Compliance Recap April 2018

April was a busy month in the employee benefits world.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) modified the 2018 health savings account (HSA) family contribution limit back to $6,900. The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Treasury released proposed frequently asked questions regarding mental health parity. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the 2019 parameters for the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit, a 2019 Benefit and Payment Parameters final rule, a transitional policy extension for non-grandfathered coverage in the small group and individual health insurance markets, and an assignment schedule for new Medicare beneficiary identifiers. The IRS released frequently asked questions on the employer credit for paid family medical leave. The Congressional Research Service (CRS) published a summary of federal requirements that apply to the private health insurance market.

 

UBA Updates
UBA released one new advisor: 2019 Benefit and Payment Parameters Final Rule
UBA updated existing guidance: Sample Open Enrollment Notices Packet

 

IRS Changes 2018 HSA Family Contribution Limit
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently released Revenue Procedure 2018-27 to modify the 2018 health savings account (HSA) family contribution limit back to $6,900. This is the second, and likely final, change in limit during 2018. As background, in May 2017, the IRS released Revenue Procedure 2017-37 that set the 2018 HSA family contribution limit at $6,900.

However, in March 2018, the IRS released Revenue Procedure 2018-10 that adjusted the annual inflation factor for some tax-related formulas from the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to a new factor called a “chained CPI.” As a result, the 2018 HSA family contribution limit was lowered to $6,850 from $6,900, retroactively effective to January 1, 2018. Stakeholders informed the IRS that the lower HSA contribution limit would impose many unanticipated administrative and financial burdens. In response and in the best interest of sound and efficient tax administration, the IRS will allow taxpayers to treat the originally published $6,900 limit as the 2018 HSA family contribution limit.

Excess Contribution Tax Treatment if Employee Received Distribution Based on Earlier Limit

DOL, HHS, and Treasury Release Proposed FAQs on Mental Health Parity
The U.S. Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Treasury (collectively,
the “Departments”) released proposed FAQs About Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity

Implementation and the 21st Century Cures Act Part XX.
The Departments respond to FAQs as part of implementing the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici
Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA).

Generally, the MHPAEA requires that the financial requirements (for example, coinsurance and copays)
and treatment limitations (for example, visit limits) imposed on mental health or substance abuse disorder
(MH/SUD) benefits cannot be more restrictive than the predominant financial requirements and treatment
limitations that apply to substantially all medical/surgical benefits in a class.

Similarly, a group health plan or issuer cannot impose a nonquantitative treatment limitation (NQTL) on
MH/SUD benefits that is more stringent than a comparable limitation that is applied to medical/surgical
benefits.

The MHPAEA regulations include express disclosure requirements. For example, if a participant requests
the criteria for medical necessity determinations regarding MH/SUD benefits, then the plan administrator
must make the information available to the participant.

To assist plan sponsors with disclosure requests, DOL released a revised draft Mental Health and
Substance Use Disorder Parity Disclosure Request that plan sponsors may provide to individuals who
request information from an employer-sponsored health plan regarding treatment limitations.

To assist plan sponsors in determining whether a group health plan complies with MHPAEA, the DOL
released its Self-Compliance Tool for the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act.

 

CMS Releases 2019 Parameters for Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Benefit
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the following parameters for the defined
standard Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit for 2019:


Generally, group health plan sponsors must disclose to Part D eligibility individuals whether the
prescription drug coverage offered by the employer is creditable. Coverage is creditable if it, on average,
pays out at least as much as coverage available through the defined standard Medicare Part D
prescription drug plan.

 

CMS Issues 2019 Benefit and Payment Parameters Final Rule
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published its 2019 Benefit and Payment
Parameters final rule. The rule primarily affects the individual health insurance market inside and outside
of the Exchange, the small group health insurance market, issuers, and the states.

Within the rule, three items most directly affect employers and their group health plans:
• Maximum annual out-of-pocket limit on cost sharing for 2019
• New methods for changing state EHB-benchmark plans
• New requirements for employers and issuers participating in the Small Business Health Options
Program (SHOP) Marketplace

 

CMS Issues Transitional Policy Extension
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a bulletin extending its transitional policy.

As background, in November 2013, CMS announced a transitional policy for non-grandfathered coverage
in the small group and individual health insurance markets. Under its policy, health insurance issuers may
choose to continue certain coverage that would otherwise be cancelled because of noncompliance with
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Public Health Service Act (PHS Act). Further,
affected small businesses and individuals may choose to re-enroll in such coverage.

Under its policy, non-grandfathered health insurance coverage in the small group and individual health
insurance markets will not be considered to be out of compliance with the following ACA and PHS Act
market reforms if certain criteria are met:
• Fair health insurance premiums
• Guaranteed availability of coverage
• Guaranteed renewability of coverage
• Prohibition of pre-existing condition exclusions or other discrimination based on health status,
with respect to adults, except with respect to group coverage
• Prohibition of discrimination against individual participants and beneficiaries based on health
status), except with respect to group coverage
• Non-discrimination in health care
• Coverage for individuals participating in approved clinical trials
• Single risk pool requirement

Under CMS’ transitional policy, states may permit issuers that have renewed policies under the
transitional policy continually since 2014 to renew such coverage for a policy year starting on or before
October 1, 2019. However, any policies renewed under this transitional policy must not extend past
December 31, 2019.

 

CMS Starts Assigning New Medicare Beneficiary Identifiers
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) started issuing new Medicare cards with a
Medicare Beneficiary Identifier (MBI) or Medicare number. The MBI will replace the Social Security
number-based Health Insurance Claim Number (HICN) for Medicare transactions such as billing, eligibility
status, and claim status.

New enrollees will be among the first to get these new cards. Current Medicare beneficiaries will get their
new cards on a rolling basis over the next few months.

Employers who are currently capturing the HICN for their active employee or retirees should update their
systems to accept the new MBIs.

 

IRS Releases FAQ on Employer Credit for Paid Family Medical Leave
The IRS released an FAQ that primarily reiterates the Tax Cuts an Jobs Act’s provisions that provide a
new federal credit for employers that provide paid family and medical leave to their employees.

The IRS explains that an employer must reduce its deduction for wages or salaries paid or incurred by the
amount determined as a credit. Also, any wages taken into account in determining any other general
business credit may not be used in determining this credit.

The IRS adds this definition of “paid family and medical leave” that, for purposes of the credit, includes
time off for:
• Birth of an employee’s child and to care for the child.
• Placement of a child with the employee for adoption or foster care
• To care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition
• A serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the functions of his or
her position
• Any qualifying exigency due to an employee’s spouse, child, or parent being on covered active
duty (or having been notified of an impending call or order to covered active duty) in the Armed
Forces.
• To care for a service member who is the employee’s spouse, child, parent, or next of kin

The FAQ also explains that, in the future, the IRS intends to address:
• When the written policy must be in place
• How paid “family and medical leave” relates to an employer’s other paid leave
• How to determine whether an employee has been employed for “one year or more”
• The impact of state and local leave requirements
• Whether members of a controlled group of corporations and businesses under common control
are treated as a single taxpayer in determining the credit

 

CRS Publishes Federal Requirements on Private Health Insurance Plans
The Congressional Research Service (CRS) published Federal Requirements on Private Health
Insurance Plans, which summarizes federal requirements that apply to the private health insurance
market, including a table that indicates whether a particular federal requirement applies to a fully-insured
large group plan, fully-insured small group plan, self-funded plan, or individual coverage.

Question of the Month
Q. What are the penalties for failing to comply with Section 125 requirements, such as failing to follow a
cafeteria plan document’s terms?

A. An operational failure occurs when a plan fails to follow its cafeteria plan document’s terms. There are
several potential penalties for operational failures, including:
• Cafeteria plan disqualification
• Requiring the cafeteria plan to comply with Section 125 and its regulations, including reversing
transactions that caused noncompliance
• Imposing employment tax withholding liability and penalties on the employer regarding pre-tax
salary reductions and elective employer contributions
• Imposing employment and income tax liability and penalties on employees regarding pre-tax
salary reductions and elective employer contributions

5/15/2018

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March 2018 Compliance Recap

From UBA Benefits, here is your March 2018 Compliance Recap - everything you need to know that's been happening in the employee benefits world.

March was a quiet month in the employee benefits world.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released a bulletin that lowered the family contribution limit for health savings account (HSA) contributions. The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) updated its model Premium Assistance Under Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program notice (CHIP notice).

The IRS issued its updated Employer’s Tax Guide to Fringe Benefits, issued transition relief regarding HSA eligibility of individuals with health insurance that provides benefits for male sterilization or male contraceptives without a deductible, and issued its updated Guide on Health Savings Accounts and Other Tax-Favored Health Plans.

UBA Updates

UBA released two new advisors:

UBA updated existing guidance: 2018 Annual Benefit Plan Card

IRS Releases Adjusted Annual Inflation Factor

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released its Internal Revenue Bulletin No. 2018-10 that adjusted the annual inflation factor from the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to a new factor called a chained CPI. This is retroactively effective to January 1, 2018.

As a result of the change, the family contribution limit for Health Savings Account contributions is lowered to $6,850 from $6,900. Individuals with family coverage who planned to contribute to the full family amount should decrease their contributions going forward.

Review our updated 2018 Annual Benefit Plan Card and read more.


DOL Updates Employer CHIP Notice

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) updated its model Premium Assistance Under Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program notice (CHIP notice).

Employers that provide health insurance coverage in states with premium assistance through Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) must provide their employees with the CHIP notice before the start of each plan year. The CHIP notice provides information to employees on how to apply for premium assistance, including how to contact their state Medicaid or CHIP office. The DOL usually updates its model CHIP notice biannually.

IRS Issues Updated Employer’s Tax Guide to Fringe Benefits

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued its 2018 Publication 15-B which contains information for employers on the employment tax treatment of fringe benefits. The guide is updated to reflect, among other items:

  • The suspension of qualified bicycle commuting reimbursements from an employee’s income for any tax year beginning after December 31, 2017, and before January 1, 2026.
  • The suspension of the exclusion for qualified moving expense reimbursements from an employee’s income for tax years beginning after December 1, 2017, and before January 1, 2026. However, the exclusion remains available for a U.S. Armed Forces member on active duty who moves because of a permanent change of station.
  • Limits on the deduction by employers for certain fringe benefits, such as meals and transportation commuting benefits.
  • The definition of items that aren’t tangible personal property for purposes of employee achievement awards.

The guide lists fringe benefits’ tax treatment in its Table 2-1 “Special Rules for Various Types of Fringe Benefits.”

IRS Issues Transition Relief Notice for Plans with Male Sterilization or Contraceptive Benefit

Recently, some states adopted laws that require certain health insurance policies to provide benefits for male sterilization and male contraceptives without cost-sharing.

However, under health saving account (HSA) eligibility requirements, a high deductible health plan (HDHP) generally may not provide benefits for any year until the minimum deductible for that year is satisfied. Although an HDHP may provide preventive care without a deductible or with a deductible that is below the minimum annual amount required by HSA eligibility requirements, male sterilization and male contraceptives are not considered preventive care under the Social Security Act or any Treasury Department guidance.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released its Notice 2018-12 (Notice) to clarify that if a health plan provides benefits for male sterilization or male contraceptives before satisfying the minimum deductible for an HDHP, then the plan is not an HDHP, regardless of whether state law requires coverage of such benefits. Further, an individual who is not covered by an HDHP with respect to a month is not an HSA-eligible individual and may not deduct contributions to an HSA for that month. Similarly, HSA contributions made by an employer on behalf of the individual are not excludible from income and wages.

To allow states time to change their laws so their residents will be able to purchase health insurance coverage that qualifies as an HDHP, the Notice provides transition relief for periods before 2020 to individuals who are, have been, or become participants in or beneficiaries of a health insurance policy that provides benefits for male sterilization or male contraceptives without a deductible or with a deductible below the minimum deductible for an HDHP.

During the transition relief period, an individual with this type of health insurance policy will not be treated as HSA-ineligible, merely because the policy fails to qualify as an HDHP.

IRS Issues Updated Guide on Health Savings Accounts and Other Tax-Favored Health Plans

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) updated its Publication 969 for taxpayers to use in preparing their 2017 returns. The publication explains health savings accounts (HSAs), medical savings accounts (Archer MSAs and Medicare Advantage MSAs), health flexible spending arrangements (FSAs), and health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs).

Question of the Month

  1. How does a person who is 65 years old or older maintain HSA eligibility and continue working? Also, when the person plans to retire, what should the person do about HSA contributions to avoid IRS penalties?
  2. To maintain HSA eligibility, an individual who is working and age 65 or older must:
  • Not apply for or waive Medicare Part A, and
  • Not apply for Medicare Part B, and
  • Waive or delay Social Security benefits.

For example, if a person delays Social Security benefits and delays Medicare Part A and B, retires at the end of April at the age of 65 or older, and applies for Social Security benefits and Medicare on May 1, 2018, then the general rule is that the person’s Social Security entitlement and Medicare Part A coverage will be retroactive for six months, meaning that the benefits would be retroactively effective as of November 2017.

IRS regulations state that a person can’t contribute to an HSA when the person has Medicare, so a person would need to stop contributing six months in advance of applying for Social Security benefits and Medicare. If a person contributes to an HSA after Medicare coverage begins, then the person may be subject to IRS penalties.

4/3/2018


Compliance Recap-February 2018

What's been happening in the employee benefits world? Get your latest updates on healthcare in this February 2018 Compliance Recap.


February was a quiet month in the employee benefits world.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) updated its Questions and Answers about Information Reporting by Employers on Form 1094-C and Form 1095-C, its Questions and Answers on Information Reporting by Health Coverage Providers, and its Questions and Answers on Employer Shared Responsibility Provisions Under the Affordable Care Act.

The IRS released its adjusted penalty amounts under the employer shared responsibility provisions for the 2018 calendar year. The IRS also released its Information Letter on COBRA HRA premium calculation. The IRS, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a proposed rule on short-term, limited-duration insurance.

UBA Updates

UBA released one new advisor: DOL Final Rule on Disability Claims Procedures: Eight Things to Know.

IRS Updates Its Employer Information Reporting Q&As

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) updated its “Questions and Answers about Information Reporting by Employers on Form 1094-C and Form 1095-C.” The IRS made one substantive change to the Q&As. At Q&A #5, the IRS provided the 2018 due dates for furnishing forms to employees and filing forms with the IRS.

For reporting in 2018 (for offers of coverage and coverage in 2017), an applicable large employer must furnish Form 1095-C to each full-time employee on or before March 2, 2018. This due date reflects a 30-day extension from the general due date (that is, January 31 of the year immediately following the calendar year to which the information relates); the extension was provided by the IRS in Notice 2018-06 on December 22, 2017. The extension applies automatically and does not require the submission of any request or other documentation to the IRS.

Generally, Forms 1094-C and 1095-C must be filed by February 28 of the year following the calendar year to which the return relates if filing on paper (or March 31 if filing electronically). The requirement to file Forms 1094-C and 1095-C is met if the forms are properly addressed and mailed on or before the due

 

date. If the due date falls on a weekend or legal holiday, then the due date is the following business day. A business day is any day that is not a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday. Although the IRS extended the due date for furnishing Form 1095-C for 2017, the due date for filing Forms 1094-C and 1095-C with the IRS was not extended.

IRS Updates Its Q&As on Information Reporting by Health Coverage Providers

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) updated its Questions and Answers on Information Reporting by Health Coverage Providers (Section 6055) by adding questions 30 through 35. Among other items, the Q&As discussed IRS Notice 2018-06 that extends the due date for furnishing the 2017 Form 1095-B to individuals to March 2, 2018.

Also, the IRS discussed short-term relief available from penalties for incomplete or incorrect returns filed with the IRS or furnished to individuals. For reporting in 2016, 2017, and 2018, the IRS will not impose penalties on employers that can show that they have made good faith efforts to comply with the information reporting requirements.

IRS Announces the Play-or-Pay Adjusted Penalty Amounts

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) updated its Questions and Answers on Employer Shared Responsibility Provisions Under the Affordable Care Act to reflect adjusted penalty amounts for failures to offer coverage in the 2018 calendar year. For Penalty A (or the “no offer” penalty), the adjusted penalty amount per full-time employee is $2,320. For Penalty B (or the “inadequate coverage” penalty), the adjusted penalty amount per full-time employee is $3,480.

IRS Releases Information Letter on COBRA HRA Premium Calculation

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released its Information Letter 2017-0027, which discusses how an employer determines a COBRA premium for a health reimbursement arrangement (HRA).

Under COBRA, an employer can charge a premium that is equal to the plan’s cost of the coverage for similarly situated beneficiaries to whom a qualifying event has not occurred, plus two percent for administrative expenses. COBRA permits the plan administrator to choose between one of two methods for determining COBRA premiums for the HRA. The applicable premium can be calculated either on an actuarial basis, or on a past cost basis.

IRS, DOL, and HHS Issue Proposed Rule on Short-Term Limited-Duration Insurance

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS), the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a proposed rule to amend the definition of short-term, limited-duration insurance for purposes of its exclusion from the definition of individual health insurance coverage.

Short-term, limited-duration insurance is designed to fill temporary gaps in coverage that may occur when an individual is transitioning from one plan or coverage to another. Because short-term, limited-duration insurance is not individual health insurance coverage, it is exempt from individual market requirements.

Under current regulations, short-term, limited duration insurance cannot provide coverage for three months or longer (including any renewal periods) and a specific written notice must be included in the contract and any application materials provided as part of enrollment.

The proposed rule would expand the potential maximum coverage period by nine months. The proposed rule would also revise the required notice that must appear in the contract and any application materials for short-term, limited-duration insurance.

Public comments are due by April 23, 2018.

Question of the Month

  1. When the plan changes, when should I give notice to participants?
  2. Depending on the change that is made, an employer must provide notice within one of three time frames:
  • 60 days prior to the change
  • No later than 60 days after the change (or, within 60 days of the change)
  • Within 210 days after the end of the plan year

For modifications to the summary plan description (SPD) that constitute a material reduction in covered services or benefits, notice is required within 60 days of adoption of the material reduction in group health plan services or benefits. For example, a decrease in employer contribution would be a material reduction in covered services or benefits so notice should be provided within 60 days of the change in employer contribution. As a best practice, an employer should give advance notice of the change. For practical purposes, employees should be told prior to the first increased withholding.

If a plan makes a material modification in any of the plan terms that would affect the content of the most recently provided summary of benefits and coverage (SBC), then notice must be provided no later than 60 days prior to the date on which the modification will become effective.

However, if the change is part of open enrollment, assuming you communicate the change during open enrollment, the open enrollment communication is considered acceptable notice, regardless of whether the SBC or the SPD, or both, are changing. Open enrollment is essentially a safe harbor for the 60-day prior/60-day post notice requirements.

Finally, changes that do not require more immediate notifications, because they do not affect the SBC and are not a material reduction in benefits, must be communicated through a summary of material modifications or an updated summary plan description within 210 days after the end of the plan year.

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HRL - White - House

Compliance Recap - January 2018

January was a busy month in the employee benefits world. On January 24, 2018, the U.S. Senate confirmed Alex Azar as the new Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) proposed regulations regarding association health plans. HHS released the 2018 federal poverty guidelines. The DOL issued updated civil monetary penalties for 2018 and announced the applicability date for final regulations regarding disability claims procedures. A U.S. District Court modified its order regarding the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's wellness regulations.

Congress and the President delayed the Cadillac tax's effective date, delayed the health insurance tax (HIT), and reauthorized the Children's Health Insurance Program. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released its Employer's Tax Guide. HHS issued a proposed rule to protect conscience rights in health care and created a new Conscience and Religious Freedom Division within HHS' Office of Civil Rights.

UBA Updates

UBA released seven new advisors in January:

UBA updated existing guidance: 2018 Annual Benefit Plan Amounts

DOL Issues Proposed Regulations Regarding Association Health Plans

The U.S. Department of Labor's (DOL) Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) issued a proposed rule which would broaden the definition of "employer" and the provisions under which an employer group or association may be treated as an "employer" sponsor of a single multiple-employer employee welfare benefit plan and group health plan under Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA).

The DOL posted 79 letters that were submitted as public comments as of January 31, 2018. The deadline for submitting public comments is March 6, 2018.

Read more about the proposed rule.

HHS Releases 2018 Federal Poverty Guidelines

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released the 2018federal poverty guidelines (FPL). For a family / household of one in the contiguous United States, the FPL is $12,140. In Alaska the FPL is $15,180, and in Hawaii the FPL is $13,960.

For 2018, applicable large employers that wish to use the FPL affordability safe harbor under the employer shared responsibility / play-or-pay rules should ensure that their lowest employee-only premium is equal to or less than $96.72 a month, which is 9.56% of the 2018 FPL.

Civil Monetary Penalties Inflation Adjustment for 2018

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published its civil monetary penalties for 2018. Under federal law, the DOL is required to annually adjust its regulations' civil monetary penalties for inflation no later than January 15 of each year. The adjusted penalty amounts are effective for violations occurring after November 2, 2015, that have penalties assessed after January 2, 2018.

Below are some examples of the increases.

Description 2017 Penalty Amount 2018 Penalty Amount
Failure to file Form 5500 $2,097 per day $2,140 per day
Failure to provide the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC) $1,105 $1,128
Failure to provide documents requested by the DOL $149 per day, not to exceed $1,496 per request $152 per day, not to exceed $1,527 per request
Failure to inform employees of children's health insurance program (CHIP) coverage opportunities; each employee is a separate violation $112 per day $114 per day

 

DOL Issues Final Disability Claims Procedures Regulations' Applicability Date

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced that April 1, 2018, will be the applicability date for its rule that amends the claims procedure requirements of ERISA-covered employee benefit plans that provide disability benefits. The DOL'sFact Sheet contains a summary of the regulation's requirements.

U.S. District Court Modifies Order Regarding EEOC Wellness Rules

In August 2017, the United States District Court for the District of Columbia heldthat the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) failed to provide a reasoned explanation for its decision to adopt 30 percent incentive levels for employer-sponsored wellness programs under both the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) rules and Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) rules.

In December 2017, the court vacated the EEOC rules under the ADA and GINA effective January 1, 2019, and ordered the EEOC to promulgate any new proposed rules by August 31, 2018.

In January 2018, the EEOC asked the court to reconsider the portion of the court's order that required the EEOC to promulgate new proposed rules by August 31, 2018. The court vacated that portion of its order. The court's order to vacate the portions of the EEOC's wellness rules under the ADA and GINA as of January 1, 2019, remains.

Read more about the court's order.

Congress Delays Cadillac Tax Effective Date, Delays HIT Tax, and Reauthorizes CHIP

Congress and the President passed H.R. 195, a short-term spending bill. The bill delays the effective date of the excise tax on high cost employer-sponsored health coverage ("Cadillac tax") to 2022. The bill delays the health insurance tax (HIT) that applies to insurers. The HIT was in effect in 2014, 2015, and 2016, and will be in effect for 2018. Now the HIT will be delayed from 2019 to 2020; essentially, the bill implemented a one-year moratorium for the HIT for 2019. The bill also reauthorizes the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) for six years.

IRS Issues 2018 Employer's Tax Guide

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued its Publication 15 (Circular E) Employer's Tax Guide that discusses employers' tax responsibilities. The guide generally discusses health insurance plans, health savings accounts, and medical care reimbursement.

HHS Issues Proposed Rule to Protect Conscience Rights in Health Care

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published a proposed rule titled "Protecting Statutory Conscience Rights in Health Care; Delegations of Authority."

HHS proposes this rule pursuant to President Trump's May 4, 2017, Executive Order 13798 "Promoting Free Speech and Religious Liberty" and the U.S. Attorney General's October 6, 2017, "Federal Law Protections for Religious Liberty"memorandum.

HHS proposes this rule to enhance awareness and enforcement of federal health care conscience laws and associated anti-discrimination laws, to further conscience and religious freedom, and to protect the right to abstain from certain activities related to health care services without discrimination or retaliation.

The rule cites several federal health care conscience laws and the activities that they protect, including:

·    The Church Amendments: conscience protections related to abortion and sterilization

·    The Coats-Snowe Amendment: conscience protections related to abortion, training, and accreditation

·    The Weldon Amendment: protections against discrimination for health care entities and individuals who do not further abortion or other services

·    HHS' 2011 final rule that enforces the Church, Coats-Snowe, and Weldon Amendments

·    The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2017: protections from discrimination for health care entities and individuals who object to furthering or participating in abortion under programs funded by HHS' annual appropriations

·    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: conscience protections related to assisted suicide, abortion, and the individual mandate to maintain minimum essential coverage

·    The Assisted Suicide Funding Restriction Act of 1997: protections for Medicare or Medicaid program providers and their employees from informing individuals about a right or service related to assisted suicide and from applying any advance directive term related to assisted suicide

·    Medicare and Medicaid: protection from being compelled to provide, reimburse for, or cover any counseling or referral service over a moral or religious objection

·    Global health program conscience and anti-discrimination protections

·    Exemptions from compulsory health care or services generally and under specific programs for hearing screening, occupational illness testing, suicide assessment or treatment services, vaccination, and mental health treatment

·    Conscience clauses related to religious nonmedical health care in Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

The proposed rule aims to revise the current regulatory framework of federal health care conscience protection statutes to a more robust regulatory framework similar to those that implement and enforce other civil rights laws.

To do so, the proposed rule would require written assurances and certifications of compliance with federal health care conscience and associated anti-discrimination laws as part of accepting federal financial assistance from HHS. The proposed rule would also require HHS and certain recipients to post a notice to the public, patients, and employees of their protections under the federal health care conscience and associated anti-discrimination statutes, including how to file a complaint with HHS' Office of Civil Rights (OCR). The proposed rule's Appendix A provides the notice's text. Further, the proposed rule would require recipients to report information about OCR investigation notices and compliance review letters to their applicable HHS funding source and to disclose complaints filed with OCR when applying for new or renewed federal financial assistance from HHS.

The proposed rule details OCR's authority to conduct outreach, provide technical assistance, initiate compliance reviews, receive and process complaints, and conduct investigations. The proposed rule grants OCR discretion to choose its means of enforcement, which will range from informal resolution to funding termination. The OCR may also refer cases to the U.S. Department of Justice for enforcement.

Public comments are due by March 27, 2018.

HHS Creates New Conscience and Religious Freedom Division

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced the new Conscience and Religious Freedom Division (CRFD) within HHS's Office of Civil Rights (OCR). According to HHS' press release, the CRFD will restore federal enforcement of laws that protect the rights of conscience and religious freedom. CFRD's website includes instructions on how to file a conscience or religious freedom complaint with OCR.

Question of the Month

Q. Can an employer exclude children from coverage based on a child's access to other coverage, employment status, or marital status?

A. No, if a group health plan provides dependent coverage, then the plan must generally make coverage available for children until age 26. These group health plans must not define dependent, for purposes of dependent coverage, in terms other than the relationship between the child and the plan participant.

This means that a plan cannot use items such as a child's access to other coverage, employment status, marital status, tax dependent status, residency, or student status to define dependent.

Also, if the employer is an applicable large employer, then it must offer coverage to its full-time employees' dependent children to avoid penalties under the employer shared responsibility provisions.


HRL - Man - Working - Laptop

Compliance Recap - December 2017

December was a relatively busy month in the employee benefits world.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) delayed the reporting deadlines in 2018 for the 1095-B and 1095-C forms to individuals. President Trump signed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released guidance on accommodation revocation notices.

A U.S. District Court vacated U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) wellness rules effective January 1, 2019. The U.S Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) issued Frequently Asked Questions to address employers’ duties regarding medical support notices.

The IRS released Form 8941 instructions regarding credit for small employer health insurance premiums and Form W-2 reporting guidance for Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangements (QSEHRAs).

UBA Updates

UBA updated existing guidance: Contraception Mandate Rolled Back for Employers

IRS Extends 2018 Deadlines for 1095-B and 1095-C Forms to Individuals

On December 22, 2017, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued Notice 2018-06, delaying the reporting deadlines in 2018 for the 1095-B and 1095-C forms to individuals. The 1095-B form is now due to the individual identified as the “responsible individual” on the form by March 2, 2018. The 1095-C form is now due to employees by March 2, 2018.

There is no delay for the 1094-C and 1094-B forms, or for forms due to the IRS.

Read more about the IRS Notice.

President Trump Signs Tax Bill

On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (Act) that, among other items, eliminates the individual mandate penalty under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). The Act reduces the penalty associated with the individual shared responsibility provision to zero, effective in 2019.

Per the Congressional Research Service’s summary, the bill amends the Internal Revenue Code to reduce tax rates and modify policies, credits, and deductions for individuals and businesses.

For businesses, the bill:

  • Reduces the corporate tax rate from a maximum of 35 percent to a flat 20 percent rate (25 percent for personal services corporations).
  • Allows increased expensing of the costs of certain property.
  • Limits the deductibility of net interest expenses to 30 percent of the business's adjusted taxable income.
  • Repeals the work opportunity tax credit.
  • Terminates the exclusion for interest on private activity bonds.
  • Modifies or repeals various energy-related deductions and credits.
  • Modifies the taxation of foreign income.
  • Imposes an excise tax on certain payments from domestic corporations to related foreign corporations.

The bill also repeals or modifies several additional credits and deductions for individuals and businesses.

In particular, the Act eliminates the business deduction for qualified mass transit and parking benefits starting in 2018, and eliminates the exclusion for bicycle commuting expenses for tax years 2018 through 2025. These benefits (except for bicycle commuting) will continue to be tax-exempt to employees. For 2018, employees can contribute up to a maximum of $260 per month for both qualified mass transit and parking expenses through an employer-sponsored qualified transportation plan under Section 132(f).

The Act’s elimination of the business deduction for qualified mass transit and parking benefits means that employers will be taxed on the value of providing qualified transportation fringe benefits.

CMS Releases Guidance on Accommodation Revocation Notices

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires that non-grandfathered group health plans and health insurance issuers offering non-grandfathered group or individual health insurance coverage provide coverage of certain specified preventive services without cost sharing. Under the ACA and interim final regulations, objecting entities could use an accommodation process as part of the exemption from the ACA’s requirement to provide contraceptive coverage.

If an entity wants to revoke the accommodation, then the regulations require that written notification be given to participants and beneficiaries. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released guidance on the two methods that can be used to provide accommodation revocation notices.

Read more about CMS’ guidance.

U.S. District Court Vacates EEOC Wellness Rules Effective January 1, 2019

On August 22, 2017, the United States District Court for the District of Columbia held that the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) failed to provide a reasoned explanation for its decision to adopt 30 percent incentive levels for employer-sponsored wellness programs under both the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) rules and Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) rules.

At that time, the court declined to vacate the EEOC’s rules because of the significant disruptive effect it would have. However, the court remanded the rules to the EEOC for reconsideration.

In September 2017, the EEOC filed a status report indicating its schedule to comply with the court order, including issuing a proposed rule by August 2018 and a final rule by October 2019. It stated that it did not expect to require employers to comply with a new rule before 2021.

The court found the EEOC’s process of not generating applicable rules until 2021 to be unacceptable. Instead, the court determined that one year was ample time for employers to adjust to new EEOC rules. The court vacated the EEOC rule effective January 1, 2019, and ordered the EEOC to promulgate any new proposed rules by August 31, 2018.

OCSE Issues FAQs Regarding Employers’ Duties Regarding Medical Support Notices

The U.S Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) issued its “Medical Support – Answers to Employers’ Questions” FAQs, which instruct employers and plan administrators how to complete Parts A and B of the National Medical Support Notice (NMSN). The FAQs also provide, among other items, the following guidance:

  • When a plan receives a request for information by a child support agency that issued an NMSN, the plan administrator is permitted to disclose protected health information in response to the NMSN under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).
  • Even if a recently terminated employee has elected self-only COBRA continuation coverage, a plan should enforce the NMSN to cover the child of that former employee. If the plan is subject to COBRA and if the child loses coverage due to a qualifying event, then the child is a qualified beneficiary with the right to elect COBRA continuation coverage.
  • A plan administrator may take all necessary steps to enroll the child named in the NMSN if coverage is available and the premiums can be deducted with the limits of the Consumer Credit Protection Act (CCPA). Such steps may include changing an employee’s coverage to a different option, even if it affects the employee’s premiums.

IRS Releases Form 8941 Instructions: Credit for Small Employer Health Insurance Premiums

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released its instructions for Form 8941 which eligible small employers use to figure the credit for health insurance premiums for tax years beginning after 2009. For tax years beginning after 2013, the credit is only available for period of two consecutive tax years. Generally, the maximum credit is a percentage of premiums that the employer has paid during the tax year for health insurance coverage that the employer provided to certain employees enrolled in a qualified health plan offered through the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP) Marketplace.

IRS Releases Form W-2 Reporting Guidance for QSEHRAs

The IRS released its Form 8962 with instructions. Form 8962 is used by individual taxpayers to calculate and report a premium tax credit. The instructions provide a reminder to employers who provided a Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangement (QSEHRA) to their eligible employees. For each employee covered under its QSEHRA, the employer should report the annual permitted benefit by indicating Code FF in Box 12 of the employee’s Form W-2.

Question of the Month

What code should an employer use for Form 1095-C Line 14 if:

  • the employer offers minimum essential coverage (MEC) providing minimum value (MV) to a full-time employee that is affordable (using the Federal Poverty Level safe harbor for affordability) and
  • the employer offers at least MEC to the employee’s spouse and dependents?

Does the code change if the employee declines coverage because the employee is covered by the spouse’s group health plan?

The employer should use Code 1A in Line 14. The code doesn’t change if the employee waives coverage.

 

Download the PDF

 


Compliance Bulletin: 2018 Minimum Wage Rates

The current federal minimum wage rate is $7.25 per hour. However, many states have adopted minimum wage rates higher than the federal rate. When the state rate and the federal rate are different, employers must pay their employees the higher rate.

Affected employers should review their employees’ pay rates and update their minimum wage poster notices as necessary to ensure compliance with local wage and hour regulations.

Download the following PDF for helpful charts and tables with wage rate information by state.

 


Tax Bill Shakes Up Health — From Medicare To The ACA To Medical Education

The tax bill that Republican lawmakers are finalizing would have wide-reaching effects on health issues. But the GOP still has negotiating ahead to get a bill that both the House and Senate will support. That hasn't stopped some party leaders from looking forward to additional plans to revamp programs such as Medicare and Medicaid.

The Associated Press: Q&A: Tax Bill Impacts On Health Law Coverage And Medicare The tax overhaul Republicans are pushing toward final votes in Congress could undermine the Affordable Care Act's health insurance markets and add to the financial squeeze on Medicare over time. Lawmakers will meet this week to resolve differences between the House- and Senate-passed bills in hopes of getting a finished product to President Donald Trump's desk around Christmas. Also in play are the tax deduction for people with high medical expenses, and a tax credit for drug companies that develop treatments for serious diseases affecting relatively few patients. (Alonso-Zaldivar, 12/5)

The Fiscal Times: 6 Critical Differences That Must Be Resolved in the Republican Tax Bills The Senate bill’s repeal of the Obamacare mandate saves about $318 billion over 10 years but threatens to destabilize the individual markets, resulting in higher premiums and millions fewer people with health insurance. While House Republicans aren’t likely to balk at including repeal in the final bill, it could still be a problem for Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME), a pivotal vote in the upper chamber, whose support for the final package could depend on Congress’s treatment of separate measures designed to stabilize the Obamacare markets. (Rainey, 12/4)

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Perdue Says Further Health Care Changes ‘Absolutely’ Needed As House and Senate lawmakers open another phase of negotiations over a $1.5 trillion federal tax overhaul, some Republicans are emboldened about pursuing new cuts to the system of health care entitlements. U.S. Sen. David Perdue said Monday that lawmakers should “absolutely” seek changes to the Medicaid and Medicare programs to help maximize the impact of the tax cuts. He echoed other Republican officials who have suggested a push for more spending cuts should be in the works. (Bluestein, 12/4)

 

Read the original brief.

Source:
Kaiser Health News (5 December 2017). "Tax Bill Shakes Up Health — From Medicare To The ACA To Medical Education" [Web blog post]. Retrieved from address https://khn.org/morning-breakout/tax-bill-shakes-up-health-from-medicare-to-the-aca-to-medical-education/


OSHA Delays Electronic Reporting to Dec. 15, 2017

OVERVIEW

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) electronic reporting rule requires certain establishments to report information electronically from their OSHA Forms 300, 300A and 301. Under the rule, the first electronic reports were due on July 1, 2017.

However, on Nov. 24, 2017, OSHA issued a new final rule officially delaying the first electronic reporting deadline to Dec. 15, 2017. Affected establishments will need to submit their reports through the Injury Tracking Application (ITA) website by that time or face possible OSHA penalties.

ACTION STEPS

  • Affected establishments must create an account on the ITA website and submit information from their 2016 OSHA 300A form by December 15, 2017.
  • Other deadlines under the electronic reporting rule remain unaltered. Therefore, affected establishments should begin their preparations to submit information from all 2017 OSHA forms by July 1, 2018.

OSHA’s electronic reporting rule affects establishments that:

  • Are already required to create and maintain OSHA injury and illness records and have 250 or more employees;
  • Have between 20 and 249 employees and belong to a high-risk industry; and
  • Receive a specific request from OSHA to create, maintain and submit electronic records, even if they would otherwise be exempt from OSHA recordkeeping requirements.

The electronic reporting rule applies to establishments, not employers. An employer may have several worksites or establishments. In these situations, some establishments may be affected while others are not.

To determine whether an establishment is affected, employers must determine each establishment’s peak employment during the calendar year. During this determination, employers must count every individual that worked at that establishment, regardless of whether he or she worked full-time, part-time, or was a temporary or seasonal worker.

Finally, a firm with more than one establishment may submit establishment-specific data for multiple establishments.

Reporting Requirements


The data an employer must submit and the timeline for submitting this information to OSHA depends on the establishment size.

Establishments with 250 or more employees will be required to submit information from their OSHA Forms 300A, 300 and 301. However, in 2017, these establishments will only be required to submit data from their 300A Form. Establishments in high-risk industries with between 20 and 249 employees will be required to submit information only from their OSHA Form 300A.

For the first reporting year, the deadline has been delayed to Dec. 15, 2017. However, the final rule that delayed the first deadline did not alter subsequent deadlines, so reporting deadlines for 2018, 2019 and beyond remain as shown in the table above.

Submitting the Report

The ITA is a secure website that OSHA created specifically for the data required by the electronic reporting rule. The ITA allows employers three options to submit their reports:

  1. Manual entry;
  2. Comma-separated value (CSV) file upload; and
  3. Application programming interface (API) transmission.

The ITA offers affected establishment instructions and sample files and templates to help them complete the submission process.

OSHA-approved State Plans

The final rule required OSHA-approved State Plans to adopt the electronic rule or “substantially identical” requirements within six months of the final rule’s publication date. The final rule was published on May 12, 2016. This means that OSHA-approved State Plans have the authority to adopt reporting requirements that go above and beyond what is required by the federal rule. For this reason, establishments located in OSHA-approved State Plan jurisdictions should consult with their local OSHA offices to make sure they are satisfying all electronic reporting requirements.

However, the following OSHA-approved State Plans have not yet adopted the requirement to submit injury and illness reports electronically:

Similarly, state and local government establishments in IL, ME, NJ and NY are not currently required to submit their data through the reporting website.

More Information

Contact Hierl Insurance Inc. or visit the OSHA tracking of workplace injuries and illnesses webpage for more information regarding electronic reporting.

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Compliance Recap - October 2017

October was a busy month in the employee benefits world. President Trump announced a new Acting Secretary for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Eric Hargan fills the position vacated by Tom Price, who resigned in late September 2017.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued the instructions for Forms 1094/1095 for the 2017 tax year, announced PCORI fees for 2017-18, and announced cost-of-living adjustments for 2018. President Trump issued an Executive Order on healthcare and announced an end to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's cost sharing reductions.

The IRS, Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued two interim final rules to allow a greater number of employers to opt out of providing contraception to employees at no cost through their employer-sponsored health plan.

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued a proposed rule to delay a disability claims procedure regulation's applicability date. The IRS provided additional guidance on leave-based donation programs' tax treatment and released an information letter on COBRA and Medicare. HHS released its proposed rule on benefits and payment parameters for 2019. The U.S. Department of the Treasury (Treasury) issued its Priority Guidance Plan for projects it intends to complete during the first half of 2018.

UBA Updates

UBA released seven new advisors in October:

UBA updated existing guidance:

IRS Issues 2017 Instructions for Forms 1094/1095

The IRS issued the instructions for Forms 1094-C and 1095-C for the 2017 tax year. Applicable large employers use Forms 1094-C and 1095-C to report information related to their employer shared responsibility provisions under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Read more about the instructions and forms.

IRS Announces PCORI Fee for 2017-18

The IRS announced the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) fee for 2017-18. The fee is $1.00 per covered life in the first year the fee is in effect. The fee is $2.00 per covered life in the second year. In the third through seventh years, the fee is $2.00, adjusted for medical inflation, per covered life.

For plan years that end on or after October 1, 2016, and before October 1, 2017, the indexed fee is $2.26. For plan years that end on or after October 1, 2017, and before October 1, 2018, the indexed fee is $2.39.

Read more about the PCORI fee.

IRS Announces Cost-of-Living Adjustments for 2018

The IRS released Revenue Procedures 2017-58 and Notice 2017-64 to announce cost-of-living adjustments for 2018. For example, the dollar limit on voluntary employee salary reductions for contributions to health flexible spending accounts (FSAs) is $2,650, for taxable years beginning with 2018.

Download the chart of 2018 annual benefit plan amounts.

Executive Order on Healthcare

On October 12, 2017, the White House released the Executive Order "Promoting Healthcare Choice and Competition Across the United States," signed by President Trump, that directs various federal agencies to explore options relating to association health plans, short-term, limited-duration insurance, and health reimbursement arrangements in the next 60-120 days.

Employers should not make any changes to their group health plans based on the Executive Order until regulations are issued.

Read more about the Executive Order.

President Trump Ends ACA Cost Sharing Reductions

President Trump announced that the ACA's cost sharing reductions for low income Americans would be stopped. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) confirmed that the payments would stop immediately.

Because the cost sharing reductions are different than the advance premium tax credit, this payment termination will not have a direct impact on employers at this time. However, employers with fully insured health plans might see group health plan rate increases in the future as insurance companies work to make up for revenue loss.

Read more about the payment termination.

Agencies Roll Back Contraceptive Mandate

The Internal Revenue Service, Employee Benefits Security Administration, and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued two interim final rules that were effective on October 6, 2017. These rules will allow a greater number of employers to opt out of providing contraception to employees at no cost through their employer-sponsored health plan.

The expanded exemption encompasses all non-governmental plan sponsors that object based on sincerely held religious beliefs, and higher education institutions' student health plan arrangements. The exemption also now encompasses employers who object to providing contraception coverage based on sincerely held moral objections and higher education institutions' student health plan arrangements. Further, if an insurance company has sincere religious beliefs or moral objections, it would be exempt from having to sell coverage that provides contraception. The exemptions apply to both non-profit and for-profit entities.

Read more about the contraceptive mandate rollback.

DOL Proposes Delay to Final Disability Claims Procedures Regulations' Applicability Date

The DOL issued a proposed rule to delay the applicability date of its final rule that amends the claims procedure requirements applicable to ERISA-covered employee benefit plans that provide disability benefits. The DOL's Fact Sheetcontains a summary of the final rule's requirements.

The DOL is delaying the applicability date from January 1, 2018, to April 1, 2018, to consider whether to rescind, modify, or retain the regulations and to give the public an additional opportunity to submit comments and data concerning the final rule's potential impact.

IRS Provides Additional Guidance on Leave-Based Donation Programs' Tax Treatment

Last month, the IRS provided guidance for employers who adopt leave-based donation programs to provide charitable relief for victims of Hurricane and Tropical Storm Irma. This month, the IRS issued Notice 2017-62 which extends the guidance to employers' programs adopted for the relief of victims of Hurricane and Tropical Storm Maria.

These leave-based donation programs allow employees to forgo vacation, sick, or personal leave in exchange for cash payments that the employer will make to charitable organizations described under Internal Revenue Code Section 170(c).

The employer's cash payments will not constitute gross income or wages of the employees if paid before January 1, 2019, to the Section 170(c) charitable organizations for the relief of victims of Hurricane or Tropical Storm Maria. Employers do not need to include these payments in Box 1, 3, or 5 of an employee's Form W-2.

IRS Releases Information Letter on COBRA and Medicare

The IRS released Information Letter 2017-0022 that explains that a covered employee's spouse can receive COBRA continuation coverage for up to 36 months if the employee became entitled to Medicare benefits before employment termination. In this case, the spouse's maximum COBRA continuation period ends the later of: 36 months after the employee's Medicare entitlement, or 18 months (or 29 months if there is a disability extension) after the employment termination.

CMS Releases 2019 Benefits Payment and Parameters Proposed Rule

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a proposed ruleand fact sheet for the 2019 Benefit Payment and Parameters. The proposed rule is intended to increase individual market flexibility, improve program integrity, and reduce regulatory burdens associated with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) in many ways, including updates and annual provisions to:

  • Essential health benefits
  • Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP)
  • Special enrollment periods (SEPs)
  • Exemptions
  • Termination effective dates
  • Medical loss ratio (MLR)

CMS usually finalizes the Benefit Payment and Parameters rule in the first quarter of the year following the proposed rule's release. November 27, 2017, is the due date for public comments on the proposed rule.

Almost all the topics addressed in the proposed rule would affect the individual market and the Exchanges, particularly the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP) Exchanges.

Of interest to small group health plans, CMS proposes to change how states will select essential health benefits benchmark plans. If CMS keeps this change in its final rule, then it will affect non-grandfathered small group health plans for benefit years 2019 and beyond.

Read more about the proposed rule.

Treasury Issues its Priority Guidance Plan

The Treasury issued its 2017-2018 Priority Guidance Plan that lists projects that it intends to complete by June 30, 2018, including:

  • Guidance on issues related to the employer shared responsibility provisions
  • Regulations regarding the excise tax on high cost employer-provided coverage ("Cadillac tax")
  • Guidance on Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Arrangements (QSE HRAs)

Question of the Month

Q: Although the transitional reinsurance fee (TRF) expired, why might an employer have one TRF remittance due in November?

A: The TRF premium stabilization program was in place from 2014 to 2016. Calendar year 2016 was the last year for which the TRF was required. HHS offered employers with self-insured plans with an option to pay the TRF in one or two payments. If an employer chose to pay in two installments for the 2016 benefit year, then the employer's first payment was due by January 17, 2017, and its second payment is due by November 15, 2017.


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Critical compliance changes for next year: An open enrollment checklist

Keeping up-to-date with health care is one of our top priorities. From HR Morning, here is a comprehensive list of everything you need to know so far going into 2018.


As HR pros immerse themselves in negotiating plan changes for this year’s open enrollment, it’s critical to keep these new 2018 regulation changes front and center.

To help, here’s a checklist of changes you’ll need to be aware of when making plan-design moves:

1. Mental Health Parity reg changes enforced

Beginning January 1, 2018, plans that require “fail first” or “step therapy” could violate the Parity Act’s “non-quantitative treatment limitation” (NQTL) rules. Under the NQTL rules, plans can’t be more restrictive for mental health/substance abuse benefits than they are for medical/surgical ones.

Here’s an example of a fail-first strategy: Requiring mental health or addiction patients to try an intensive outpatient program before admission to an inpatient treatment if the same restriction doesn’t apply to medical/surgical benefits.

2. New Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC) template

Under the ACA, plans were required to start using the new SBC template on or after April 1, 2017.

For calendar year plans, that means this is the first enrollment with the new template, which includes new coverage examples and updates about cost-sharing. You can find more details on and instructions for the new form here: bit.ly/temp544

3. Women’s preventive care

The Women’s Preventive Services Guidelines were updated for 2018 calendar plans to include a number of items that must be covered without any cost-sharing. The list includes breast cancer screenings for average-risk women, screenings for cervical cancer, diabetes mellitus and more.

 

See the original article here.

Source:

Bilski J. (17 October 2017). "Critical compliance changes for next year: An open enrollment checklist" [Web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://www.hrmorning.com/critical-compliance-changes-for-next-year-an-open-enrollment-checklist/