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Using data to identify high-intent consumers

Does your company struggle with acquiring high performing leads? Check out this article from Property Casualty 360 degrees written by JAIMIE PICKLES.

You can read the original article here.


For years, insurance companies and agents have acquired third-party internet leads as an efficient way to supplement their own lead generation efforts. But with the shift toward digital engagement and increasing regulatory compliance concerns, acquiring high performing leads has become a much more complicated venture.

According to a recent study by J.D. Power, 74% of auto insurance consumers use insurance brand or aggregators websites for obtaining quotes and information. This is something that holds true across almost all lines of insurance.

Regardless of device, the preferred platform for shopping is now digital.

But while brand websites generate a percentage of insurance leads, more consumers are choosing the choice model that internet lead generators and aggregators offer to research and obtain quotes. This is because more consumers prefer to have access to what they perceive as independent and unbiased sources for information and quotes.

 

Mitigate TCPA compliance risk

Compliance with the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) has become more of a priority for insurance brands and their partners over the past few years. TCPA lawsuits filed by consumers are on the rise — growing by a factor of 1,273 percent since 2010 — and a number of large insurance brands have been part of multimillion-dollar TCPA settlements.

For example, in May 2017, a Florida-based insurer settled a class action TCPA lawsuit for $4.25 million. And that does not include the court costs and legal fees or the cost to counter bad the bad PR and lost brand reputation from the case.

Knowing definitively that a consumer has given consent to be contacted is a must. Ted Todd Insurance is a multi-office agency in Florida which generates leads on its own website and buys online leads from third party lead generators. They assure TCPA compliance by using a SaaS-based solution to track and verify consumer consent.

CEO Charley Todd says, "the technology tracks and assures the existence of the consumer’s consent, delivering a positive first experience for every new customer, and provides persuasive evidence in the event of a consumer complaint or lawsuit."

 

Analyze the right data

With the overabundance of data that insurance brands have, from internal and external sources, it is not always easy to make sense of it all. Even with a sophisticated data science and analytics program, the key is getting access to the right data at the right time, to help optimize your marketing programs.

In the case of customer acquisition, that begins with having access to data that you can  use to help score, prioritize and route higher-performing leads. By knowing the origin and history of your leads, you’ll be able to mitigate TCPA compliance risk and prioritize selection of and engagement with higher-intent consumers.

The majority of the top ten insurance companies in the United States are doing just that — connecting the dots and using sophisticated technology and data — to gain real-time intelligence into the origin, history and intent of the leads they are acquiring. Such solutions enable insurance companies and agents to follow consumers in real time on their buying journeys until the end when consumers purchase a policy, helping insurers observe and access behavioral data which they can use to analyze the intent of the consumer.

When marketers gain the ability to identify and take action on consumer behavioral data, buying low-intent leads is no longer part of the "cost of doing business" in lead management and analysis. Brands that leverage these insights gain efficiencies and can better focus their precious time and budgets on productive leads.

 

Optimize lead acquisition and marketing

In implementing technology solutions, here are five tips to supercharge your lead generation.

  1. Know the age of your leads. If you’re measuring speed-to-lead from the moment you received a lead post, you are missing a key data point. It’s not about when you received the lead, but rather when the consumer actually submitted the inquiry.
  1. Be proactive in avoiding fraudulent leads and those that are not TCPA compliant. Consumers who didn’t fill out the form or who filled it out six months ago have no intent to buy from you. Also, these leads put you at risk for TCPA complaints. Only purchase leads that are TCPA compliant. You don’t want to damage your brand and reputation, or take on the costs if you are sued by a consumer. You need a vendor who can help you identify, in real-time, that your leads are compliant and provide persuasive proof that a consumer gave consent to be contacted.
  1. Don’t get dupedMany marketers assume that a duplicate is the result of recycled data. They think that the same consumer means it is the same inquiry. In fact, it could very likely be the same consumer with a brand new inquiry, which is actually indicative of a high-intent consumer. Know the difference.
  1. Understand if leads are shared vs. exclusive. Know if your leads are being shared with some of your competitors. If they are, you need to determine how many other competitors that lead is being shared with and whether you are the first or last to receive it.
  1. Right price your leads. If you find a vendor who will help you identify low intent leads, you can reallocate that spend and pay more for higher intent leads. This is a key strategy to quickly and notably improve lead conversion.

 

You can read the original article here.

Source:

Pickles J. (9 October 2017). "Using data to identify high-intent consumers" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://www.propertycasualty360.com/2017/10/09/using-data-to-identify-high-intent-consumers?ref=hp-news


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Apple, Fitbit to join FDA program to speed health tech

Wondering how technology can speed the process of developing health tech? In this article from BenefitsPro written by Anna Edney, gain a close insight on how Apple and Fitbit are working together with the FDA to make your health of vital importance.

You can read the original article here.


A federal agency that regulates apples wants to make regulations on Apple Inc. a little easier.

The Food and Drug Administration, which oversees new drugs, medical devices and much of the U.S. food supply, said Tuesday that it had selected nine major tech companies for a pilot program that may let them avoid some regulations that have tied up developers working on health software and products.

“We need to modernize our regulatory framework so that it matches the kind of innovation we’re being asked to evaluate,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a statement.

The program is meant to let the companies get products pre-cleared rather than going through the agency’s standard application and approval process that can take months. Along with Apple, Fitbit Inc., Samsung Electronics Co., Verily Life Sciences, Johnson & Johnson and Roche Holding AG will participate.

 

A new report and video from the Health Enhancement Research Organization (HERO) identifies six promising practices for effectively integrating wearables...
The FDA program is meant to help the companies more rapidly develop new products while maintaining some government oversight of technology that may be used by patients or their doctors to prevent, diagnose and treat conditions.

Apple is studying whether its watch can detect heart abnormalities. The process it will go through to make sure it’s using sound quality metrics and other measures won’t be as costly and time-consuming as when the government clears a new pacemaker, for example. Verily, the life sciences arm of Google parent Alphabet Inc., is working with Novartis AG to develop a contact lens that could continuously monitor the body’s blood sugar.

Faster Pace

“Historically, health care has been slow to implement disruptive technology tools that have transformed other areas of commerce and daily life,” Gottlieb said in July when he announced that digital health manufacturers could apply for the pilot program.

Officially dubbed the Pre-Cert for Software Pilot, Gottlieb at the time called it “a new and pragmatic approach to digital health technology.”

The other companies included in the pilot are Pear Therapeutics Inc., Phosphorus Inc. and Tidepool.

The program is part of a broader move at the FDA, particularly since Gottlieb took over in May, to streamline regulation and get medical products to patients faster. The commissioner said last week the agency will clarify how drugmakers might use data from treatments already approved in some disease to gain approvals for more conditions. In July, he delayed oversight of electronic cigarettes while the agency decides what information it will need from makers of the products.

Rules Uncertainty

As Silicon Valley developers have pushed into health care, the industry has been at times uncertain about when it needed the FDA’s approval. In 2013, the consumer gene-testing company 23andMe Inc. was ordered by the agency to temporarily stop selling its health analysis product until it was cleared by regulators, for example.

Under the pilot, the FDA will scrutinize digital health companies’ software and will inspect their facilities to ensure they meet quality standards and can adequately track their products once they’re on the market. If they pass the agency’s audits, the companies would be pre-certified and may face a less stringent approval process or not have to go through FDA approval at all.

More than 100 companies were interested in the pilot, according to the FDA. The agency plans to hold a public workshop on the program in January to help developers not in the pilot understand the process and four months of initial findings.

You can read the original article here.

Source:

Edeny A. (27 September 2017). "Apple, Fitbit to join FDA program to speed health tech" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://www.benefitspro.com/2017/09/27/apple-fitbit-to-join-fda-program-to-speed-health-t

Wondering how technology can speed the process of developing health tech? In this article from BenefitsPro written by Anna Edney, gain a close insight on how Apple and Fitbit are working together with the FDA to make your health of vital importance.

You can read the original article here.


A federal agency that regulates apples wants to make regulations on Apple Inc. a little easier.

The Food and Drug Administration, which oversees new drugs, medical devices and much of the U.S. food supply, said Tuesday that it had selected nine major tech companies for a pilot program that may let them avoid some regulations that have tied up developers working on health software and products.

“We need to modernize our regulatory framework so that it matches the kind of innovation we’re being asked to evaluate,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a statement.

The program is meant to let the companies get products pre-cleared rather than going through the agency’s standard application and approval process that can take months. Along with Apple, Fitbit Inc., Samsung Electronics Co., Verily Life Sciences, Johnson & Johnson and Roche Holding AG will participate.

 

A new report and video from the Health Enhancement Research Organization (HERO) identifies six promising practices for effectively integrating wearables...
The FDA program is meant to help the companies more rapidly develop new products while maintaining some government oversight of technology that may be used by patients or their doctors to prevent, diagnose and treat conditions.

Apple is studying whether its watch can detect heart abnormalities. The process it will go through to make sure it’s using sound quality metrics and other measures won’t be as costly and time-consuming as when the government clears a new pacemaker, for example. Verily, the life sciences arm of Google parent Alphabet Inc., is working with Novartis AG to develop a contact lens that could continuously monitor the body’s blood sugar.

Faster Pace

“Historically, health care has been slow to implement disruptive technology tools that have transformed other areas of commerce and daily life,” Gottlieb said in July when he announced that digital health manufacturers could apply for the pilot program.

Officially dubbed the Pre-Cert for Software Pilot, Gottlieb at the time called it “a new and pragmatic approach to digital health technology.”

The other companies included in the pilot are Pear Therapeutics Inc., Phosphorus Inc. and Tidepool.

The program is part of a broader move at the FDA, particularly since Gottlieb took over in May, to streamline regulation and get medical products to patients faster. The commissioner said last week the agency will clarify how drugmakers might use data from treatments already approved in some disease to gain approvals for more conditions. In July, he delayed oversight of electronic cigarettes while the agency decides what information it will need from makers of the products.

Rules Uncertainty

As Silicon Valley developers have pushed into health care, the industry has been at times uncertain about when it needed the FDA’s approval. In 2013, the consumer gene-testing company 23andMe Inc. was ordered by the agency to temporarily stop selling its health analysis product until it was cleared by regulators, for example.

Under the pilot, the FDA will scrutinize digital health companies’ software and will inspect their facilities to ensure they meet quality standards and can adequately track their products once they’re on the market. If they pass the agency’s audits, the companies would be pre-certified and may face a less stringent approval process or not have to go through FDA approval at all.

More than 100 companies were interested in the pilot, according to the FDA. The agency plans to hold a public workshop on the program in January to help developers not in the pilot understand the process and four months of initial findings.

You can read the original article here.

Source:

Edeny A. (27 September 2017). "Apple, Fitbit to join FDA program to speed health tech" [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address http://www.benefitspro.com/2017/09/27/apple-fitbit-to-join-fda-program-to-speed-health-t