educated:“Education” can be a tired term for brokers and employers. Employees never seem to read the emails and collateral materials that teams painstakingly curate each year. While disheartening, I think the focus on education is a long but ultimately rewarding process. Consider the 401(k). These plans struggled through the recessions in the early 2000s, but through constant behavioral reinforcement (helped largely by policies such as The Pension Protection Act, which made it easier for companies to automatically enroll their employees in 401(k) plans) and continued efforts by employers, 401(K)s bounced back and hold $4.8 trillion in assets today.The same lesson can be applied to your education efforts as well. That is, eventually the education will stick. So help create a new ecosystem for employees to navigate by getting timely information and resources out there about maximizing HDHPs and utilizing HSAs.

3. Stay optimistic because change is coming.

This point is a bit more abstract. Worrying about health care costs is exhausting, and things are likely to get worse before they get better. However, there’s been a lot of news in the health care space that should bring a glimmer of optimism.

For instance, we heard about the partnering of three industry powerhouses to create a new health care company for their employees. It’s been fascinating to see how much chatter this announcement has already generated and will likely keep traditional employer health care vendors on their toes.

While the trend of employers building coalitions to tackle health care costs is nothing new and it’s too early to tell how successful this initiative will be, the bigger point is that this is a strong signal that change is desperately needed. More and more companies — regardless of what industry they’re in — are starting to realize that they’re all in the business of health care. And as we gain power in numbers, I believe we will build the momentum to create some serious change.

It’s tough to win in today’s health care world, and it’s likely going to get even more challenging over the next few years.  But if brokers and employers can provide the right level of guidance, education, and resources, they can help employees better mentally and financially manage their high-deductible futures.

SOURCE:
Vivero, D (2 July 2018) "3 ideas to ease the transition to a high-deductible world" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from https://www.benefitspro.com/2018/02/08/3-ideas-to-ease-the-transition-to-a-high-deductibl/


3 questions advisers should ask about the potential CVS-Aetna deal

In a rapid changing market, stay ahead of the curve by asking these three questions on the potential CVS-Aetna deal to help determine how it will impact the health insurance industry.


The news that CVS has reportedly launched a $66 billion bid to buy Aetna shows that once unimaginable mergers are becoming the norm. But it also raises some important questions for brokers about the future of group benefits, and how to operate in a fast-moving and constantly changing landscape.

Here are three questions to ask when determining how this potential business deal will impact the employer-based health insurance market:

1) Will this move give Aetna a competitive advantage in the group space?

How are other carriers going to feel about having to compete with an insurer that has pharmacy data on the majority of Americans? Anthem may be at the top of the list with worries, as the company just last week announced that it will partner with CVS to launch its own pharmacy benefits manager called IngenioRx.

2) Are healthcare companies too focused on M&A?

A year ago, Aetna was trying to acquire Humana, and Anthem was trying to buy Cigna. Brokers everywhere were concerned about carrier consolidation and what a lack of competition would do to group prices. How have things pivoted to pharmacy so quickly?

The CVS deal may represent gains for both parties. The deal would give Aetna a new avenue for business growth, and CVS would gain some much needed ground against Amazon’s rumored entrance into the drug business.

But what does this emphasis on inorganic, M&A growth say about the healthcare industry? Healthcare consolidation has been a trend for years, but it hasn’t always worked in consumers’ favor, which could leave brokers wary of this deal.

3) Why should employers care?

What impact will this deal have on prescription prices for employers? Prescription drug costs are one of the largest drivers of employer healthcare spend, so the question is critical. Will Aetna and CVS be able to improve efficiencies and lower costs, or monopolize their group markets?

Another point of interest for employers is the possibility of narrowed prescription options. With narrowing provider networks becoming standard, this deal could result in limited consumer options when it comes to prescription drugs.

On the other hand, the deal could spark cost-saving changes in healthcare delivery. It’s not hard to imagine CVS augmenting their MinuteClinic operations with Aetna’s volume.

Employees might find they like having retail access to primary care at a lower price point, with after-hours service, easy-to book appointments, and pharmacy services built right in. This partnership may be the push retail healthcare needs to become a cornerstone of the primary care model.

SOURCE:
Tolbert, B (22 June 2018) "3 questions advisers should ask about the potential CVS-Aetna deal" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from https://www.employeebenefitadviser.com/opinion/3-questions-advisers-should-ask-about-the-potential-cvs-aetna-merger


How faking your feelings at work can be damaging

Putting up a fake smile on Monday morning is sometimes unavoidable. There could be consequences to carrying a heavy emotional labor load to get over the Monday Blues.


Imagine yourself 35,000 feet up, pushing a trolley down a narrow aisle surrounded by restless passengers. A toddler is blocking your path, his parents not immediately visible. A passenger is irritated that he can no longer pay cash for an in-flight meal, another is demanding to be allowed past to use the toilet. And your job is to meet all of their needs with the same show of friendly willingness.

For a cabin crew member, this is when emotional labour kicks in at work.

A term first coined by sociologist Arlie Hochschild, it’s the work we do to regulate our emotions to create “a publicly visible facial and bodily display within the workplace”.

Simply put, it is the effort that goes into expressing something we don’t genuinely feel. It can go both ways – expressing positivity we don’t feel or suppressing our negative emotions.

Unhelpful attitudes such as ‘I’m not good enough’ may lead to thinking patterns in the workplace such as ‘No-one else is working as hard as I seem to be’ or ‘I must do a perfect job’, and can initiate and maintain high levels of workplace anxiety -  Leonard

Hochschild’s initial research focused on the airline industry, but it’s not just in-flight staff keeping up appearances. In fact, experts say emotional labour is a feature of nearly all occupations in which we interact with people, whether we work in a customer-facing role or not. The chances are, wherever you work, you spend a fair portion of your working day doing it.

When research into emotional labour first began, it focused on the service industry with the underlying presumption that the more client or customer interaction you had, the more emotional labour was needed.

However, more recently psychologists have expanded their focus to other professions and found burnout can relate more closely to how employees manage their emotions during interactions, rather than the volume of interactions themselves.

Perhaps this morning you turned to a colleague to convey interest in what they said, or had to work hard not to rise to criticism. It may have been that biting your lip rather than expressing feeling hurt was particularly demanding of your inner resource.

But in some cases maintaining the façade can become too much, and the toll is cumulative. Mira W, who preferred not to give her last name, recently left a job with a top airline based in the Middle East because she felt her mental wellbeing was at stake.

In her last position, the “customer was king”, she says. “I once got called 'whore' because a passenger didn't respond when I asked if he wanted coffee. I’d asked him twice and then moved to the next person. I got a tirade of abuse from the man.”

“When I explained what happened to my senior, I was told I must have said or done something to warrant this response… I was then told I should go and apologise.”

“Sometimes I would have to actively choose my facial expression, for example during severe turbulence or an aborted landing,” she says. “Projecting a calm demeanour is essential to keep others calm. So that aspect didn't worry me. It was more the feeling that I had no voice when treated unfairly or extremely rudely.”

During her time with the airline, she encountered abuse and sexism – and was expected to smile through it. “I was constantly having to hide how I felt.

Over the years and particularly in her last role, handling the stress caused by suppressing her emotions became much harder. Small things seemed huge, she dreaded going to work and her anxiety escalated.

“I felt angry all the time and as if I might lose control and hit someone or just explode and throw something at the next passenger to call me a swear word or touch me. So, I quit,” she says.

She is now seeing a therapist to deal with the emotional fallout. She attributes some of the problems to isolation from family and a brutal travel schedule, but has no doubt that if she hadn’t had to suppress her emotions so much, she might still be in the industry.

Mira is not alone. Across the globe, employees in many professions are expected to embrace a work culture that requires the outward display of particular emotions – these can including ambition, aggression and a hunger for success.

The way we handle emotional labour can be categorised in two ways – surface acting and deep acting

A few years ago, the New York Times wrote a “lengthy piece about the “Amazon Way”,describing very specific and exacting behaviour the retail company required of its employees and the effects, both positive and negative, that this had on some of them. While some appeared to thrive in the environment, others struggled with constant pressure to show the correct corporate face.

“How we cope with high levels of emotional labour likely has its origins in childhood experience, which shapes the attitudes we develop about ourselves, others and the world,” says clinical and occupational psychologist Lucy Leonard.

“Unhelpful attitudes such as ‘I’m not good enough’ may lead to thinking patterns in the workplace such as ‘No-one else is working as hard as I seem to be’ or ‘I must do a perfect job”, and can initiate and maintain high levels of workplace anxiety,” says Leonard.

Workers are often expected to provide good service to people expressing anger or anxiety – and may have to do this while feeling frustrated, worried or offended themselves.

“This continuous regulation of their own emotional expression can result in a reduced sense of self-worth and feeling disconnected from others,” she says.

Hochschild suggests that the way we handle emotional labour can be categorised in two ways – surface acting and deep acting – and that the option we choose can affect the toll it takes on us.

Take the example of a particularly tough phone call. If you are surface acting you respond to the caller by altering your outward expression, saying the appropriate things, listening while keeping your actual feelings entirely intact. With deep acting you make a deliberate effort to change your real feelings to tap in to what the person is saying – you may not agree with the manner of it but appreciate the aim.

Both could be thought of as just being polite but the latter approach – trying to emotionally connect with another person’s point of view – is associated with a lower risk of burnout.

Jennifer George’s role as a liaison nurse with a psychiatric specialism in the Accident & Emergency department at Kings College London Hospital puts her at the sharp end of health care. Every day she must determine patients’ needs – do they genuinely need to be admitted, just want to be looked after for a while or are they seeking access to drugs?

“It’s important to me that I test my own initial assumptions,” she says. “As far as I can, I tap into the story and really listen. It’s my job but it also reduces the stress I take on.”

“Sometimes I’ll have an instinctive sense that the person is trying to deceive, or I can become bored with what they’re saying. But I can’t sit there and dismiss something as fabrication and I don’t want to.”

This process can be upsetting, she says. Sometimes she has to say no “in a very direct way”, and the environment can be noisy and threatening. “I stay as much as I can true to myself and my beliefs. Even though I need to be open to what both fellow professionals and would-be and genuine patient cases say to me, I will not say anything I don’t believe and that I don’t believe to be right. And that helps me,” she says.

When things get tough, she talks to colleagues to unload. “It’s the saying it out loud that allows me to test and validate my own reaction. I can then go back to the person concerned,” she says.

Ruth Hargrove, a former trial lawyer based in California, also faces tricky interactions in her work representing San Diego students pro bono in disciplinary matters. “Pretty much everyone you are dealing with in the system can make you labour emotionally,” she says.

One problem, says Hargrove, is that some lawyers will launch personal attacks based on any perceived weakness – gender, youth – rather than focusing on the actual issues of the case.

“I have dealt with it catastrophically in the past and let it eat at my self-esteem,” she says. “But when I do it right, I realise that I can separate myself out from it and see that [their attack] is evidence of their weakness.”

Rather than refuting specific, personal allegations, she simply sends back a one-line email saying she disagrees. “Not rising to things is huge,” she says. “It’s a disinclination to engage in the emotional battle that someone else wants you to engage in. I keep in sight the real work that needs to be done.”

Those who report regularly having to display emotions at work that conflict with their own feelings are more likely to experience emotional exhaustion

Hargrove also has to deal with the expectations of clients who believe – sometimes unrealistically – that if they have been wronged, justice will prevail. She understands their feelings, even as she has to set them straight.

“I empathise here, as a parent, with their thought that there should be a remedy, even when I know it’s not going to be achievable. It helps me that this feeling is also true to me.”

Remaining true to your feelings appears to be key – numerous studies show those who report regularly having to display emotions at work that conflict with their own feelings are more likely to experience emotional exhaustion.

Of course, everybody needs to be professional at work and handling difficult clients and colleagues is often just part of the job. But what’s clear is that putting yourself in their shoes and trying to understand their position is ultimately of greater benefit to your own well-being than voicing sentiments that, deep down, you don’t believe.

Leonard says there are steps individuals and organisations can take to prevent burnout. Limiting overtime, taking regular breaks and tackling conflict with colleagues through the right channels early on can help, she says, as can staying healthy and having a fulfilling life outside work. A “climate of authenticity” at work can be beneficial.

“Organizations which allow people to take a break from high levels of emotional regulation and acknowledge their true feelings with understanding and non-judgemental colleagues behind the scenes tend to fare better in the face of these demands,” she says.

Such a climate can also foster better empathy, she adds, by allowing workers to maintain emotional separation from those with whom they must interact.

Where it is possible, workers should be truly empathetic, be aware of the impact the interaction is having on them and try to communicate in an authentic way. This, she says, can “protect you from communicating in a disingenuous manner and then feeling exhausted by your efforts and resentful of having to fake it”.

SOURCE:
Levy, K (25 June 2018) "How faking your feelings at work can be damaging" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20180619-why-suppressing-anger-at-work-is-bad


Quality trumps convenience among employees

Convenience, or quality? Take a look into why researchers are saying quality of a doctors visit outshines convenience when scheduling the next appointment.


Faced with the choice between going to a conveniently located doctor’s office or a more qualified physician, group health plan members are four times more likely to embrace the better-perceived medical professional.

“Traditional metrics like patient ratings, prescribing rates and volume of patients seen were not nearly as compelling to respondents as more qualitative, contextualized statements about a doctor’s clinical expertise,” according to Nate Freese, senior director of data strategy at Grand Rounds, a healthcare service provider for employees in need of local and remote specialty care.

The data is based on a study of 1,100 members covered by Grand Rounds, which is headquartered in San Francisco.

While surprising, Freese says that result depends on the information and messaging that’s provided to employees. Just 14% of respondents based their choice on clinical expertise if they saw traditional physician profiles, whereas it was 69% if they saw contextualized profiles. Contextualized profiles offered more information in complete sentences compared to traditional profiles. These profiles also compared data against other doctors and specialists, such as appointment wait times, expertise and patient satisfaction.

Freese is encouraged by these findings, which were recently presented at the National Healthcare Ratings Summit. “Don’t sell employees short in terms of their ability to appreciate quality and willingness to sacrifice convenience,” he says.

Offering more subjective interpretation of hard quality metrics would be helpful, Freese explains, as long as employers and their advisers are careful not to “overstep what can be reasonably inferred based on available data.”

Another caveat to consider is that finding high quality providers may not be inherently more difficult in narrow networks. Rather, he says, the issue is when health plan members “lack the ability to identify them. And so, it’s more about presenting information in the right way.”

Providing compelling quality information can achieve the same results of a narrow network, he notes. But he hastens to add that even narrow networks must be sufficiently broad enough for members to have a reasonable amount of choice. Geography also plays a role. “You could be in the broadest network, but by virtue of where you live, have reduced choice,” he says.

Michael Hough, executive vice president and U.S. founder of Advance Medical, believes the quality metrics that are currently available are insufficient for several reasons. “We’re looking at things like frequency and whether the outcomes are horrible,” he says. “But just because the outcomes weren’t horrible doesn’t mean they were good, either.” Desired outcomes depend on what’s going on with patients and whether their objectives are being achieved.

The context of care is “extremely important,” Hough explains, noting the importance of relationships between the patient and a trained physician based on human interaction, as well as the delivery of services. Also, while he believes the rise of telemedicine and self-service “is good for many parts of our lives,” Hough cautions that it’s not necessarily true for healthcare because meaningful relationships trump convenience.

SOURCE:
Shutan, B (22 June 2018) "Quality trumps convenience among employees" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from https://www.employeebenefitadviser.com/news/quality-trumps-convenience-among-employees?tag=00000151-16d0-def7-a1db-97f0240f0000


Top 10 health conditions costing employers the most

Conditions that impact plan costs can be problematic. Here is a look into the top 10 health conditions hitting the hardest on employers wallets.


As healthcare costs continue to rise, more employers are looking at ways to target those costs. One step they are taking is looking at what health conditions are hitting their pocketbooks the hardest.

“About half of employers use disease management programs to help manage the costs of these very expensive chronic conditions,” says Julie Stich, associate vice president of content at the International Foundation of Employee Benefits Plans. “In addition, about three in five employers use health screenings and health risk assessments to help employees identify and monitor these conditions so that they can be managed more effectively. Early identification helps the employer and the employee.”

What conditions are costly for employers to cover? In IFEPB’s Workplace Wellness Trends 2017 Survey, more than 500 employers were asked to select the top three conditions impacting plan costs. The following 10 topped the list.

10. High-risk pregnancy

Although high-risk pregnancies have seen a dip of 1% since 2015, they still bottom out the list in 2017; 5.6% of employers report these costs are a leading cost concern for health plans.

9. Smoking

Smoking has remained a consistent concern of employers over the last several years; 8.6% of employers report smoking has significant impact on health plans.

8. High cholesterol

While high cholesterol still has a major impact on health costs- 11.6% say it's a top cause of raising healthcare costs- that number is significantly lower from where it was in 2015 (19.3%).

7. Depression/ mental illness

For 13.9% of employers, mental health has a big influence on healthcare costs. This is down from 22.8% in 2015.

6. Hypertension/ high blood pressure

This is the first condition in IFEBP's report to have dropped a ranking in the last two years. In 2015, hypertension/ high blood pressure ranked 5th with 28.9% of employers reporting it is a high cost condition. In 2017, the condition dropped to 6th with 27.6% of employers noting high costs associated with the disease.

5. Heart disease

This year's study found that 28.4% of employers reported high costs associated with heart disease. In 2015, heart disease was the second highest cost driver with 37.1% of employers citing high costs from the disease.

4. Arthritis/back/musculoskeletal

Nearly three in 10 employers (28.9%) say these conditions are drivers of their health plan costs, compared to 34.5% in 2015.

3. Obesity

Obesity is still a top concern for employers, but slightly less so than it was two years ago. In 2017, 29% of employers found obesity to be a burden on health plans. In 2015, 32.45 cited obesity as a major cost driver.

2. Cancer (all kinds)

Cancer has become more expensive for employers. Now, 35.4% of employers report cancer increasing the costs of health plans, compared to 32% in 2015.

1. Diabetes

The king of raising health costs, diabetes has topped the list both in 2015 and 2017. In the most recent report, 44.3% of employers say diabetes is among the conditions impacting plan costs.

SOURCE:
Otto. N (18 June 2018) "Top 10 health conditions costing employers the most" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from https://www.employeebenefitadviser.com/slideshow/top-10-health-conditions-costing-employers-the-most


7 wellness program ideas you may want to steal

Need more energy and excitement in your office? Keep your employees healthy and motivated with these fun wellness program ideas.


Building your own workplace wellness program takes work–and time–but it’s worth it.

“It’s an investment we need to make,” Jennifer Bartlett, HR director at Griffin Communication, told a group of benefits managers during a session at the Human Resource Executive Health and Benefits Leadership Conference. “We want [employees] to be healthy and happy, and if they’re healthy and happy they’ll be more productive.”

Bartlett shared her experiences building, and (continually) tweaking, a wellness program at her company–a multimedia company running TV outlets across Oklahoma –over the last seven years. “If there was a contest or challenge we’ve done it,” she said, noting there have been some failed ventures.

“We got into wellness because we wanted to reduce health costs, but that’s not why we do it today,” she said. “We do it today because employees like it and it increases morale and engagement.”

Though Griffin Communication's wellness program is extensive and covers more than this list, here are some components of it that's working out well that your company might want to steal:

  1. Fitbit challenge. Yes, fit bits can make a difference, Bartlett said. The way she implemented a program was to have a handful of goals and different levels as not everyone is at the same pace-some might walk 20,000 steps in a day, while someone else might strive for 5,000. There are also competition and rewards attached. At Griffin Communications, the company purchased a number of Fitbits, then sold them to its employees for half the cost.
  2. Race entry. Griffin tries to get its employees moving by being supportive of their fitness goals. If an employee wants to participate in a race-whether walking or running a 5k or even a marathon, it will reimburse them up to $50 one time.
  3. Wellness pantry. This idea, Bartlett said, was "more popular than I ever could have imagined." Bartlett stocks up the fridge and pantry in the company's kitchen with healthy food options. Employees then pay whole sale the price of the food, so it's a cheap option for them to instead of hitting the vending machine. "Employees can pay 25 cents for a bottled water or $1.50 for a soda from the machine."
  4. Gym membership. "We don't have an onsite workout facility, but we offer 50 percent reimbursement of (employees') gym membership cost up to a max of 200 per year," she said. The company also reimburses employees for fitness classes, such as yoga.
  5. Biggest Loser contest. Though this contest isn't always popular among companies, a Biggest Loser-type competition- in which employees compete to lose the most weight-worked out well at Griffin. Plus, Bartlett said, "this doesn't cost us anything because the employee buys in $10 to do it." She also insisted the company is sensitive to employees. For example, they only share percentages of weight loss instead of sharing how much each worker weights.
  6. "Project Zero" contest. This is a program pretty much everyone can use: Its aim is to avoid gaining the dreaded holiday wights. The contest runs from early to mid- November through the first of the year. "Participants will weigh in the first and last day of the contest," Bartlett said. "The goal is to not gain weight during the holidays-we're not trying to get people to lose weight but we're just to not get them to not eat that third piece of pie."
  7. Corporate challenges. Nothing both builds camaraderie and encourages fitness like a team sports or company field day. Bartlett said that employees have basically taken this idea and run with it themselves- coming up with fun ideas throughout the year.

SOURCE:
Mayer K (14 June 2018) "7 wellness program ideas you may want to steal" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from https://www.benefitspro.com/2015/10/10/7-wellness-program-ideas-you-may-want-to-steal/