What's the Dish? Taylor Cerminara's Homemade Chocolate Ice Cream with Peanut Butter Swirls

Prior to joining our team, Taylor earned her Associates of Applied Sciences in Human Services and gained experience through her work at a skilled nursing facility.

In her free time, she enjoys the outdoors and when it's colder out, she loves to curl up with a good book.Some of her favorite hobbies include skiing, hiking, kayaking and canoeing...Read her full bio.

Dine In

Taylor loves making her Homemade Chocolate Ice Cream with Peanut Butter Swirls when she's dining in. Want to try it out? Try out her recipe below: 

• 3/4 cup sugar

• 1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

• 3 tbsp cornstarch

• 2 1/2 cups whole milk

• 3/4 cup heavy cream

• 1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, divided

• Peanut butter filling

• 3/4 cup smooth peanut butter

• 1 tbsp plus 1 tsp heavy cream

• Pinch of salt

In a small bowl whisk together the sugar, cocoa powder and cornstarch.

In a heavy bottom saucepan, warm milk over medium heat.

Add the sugar mixture to the warm milk and whisk out any lumps.

Continue to heat over a medium flame until the mixture just starts to boil.

It will be thick, close to the consistency of chocolate pudding.

Pour the chocolate mixture through a fine-mesh strainer into a large bowl.

Add the heavy cream and 3/4 cup of the chocolate chips to the bowl.

Stir the cream and chips into the chocolate mixture until everything melts and is a smooth consistency.

Put plastic wrap directly over the chocolate mixture – making sure it touches the mix. This keeps a thick skin from forming on your ice-cream base.

Refrigerate at least two hours, overnight if possible.

While the chocolate base is cooling, make your peanut butter swirl. You want to make the peanut butter swirl the same day you will be churning your ice cream.

In a small bowl, whisk together the peanut butter, heavy cream and salt. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside at room temperature.

When your chocolate mixture is completely cool, churn it according to your ice cream makers instructions.

When completely churned, add the remaining 1/4 cup chocolate chips into the mixture, stirring to completely incorporate the chips throughout the ice cream.

Spoon into a freezer-friendly container.

Add the peanut butter mixture by dropping spoonfuls on top of the chocolate ice cream and swirling it through with a butter knife or stiff spatula.

Be careful not to stir too much so you don’t completely incorporate the peanut butter, but have thick swirls of it running through the ice cream.

Cover and freeze for several hours before serving.

Dine Out

When Taylor isn't dining in, her favorite place to go is Trepanier's Backyard Grill & Bar. Click here for directions.

Don't forget to check in next month for another edition of Dish!

Looking for an experienced advisor who can help you build a better employee benefits strategy? Visit this page.


Cathleen Christensen's Easy White Chicken Chili

Every month, we are happy to celebrate a new recipe from one of our outstanding employees. In this month’s Dish, we feature Cathleen Christensen and her delicious, easy-to-cook White Chicken Chili! For this month’s Dish, Cathleen Christensen has given us her Dine In and Dine Out choices. Check them out below!

Dine In

Cathleen’s favorite Dine In recipe to enjoy with her family is Easy White Chicken Chili. Though it’s a great treat anytime, she especially loves it during cooler weather. Heres how she makes it:

Easy White Chicken Chili

Yield: 6-8 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 onion, chopped (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 3 (15-1/2 ounces) cans Great Northern beans, drained and rinsed (other white beans can be substituted like cannellini)
  • 2 cups cooked chicken, shredded
  • 1 (4 ounce) can diced green chiles, drained
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/8 teaspoon pepper
  • 3/4 cup sour cream
  • 1 1/2 cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese
  • (optional) Tabasco sauce

Instructions

  1. In a large stockpot over medium heat, sauté onions in oil until tender. Stir in remaining ingredients except sour cream and cheese.
  2. Simmer for 30 minutes, stirring frequently, until heated through. Shortly before serving, add sour cream and cheese. Stir until cheese is melted. If you like a little kick add a few shakes of Tabasco sauce.

Dine Out

Cathleen’s favorite place to eat out is Ala Roma Restaurant. Ala Roma offers delicious and authentic food, made from scratch using high quality ingredients.

You can visit their website here.

171 N Pioneer Rd, Fond du Lac, WI 54935

Thanks for joining us for this month’s Dish! If you try a recipe or restaurant, be sure to let us know. Don’t forget to come back next month for more yummy favorites!


Protect Yourself From Cyber Attacks

In today's world, a day does not pass without a large company being featured on the news because they are suffering from a data breach or hacking incident that has threatened personal information.

Cyber security is a concept that has become a high priority in the past five years. Since this issue is fairly new, demand for cyber insurance is emerging, since most cyber related claims are currently not covered under a standard insurance program. The questions that arise the most regarding cyber security and liability are about understanding the level of exposure a company's data faces and knowing what cyber coverage encompasses.

VP, Property & Casualty

Large companies are not the only ones at risk, it is often small businesses that are most vulnerable simply because they are not prepared. Most small (under 250 employees) businesses do not have the IT staff necessary to help protect a business. Even manufacturing companies are at risk because while credit card information is a large component, it is not the only type of attack. can you afford the risk of not protecting your employee, client and company data?

With 10+ years of experience addressing cyber risks, Hierl's process of approaching cyber security begins with an assessment of client's risk and exposure. This involves knowing what data a client has, who has access to it, how it's stored and how they are backing it up. Hierl can expertly evaluate the coverage that is necessary to keep an organization secure. 

Because it is an emerging coverage, cyber insurance plans are not standard. Hierl advises a three-fold type of coverage including:

  • Business coverage for customers and employees
  • Protection for your company and the data it houses
  • PR assistance of a security breach occurs 

The best policies offer assistance to help you to work through things if something was to ever happen, as well as forensic and technical assistance to determine how the breach occurred.

"Many Organizations that have suffered cyber-crime are sophisticated, big businesses. If they can't stop these attacks from happening, most other businesses can't either."

If it determined quickly that a breach has happened and a good backup exists a company can recover quickly and the attack is much less damaging. However, when a company's data gets out in the wild is when attacks become most expensive.

The 2016 Ponemon Institute Cost of Data Breach study reported that the average cost of a los record rose form $154 in 2015 to $158 in 2016. Even if, you only have 20 employees now and that doesn't seem all that bad... you need to think about how many employee records do you have from the past 10 years? Cyber-attacks don't just affect current records nor do they only target employee data  but client and company data too. This type of insurance is becoming a must have coverage for businesses because of how sophisticated these attacks have become.

Three reasons to explore cyber coverage for your business:

  1. There is a higher incidence of cyber crime
  2. The longer it takes to detect an contain a data breach, the costlier it becomes
  3. Effects of a cyber-attack extend beyond monetary and data losses to losing businesses and customers 

If you'd like to know more about protecting your company from a cyber breach, please reach out to Cathleen at 920.921.5921 or send her an email via cchristensen@hierl.com.

To download the full PDF click here.


Compliance Recap April 2018

April was a busy month in the employee benefits world.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) modified the 2018 health savings account (HSA) family contribution limit back to $6,900. The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Treasury released proposed frequently asked questions regarding mental health parity. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the 2019 parameters for the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit, a 2019 Benefit and Payment Parameters final rule, a transitional policy extension for non-grandfathered coverage in the small group and individual health insurance markets, and an assignment schedule for new Medicare beneficiary identifiers. The IRS released frequently asked questions on the employer credit for paid family medical leave. The Congressional Research Service (CRS) published a summary of federal requirements that apply to the private health insurance market.

 

UBA Updates
UBA released one new advisor: 2019 Benefit and Payment Parameters Final Rule
UBA updated existing guidance: Sample Open Enrollment Notices Packet

 

IRS Changes 2018 HSA Family Contribution Limit
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently released Revenue Procedure 2018-27 to modify the 2018 health savings account (HSA) family contribution limit back to $6,900. This is the second, and likely final, change in limit during 2018. As background, in May 2017, the IRS released Revenue Procedure 2017-37 that set the 2018 HSA family contribution limit at $6,900.

However, in March 2018, the IRS released Revenue Procedure 2018-10 that adjusted the annual inflation factor for some tax-related formulas from the Consumer Price Index (CPI) to a new factor called a “chained CPI.” As a result, the 2018 HSA family contribution limit was lowered to $6,850 from $6,900, retroactively effective to January 1, 2018. Stakeholders informed the IRS that the lower HSA contribution limit would impose many unanticipated administrative and financial burdens. In response and in the best interest of sound and efficient tax administration, the IRS will allow taxpayers to treat the originally published $6,900 limit as the 2018 HSA family contribution limit.

Excess Contribution Tax Treatment if Employee Received Distribution Based on Earlier Limit

DOL, HHS, and Treasury Release Proposed FAQs on Mental Health Parity
The U.S. Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Treasury (collectively,
the “Departments”) released proposed FAQs About Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Parity

Implementation and the 21st Century Cures Act Part XX.
The Departments respond to FAQs as part of implementing the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici
Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA).

Generally, the MHPAEA requires that the financial requirements (for example, coinsurance and copays)
and treatment limitations (for example, visit limits) imposed on mental health or substance abuse disorder
(MH/SUD) benefits cannot be more restrictive than the predominant financial requirements and treatment
limitations that apply to substantially all medical/surgical benefits in a class.

Similarly, a group health plan or issuer cannot impose a nonquantitative treatment limitation (NQTL) on
MH/SUD benefits that is more stringent than a comparable limitation that is applied to medical/surgical
benefits.

The MHPAEA regulations include express disclosure requirements. For example, if a participant requests
the criteria for medical necessity determinations regarding MH/SUD benefits, then the plan administrator
must make the information available to the participant.

To assist plan sponsors with disclosure requests, DOL released a revised draft Mental Health and
Substance Use Disorder Parity Disclosure Request that plan sponsors may provide to individuals who
request information from an employer-sponsored health plan regarding treatment limitations.

To assist plan sponsors in determining whether a group health plan complies with MHPAEA, the DOL
released its Self-Compliance Tool for the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act.

 

CMS Releases 2019 Parameters for Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Benefit
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released the following parameters for the defined
standard Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit for 2019:


Generally, group health plan sponsors must disclose to Part D eligibility individuals whether the
prescription drug coverage offered by the employer is creditable. Coverage is creditable if it, on average,
pays out at least as much as coverage available through the defined standard Medicare Part D
prescription drug plan.

 

CMS Issues 2019 Benefit and Payment Parameters Final Rule
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published its 2019 Benefit and Payment
Parameters final rule. The rule primarily affects the individual health insurance market inside and outside
of the Exchange, the small group health insurance market, issuers, and the states.

Within the rule, three items most directly affect employers and their group health plans:
• Maximum annual out-of-pocket limit on cost sharing for 2019
• New methods for changing state EHB-benchmark plans
• New requirements for employers and issuers participating in the Small Business Health Options
Program (SHOP) Marketplace

 

CMS Issues Transitional Policy Extension
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a bulletin extending its transitional policy.

As background, in November 2013, CMS announced a transitional policy for non-grandfathered coverage
in the small group and individual health insurance markets. Under its policy, health insurance issuers may
choose to continue certain coverage that would otherwise be cancelled because of noncompliance with
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Public Health Service Act (PHS Act). Further,
affected small businesses and individuals may choose to re-enroll in such coverage.

Under its policy, non-grandfathered health insurance coverage in the small group and individual health
insurance markets will not be considered to be out of compliance with the following ACA and PHS Act
market reforms if certain criteria are met:
• Fair health insurance premiums
• Guaranteed availability of coverage
• Guaranteed renewability of coverage
• Prohibition of pre-existing condition exclusions or other discrimination based on health status,
with respect to adults, except with respect to group coverage
• Prohibition of discrimination against individual participants and beneficiaries based on health
status), except with respect to group coverage
• Non-discrimination in health care
• Coverage for individuals participating in approved clinical trials
• Single risk pool requirement

Under CMS’ transitional policy, states may permit issuers that have renewed policies under the
transitional policy continually since 2014 to renew such coverage for a policy year starting on or before
October 1, 2019. However, any policies renewed under this transitional policy must not extend past
December 31, 2019.

 

CMS Starts Assigning New Medicare Beneficiary Identifiers
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) started issuing new Medicare cards with a
Medicare Beneficiary Identifier (MBI) or Medicare number. The MBI will replace the Social Security
number-based Health Insurance Claim Number (HICN) for Medicare transactions such as billing, eligibility
status, and claim status.

New enrollees will be among the first to get these new cards. Current Medicare beneficiaries will get their
new cards on a rolling basis over the next few months.

Employers who are currently capturing the HICN for their active employee or retirees should update their
systems to accept the new MBIs.

 

IRS Releases FAQ on Employer Credit for Paid Family Medical Leave
The IRS released an FAQ that primarily reiterates the Tax Cuts an Jobs Act’s provisions that provide a
new federal credit for employers that provide paid family and medical leave to their employees.

The IRS explains that an employer must reduce its deduction for wages or salaries paid or incurred by the
amount determined as a credit. Also, any wages taken into account in determining any other general
business credit may not be used in determining this credit.

The IRS adds this definition of “paid family and medical leave” that, for purposes of the credit, includes
time off for:
• Birth of an employee’s child and to care for the child.
• Placement of a child with the employee for adoption or foster care
• To care for the employee’s spouse, child, or parent who has a serious health condition
• A serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform the functions of his or
her position
• Any qualifying exigency due to an employee’s spouse, child, or parent being on covered active
duty (or having been notified of an impending call or order to covered active duty) in the Armed
Forces.
• To care for a service member who is the employee’s spouse, child, parent, or next of kin

The FAQ also explains that, in the future, the IRS intends to address:
• When the written policy must be in place
• How paid “family and medical leave” relates to an employer’s other paid leave
• How to determine whether an employee has been employed for “one year or more”
• The impact of state and local leave requirements
• Whether members of a controlled group of corporations and businesses under common control
are treated as a single taxpayer in determining the credit

 

CRS Publishes Federal Requirements on Private Health Insurance Plans
The Congressional Research Service (CRS) published Federal Requirements on Private Health
Insurance Plans, which summarizes federal requirements that apply to the private health insurance
market, including a table that indicates whether a particular federal requirement applies to a fully-insured
large group plan, fully-insured small group plan, self-funded plan, or individual coverage.

Question of the Month
Q. What are the penalties for failing to comply with Section 125 requirements, such as failing to follow a
cafeteria plan document’s terms?

A. An operational failure occurs when a plan fails to follow its cafeteria plan document’s terms. There are
several potential penalties for operational failures, including:
• Cafeteria plan disqualification
• Requiring the cafeteria plan to comply with Section 125 and its regulations, including reversing
transactions that caused noncompliance
• Imposing employment tax withholding liability and penalties on the employer regarding pre-tax
salary reductions and elective employer contributions
• Imposing employment and income tax liability and penalties on employees regarding pre-tax
salary reductions and elective employer contributions

5/15/2018

Download the full recap here.


Bettering Health Plan Management Through Modern Healthcare Technology

Taking advantage of modern technology is part of the reason why Hierl excels in providing the best results for our clients. In this installment of CenterStage, we asked our Executive Vice President, Scott Smeaton, to give an in-depth overview of how we use our technological resources to create customized, high-quality, low-cost health plans for our clients.

Technology and Data

There are three steps to developing plans for our clients, when using technology and data. The first step is to identify the client’s cost drivers within their health program(s). For example, we may look at a client’s claims data and find their highest dollar claims are musculoskeletal – such as hip and knee replacements – identifying whether health plan members are going to the higher cost, lower quality provider. These are becoming much more prevalent and are among most plans top cost drivers. With the technology at Hierl, we can import our client’s data – medical and prescription claims and health screening results from wellness – and aggregate it into one technology platform. Doing so, will help keep our clients’ members updated on physician requests and advice.

Competitive Advantage

The second step beyond identifying our client’s cost drivers is to implement management programs and plan designs to address their health plan issues. This kind of technology is newer to the healthcare industry. It can be a great resource and tool that larger employers can use to their advantage. Think about Netflix. They analyze their viewer’s behaviors and apply predictive modeling in a way that they know what their viewers like to watch and when they want to watch it, incorporating those preferences into the ads their customers see. That kind of technology is coming to healthcare, allowing us to look at all claims and behaviors and predict where the next large claim will come from. This helps plan administrators fully understand what’s driving their health plan costs and do something about it through plan design changes, provider relations and contracting, member incentives, and member education and engagement.

Employee Betterment

After identifying areas that can be improved upon and creating a plan to address these cost drivers as discussed above, our third and final step is to create a communication program that will engage and educate employees. Our goal is to help employees understand that, within a healthcare system, there are some providers who perform better than others and cost less. When we give employees the tools and resources they need to be better healthcare consumers, everyone wins. Employer sponsored health plans have lower overall costs. This means their employees and their families lower their out-of-pocket costs, save healthcare dollars for the future, and have better outcomes. Not to mention that a happier, healthier employee is also a more productive employee at work and in the community. Hierl accomplishes this with our “Why Matters” program, which is a custom designed, year-round member education and communication program using a variety of mediums to reach our clients’ members. Through Why Matters, Hierl builds a custom (intranet) and mobile app for our clients to access basic information about their benefits 24/7. Think of it as a homepage to one of your favorite websites that you bookmark in your browser. This is where your members go to research, make decisions, educate themselves on your benefit offerings and how to be a better healthcare consumer. Based on the cost drivers identified through the process above we build out a 12-month calendar of communication materials specifically addressing the areas we’ve identified as a concern and can be delivered via paper, email, mobile app, etc.

Hierl strives to bring our clients the best possible solutions that result in high-quality, low-cost benefits. If you think your company needs to take this step toward improvement, please contact Scott Smeaton at 920.921.5921 or send him an email at ssmeaton@hierl.com.


LIMRA aims to shape benefits data exchange standard

How will LIMRA shape the benefits data exchange standard? Find out in this article from Benefits Pro.

LIMRA wants to help develop electronic data transmission standards for the employee benefits market.

The life and health market research group, has formed an alliance with the Object Management Group (OMG), a nonprofit technology standards group based in Needham, Massachusetts.

LIMRA has been working on the benefits market data standards issue for more than a year.

To help benefits market players develop standards, OMG has set up a Workplace Benefits Domain Task Force. The chairs of the new task force are Edie Bice of Unum; InAh Chambers of LIMRA; and Aaron Roby of Texas Life.

The task force organizers hope to develop data exchange standards for non-medical, non-retirement benefits.
The standards could apply both to group benefits and to individual benefits products sold at the worksite.

Organizers say the new task force will be open to benefits brokers, independent benefit plan administrators, benefits administration technology vendors, and insurers that offer non-medical, non-retirement employee benefits products.

The task force will start its first face-to-face meeting June 18, in Boston.

Source:
Bell A. (4 May 2018). "LIMRA aims to shape benefits data exchange standard" [web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://bit.ly/2wfIZey


These 3 industries are leading the way in HDHP adoption

Interested in knowing which industries are leadig the way in HDHP adoption? Check out this blog article.

Employers in the education, health care, manufacturing and retail sectors are using a variety of tactics to drive selection of HDHPs, with varying levels of adoption from employees, so says the report, based on anonymous employee benefit election data on the Benefitfocus Platform from more than 540 large employers in those sectors.

In the education sector, HDHPs are becoming less the exception, more the rule.

“Back in 2016, traditional health plans like PPOs and HMOs represented an overwhelming majority of health plan offerings and elections among employers in the education industry,” the authors write. “But just two short years later, things look completely different. In an industry known historically for its generous health insurance benefits, the HDHP has made remarkable gains in popularity.”

The share of employers in the education sector offering at least one HDHP has more than doubled since 2016, from 23 to 50 percent, according to the report. Employers have done a lot to make HDHPs attractive — they now pay 87 percent of the total HDHP premium and have doubled their contribution to employees’ HSAs since 2016. Their efforts have worked — 34 percent of employees selected an HDHP when given the choice for 2018, up from 20 percent two years ago.

In the health care sector, employers are encouraging consumer-driven plans with moderate success, according to the report.

“Over the past two years, employers in the health care industry have taken steps to shift more health insurance costs onto employees, while providing ways to help them manage the additional burden,” the authors write. “But there remains a long runway of opportunity for these organizations to boost adoption of the consumer-driven health care model.”

The number of employers offering HDHPs has nearly doubled in two years, with 73 percent offering at least one in 2018, up from 41 percent in 2016. However, despite there efforts, only 27 percent of employees selected an HDHP for 2018. Health care employers are likely trying to raise the adoption rate by transferring more PPO plan costs onto workers — the average employee premium contribution for a single-coverage PPO is up 24 percent from 2016.

In the manufacturing sector, despite boom in HDHP offerings among those employers, more of their workers are still opting for PPOs. “Manufacturing employers have displayed a particularly strong and growing enthusiasm for HDHPs in recent years,” the authors write. “But cost-sharing dynamics appear to be driving employees away from these plans and back into traditional health plans. Meanwhile, voluntary benefits maintain above-average popularity among both employers and employees.” The majority (88 percent) of employers in manufacturing now offer an HDHP, up from 54 percent in 2016. However, the percentage of employees electing an HDHP continues to decrease, while PPO participation grew from 36 percent in 2016, to 57 percent for 2018.

The report also found that voluntary benefits have become increasingly prevalent among manufacturers, with nearly 60 percent of employers offering at least one for 2018, up from 34 percent in 2016.

In the retail sector, employees shoulder more health plan costs, while more employers offer voluntary benefits to supplement coverage, according to the report.

“As employers in the retail industry look to keep benefit costs under control, health care is getting more expensive for their employees,” the authors write. “And while voluntary benefits offer additional financial protection for the majority of these workers, there remains a long runway of opportunity for health spending accounts to help them manage their out-of-pocket liabilities.”

Retail employers offering at least one HDHP increased from 55 percent in 2016 to 76 percent. Nearly half (40 percent) of their employees elected HDHPs, but premiums for these plans are rising, with the average annual employee contribution for a single-coverage HDHP up nearly 20 percent since 2016.

Despite HDHP prevalence, retail employers contributed 40 percent less to HSAs than the average for all employers, and employees contributed 20 percent less than peers in other industries. To supplement coverage, 56 percent of employers offered at least one voluntary benefit, up from 43 percent in 2016.

“Everywhere you turn there’s a story about rising health care costs,” says Ray August. “What employers in every industry have in common is the struggle to economically provide the best plans and care for their employees.”

Source:
Kuehner-Hebert K. (7 May 2018). "These 3 industries are leading the way in HDHP adoption" [web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://bit.ly/2FUf4Ii


4 actions HR departments should take to prepare for GDPR

In this article from Benefits Pro, we are going to take a look at the top four actions HR departments should take to prepare for GDPR. Continue reading:

A few years ago, Mark Cuban famously advised that data is the new gold. However, things have changed since the Cambridge Analytica and Facebook scandal as the public has become increasingly concerned with how companies are using their personal information.

As businesses prepare for the arrival of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), leaders could be forgiven for thinking that data can become more of a liability than an asset – depending on its handling.

GDPR is a much-needed update to data protection that aims to strengthen and unify security for everyone in Europe. The legislation goes live on May 25, 2018 and will enforce all businesses to secure and manage the personal data of all individuals living within the European Union.

After years of gathering data, we are now entering a new era where trust and transparency are the new global currency. GDPR will affect all businesses that store any aspect of personally identifiable information of all individuals, both customer and employee, living in the EU, whether or not that business has an office there.

The scope of GDPR includes employee data, so it directly affects HR departments. As a result, companies need to update processes around the lifecycle of basic employee personal data such as health information and family details.There are many resources surrounding the topic; some on which include free, user-friendly materials published by the EU governments in addition to those that act as “scaremongers” seeking to try to trick companies into paying for compliance help. What makes it most difficult for HR professionals is interpreting the rule, which was written broadly to address any type of personal data and applying it to employee data and HR practices, specifically. Compliance cannot be achieved overnight or ready for the big “go live” in May either. An entirely new way of working to understand where every aspect of data is obtained, how it is used, and where it is stored needs to be put in place. In short, this is not a job for the IT department alone, but rather requires a highly collaborative effort across the company. Silos will need to be broken down to efficiently unify all departments such as sales, marketing, finance, IT, and legal to understand the scale of how much data businesses are actively storing. But what do HR professionals need to know?

1. Create new or updated privacy policies
New privacy policies likely need to be created and implemented to reflect the new rights of employees. Equally, all existing policies should to be reviewed to determine which ones require updating to fall in line with GDPR’s transparency and accountability requirements.

In addition, a key difference between the current EU data rules and the GDPR is the emphasis on individual rights. Employees can now request that their data be completely erased at any time or request a copy of their data thats on file. HR teams need to be prepared to uphold these demands.

2. Revisit outdated processes
Reviewing HR processes, like onboarding a new employee, will help reveal what data you’re collecting that you don’t necessarily have a need for. Minimization is key to successful GDPR compliance; less is more. Implementing minimization will likely require you to update protocols and rethink processes that include the requesting of personal data from employees. For example, the onboarding and transfer of employees will need to be revisited to ensure that data collection practices meet GDPR requirements. You may also need to revisit your record retention policies and processes for ex-employees.

Ask your partners and vendors for their GDPR and compliance plan as risk is shared when they handle employee data on your behalf…

3. Allow data access only to those who really need it
The rise of shadow IT and sensitive data being increasingly stored in the public cloud combined with malware in cloud SaaS applications are the more significant concerns. CIOs and IT leaders now have the power to implement stronger cybersecurity and secure data-management policies that will protect personal data now and in the future. Security elements of the legislation demand that appropriate technical and organizational measures are taken to ensure all employee data is kept safe. HR’s responsibility is to ensure that only those who need access to personal data to do their job have access to it. Making sure that the right people have the appropriate access levels within a digital HR platform – or keys to the file cabinet – is the secret to successful compliance.

4. Centralize your employee file management
Learning about and documenting every element of employee data, where it is stored, and who has access is a process made much easier with centralized digital files. Going forward, a digital system makes it possible for HR to implement and internally audit procedures that will ultimately provide them with the visibility into compliance as well as potential vulnerabilities. GDPR and employee expectations means companies need to shift from a reactive to a proactive approach. A digital system is necessary to enable HR with visibility across their data, securely manage access to the data and implement at scale and policy changes.. With GDPR, the stakes are increasing yet again for companies; HR now must think about collecting the least amount of data they need to get the job done and being completely transparent around its usage, rather than burying this information in complicated terms and conditions. Sure, this will dramatically change the way companies globally deal with EU citizens’ data, but it’s something to be embraced rather than feared. By showcasing implementation of these new data protection practices, a brand can actually build its reputation. While board members might fear the ramifications of the GDPR, we all know that the breach of company data is something far worse. For these reasons alone, GDPR should be seen as an opportunity for every employee to focus on protecting their personal data or at least understanding their responsibilities. And for employers, take this opportunity to become more open to a review of outdated practices and investing in and building technology that can complement this forward thinking approach. Data protection compliance is now an on-going priority and its beneficial for all to take seriously.

Source:
Gouchan A. (4 May 2018). "4 actions HR departments should take to prepare for GDPR" [web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://bit.ly/2wl6ZwU


Why Work? For More than the Money

Discovering the individualized reasons people work is key to helping employers understand what will motivate employees.

According to the article "What People Want from Work: Motivation" on the website The Balance, successful companies need to start with money. Paying employees fair compensation, or ideally more than fair, brings the talent in and reduces the risk of losing great employees. Money helps employees check off responsibilities ranging from taking care of the most basic necessities to enjoying hobbies to long-term planning for retirement.

Turns out, it takes more than money, though. 

While many managers assumed money is the biggest factor, it is only one part of an ecosystem of motivation. Knowing that there are other reasons that get people up and out of bed to head to work can help employers better meet employee needs.

What were some of those factors?

Personal time and attention from a manager, the opportunity to feel known and praised for good work, was the top motivator for workers. Being valued, it turns out, can be as valuable as monetary compensation.

What's more, people want to see that the opposite is also true. Lack of consequences and failure to discipline for not performing is cited as a main demotivator, along with paying those less successful workers the same wage.

Beyond fair pay and managerial recognition, what other factors did workers mention? More control over work, including feeling like they have a say in decision making and goal setting, was one element. Likewise, a feeling of control over schedules and work environments also mattered. Flexibility is a major motivator for many employees. 

Another motivator surrounded opportunity. Both growth opportunities within a role and opportunities for advancement in an institution ranked highly for employees. Access to education and training as well as understanding succession planning and what was needed to be promoted (and that promotions were possible) impact morale and retention.

The big takeaway? While motivation is different for every employee, it is potentially easier than you think to understand what will motivate your employees. Ask them. Many easy, low-cost options abound which, if done well, free up time and money from other efforts that may not yield the assumed results. Pay attention, and you'll find yourself working with motivated, engaged people.

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