April 2018 Safety Matters: Elevator Best Practices

Elevator Best Practices

Millions of employees use elevators each day at work. While elevators are considered one of the safest forms of transportation, it is important to follow best practices and safety precautions when using an elevator.

Boarding the Elevator

Take note of the following procedures for entering an elevator:

  • Make sure you are aware of the risks associated with riding the elevator prior to boarding, such as falls and accidents.
  • Allow all passengers to fully exit the elevator before you begin boarding.
  • Watch your step when entering the elevator, as it may not be exactly level to the floor.
  • Steer clear of the doors once you enter the elevator. Keep all clothes, carry-ons and body parts within the car. Never attempt to stop a closing door.
  • Pay attention to the elevator’s capacity limit. Do not attempt to board an elevator that has reached capacity.

Riding the Elevator

Keep in mind the following procedures for riding an elevator:

  • Stand as close to the elevator wall as possible. Be sure to leave as much room as possible for others.
  • Pay close attention to floor indications and transitions to ensure you are able to exit at the right time.
  • Press the “door open” button in the event of the elevator stopping on a floor without opening its doors.
  • Be courteous of other passengers on the elevator. Do not push other riders in front of you when exiting and be sure to move out of the way of passengers when they exit the elevator.

Watch your step as you exit to avoid tripping on uneven ground.

In Case of Emergency

Although rare, elevator accidents and malfunctions do happen. Keep in mind the following procedures in the event of an elevator emergency:

  • Never use an elevator in the event of a fire. Always take the stairs.
  • Remain calm at all times. If you are in a stalled elevator, utilize the alarm button or phone button to contact emergency services.
  • Reassure those who are panicked in the situation. Remind everyone that they are safe inside the elevator.
  • Do not engage in horseplay.
  • Do not try to exit the elevator or pry open the doors. Always wait for trained professionals to arrive.

While elevators are considered one of the safest forms of transportation, it is important to encourage best practices and safety precautions to all employees or building occupants that frequent the elevator.

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RISK INSIGHTS: April 2018

The #MeToo movement.

The #MeToo movement has spread across the globe since gaining traction in Hollywood, and small business owners should see it as a wake-up call for preventing sexual harassment in the workplace.

Small Businesses Most Vulnerable to Sexual Harassment Claims

In wake of the #MeToo movement, awareness of sexual harassment has increased, but not necessarily at small businesses. Unlike their larger counterparts, small businesses are more vulnerable to sexual harassment claims because they’re less likely to have formal workplace policies in place.

According to the CNBC/SurveyMonkey Small Business Survey of more than 2,000 small business owners, only half of businesses with 5-49 employees had formal sexual harassment policies in place. That number decreased to 39 percent at businesses with less than five employees. That’s a stark contrast to businesses with 50 or more employees, as 85 percent said they had formal sexual harassment policies in place.

Eleven percent of the businesses surveyed said they issued companywide reminders of their sexual harassment policies and reporting procedures as a result of the #MeToo movement and other high-profile sexual harassment accusations. Nine percent said they’ve reviewed policies regarding diversity and gender equality. Seven percent have required new or additional training, and 4 percent have issued new reporting procedures. However, 61 percent of all businesses surveyed did not take any of the above precautions.

Role of HR

Complicating matters for small businesses is that two-thirds of those surveyed lacked an official human resources professional, meaning that the business owner was responsible for handling any harassment claims.

Only 3 percent said it was the job of human resources personnel to handle harassment issues and 10 percent said they had no specified way to handle harassment at all. Without a designated, unbiased person to speak to about harassment, employees may be afraid to report it for fear of retaliation.

Protect Your Business

A lack of a formal policy and procedures for handling sexual harassment in the workplace doesn’t mean that a business owner is exempt from liability. Although federal law exempts small businesses with less than 15 employees from the requirement to have a sexual harassment policy, it’s in their best interest to establish one.

Other than the fact that state laws may have smaller thresholds for requiring a formal policy, the financial and reputational costs are too high to risk running a business without one.

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Commercial Risk Advisor - April 2018

Insurance carriers, courts and regulatory agencies will begin to examine businesses closely to ensure that they take sexual harassment seriously and take steps to protect their employees and customers.

It’s always been important to protect your business and employees from sexual harassment, but recent high-profile cases show the importance of re-examining this topic at your business. Social movements such as the “Me Too” campaign have drawn attention to sexual harassment in the workplace, resulting in a growing number of misconduct allegations. These allegations can result in a wide variety of claims and lead to serious financial and reputational damage.

Insurance carriers, courts and regulatory agencies will begin to examine businesses closely to ensure that they take sexual harassment seriously and act to protect their employees and customers.

3 Questions to Ask When Addressing Sexual Harassment at Your Business:

How do you encourage employees to report inappropriate conduct?

The best way to address sexual harassment allegations is to respond quickly. Employees should be regularly reminded that there won’t be any retaliation for reporting inappropriate behavior. You should also ensure that there are multiple ways for employees to make anonymous reports to management.

Does your employee harassment training address your workplace’s unique traits?

A standard workplace policy is a good starting point for addressing sexual harassment, but you should also think about how your employees interact with co-workers and customers.

Do your insurance policies include exclusions for sexual harassment?

Many commercial general liability policies exclude claims for sexual harassment. Although employment practices liability insurance can provide you with coverage, you also need to ensure that policy periods offer coverage throughout the statute of limitations in your area.

1 in 8 drivers are uninsured and liable for damage and medical bills, according to a new study.

Even if you don't use commercial vehicles, employees who use their personal vehicles for any kind of business-related task can put you at risk:

25% of all vehicles in the United States are used for business in some way.
The average uninsured motorist claim is almost $20,000
Most personal auto policies don't provide coverage for uninsured or underinsured drivers without an endorsement.

Uninsured drivers cause about 1 out of every 8 accidents.

3 Defensive Driving Tips That Could Save Your Life

Many jobs require employees to drive a company vehicle. While most drivers are cautious and attentive, accidents can occur without warning—even if the operator has years of experience.

When accidents happen, it can be incredibly costly for employers. What’s more, just one accident can cost employees their job or lead to serious, debilitating injuries.

One way to stay safe while you’re on the road for a job is through defensive driving. Being a defensive driver means driving to prevent accidents in spite of the actions of others or the presence of adverse driving conditions.

To avoid accidents through the use of defensive driving, do the following:

  • Remain on the lookout for hazards. Think about what may happen as far ahead of you as possible, and never assume that road hazards will resolve themselves before you reach them.
  • Understand the defense. Review potentially hazardous situations in your mind after you see them. This will allow you to formulate a reaction that will prevent an accident.
  • Act quickly. Once you see a hazard and decide upon a defense, you must act immediately. The sooner you act, the more time you will have to avoid a potentially dangerous situation.

Defensive driving requires the knowledge and strict observance of all traffic rules and regulations applicable to the area you are driving in. It also means that you should be alert for illegal actions and driving errors made by others and be willing to make timely adjustments to your own driving to avoid an accident.

Keeping in mind the above tips will not only keep you safe on the job, but in your personal life as well.

Poor indoor air quality can cause chronic headaches, allergies, fatigue and irritation of the lungs, among other symptoms.

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Trucking Risk Advisor - April 2018 Edition

New Study Shows Importance of Quality Sleep

Commercial drivers often have to work long hours in adverse conditions to meet deadlines, putting themselves and surrounding traffic at risk. According to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drowsy driving is involved in almost 10 percent of all motor crashes.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently conducted a study to determine how sleep quality affects drivers. Although the agency found that some solutions—such as team drivers working on shifts—helps drivers get more sleep, this isn’t as restful and can still lead to drowsy driving.

Although NIOSH believes that the best way to get restful sleep is to stop driving and find a stationary bed in a quiet setting, the agency also announced that it’s examining alternative methods to get quiet sleep, such as enhanced truck cabs with therapeutic mattress systems and behavioral sleep health programs.

Agriculture Truckers Granted Additional ELD Waiver

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) recently granted agriculture truckers a second 90-day waiver from the electronic logging device (ELD) rule. The agency originally granted these truckers an ELD waiver that expired on March 18, 2018, in order to address the unique needs of the agricultural industry. However, the FMCSA believes that it needs more time in order to publish final guidance on personal conveyance and a 150 air-mile hours-of-service exemption.

The ELD rule went into effect on Dec. 18, 2017, but violations will only affect a motor carrier’s Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) program scores after April 1, 2018. For more information on the recent waivers and the ELD rule, visit the FMCSA’s website.

DOT Announces Nearly $500 Million in Infrastructure Grants

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) announced that it will issue nearly $500 million in grants to 41 projects through its Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) program. According to the DOT, the TIGER program helps ensure that transparent funding is available for transportation infrastructure projects. When announcing the grants, the agency also stated that the program helps increase safety, create jobs and modernize infrastructure.

Visit the DOT’s website to learn more about the TIGER program and the recently announced grants.

Newsletter Provided by: Hierl's Property & Casualty Experts

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OSHA Safety Cornerstones - April 2018 Newsletter

IN THIS ISSUE

OSHA Delays Beryllium Rule Enforcement

The agency also clarified requirements for the construction and shipyard industries.

Majority of Establishments Failed to Submit 2016 Electronic Reporting Data

A delayed compliance date and confusion about exemptions caused many establishments to fail to report 2017 data electronically.

OSHA Releases Two New Fact Sheets on Electricity Safety

These new resources can help protect employees who frequently work around electricity and downed power lines.

OSHA Delays Beryllium Rule and Clarifies Requirements for Construction and Shipyards

Although OSHA’s final rule on beryllium exposure in the general, construction and shipyard industries became effective on May 20, 2017, the agency recently announced that it will delay enforcement until May 11, 2018. OSHA also announced that some of the rule’s requirements will vary between the three affected industries.

Beryllium is a toxic metal that’s commonly found in machine parts, electronics and aircraft. The metal is a known carcinogen and can also cause respiratory problems, skin disease and many other adverse health effects. For these reasons, OSHA has lowered the exposure limits for employers in the general, construction and shipyard industries:

  • The permissible exposure limit (PEL) of an eight-hour average has been lowered to 0.2 micrograms per cubic meter of air (μg/m3). The previous PEL was 2.0 μg/m3, a limit that OSHA found to pose a significant health hazard to employees.
  • The short-term exposure limit (STEL) over a 15-minute period has been lowered to 2.0 μg/m3.

Although the new beryllium rule contains additional requirements, OSHA will only require the construction and shipyard industries to follow the new PEL and STEL. The agency stated that employees in these industries don’t frequently work near dangerous amounts of beryllium and are protected by the safety requirements found in other OSHA standards.

General industry employers must follow these additional beryllium control methods:

  • Provide exposure assessment to employees who are reasonably expected to be exposed to beryllium.
  • Establish, maintain and distinguish work areas that may contain dangerous amounts of beryllium.
  • Create and regularly update a written beryllium exposure plan.
  • Provide adequate respiratory protection and other personal protective equipment to employees who work near beryllium.
  • Train employees on beryllium hazards and control methods.
  • Maintain work areas that contain beryllium and—under certain conditions—establish facilities for employees to wash and change out of contaminated clothing or equipment.

According to a new report from Bloomberg Environment, a majority of the establishments that were required to submit 2016 injury and illness data under OSHA’s electronic reporting rule failed to do so. OSHA expected to receive about 350,000 reports, but the agency only received just over 150,000.

The final date to submit 2016 injury and illness reports was Dec. 31, 2017, but this date was delayed a number of times as OSHA worked to build its Injury Tracking Application and improve its cyber security. Bloomberg also attributes the large number of missing reports to confusion about exemptions, as OSHA received over 60,000 reports from exempt establishments.

Under the rule, the following establishments must submit data electronically:

  • Establishments with 250 or more employees that are required to keep injury and illness records must submit OSHA Forms 300, 300A and 301.
  • Establishments with 20 to 249 employees that work in industries with historically high rates of occupational injuries and illnesses must submit OSHA Form 300A.

The final date to submit 2017 injury and illness data electronically is July 1, 2018. Beginning in 2019, data from the previous calendar year must be submitted by March 2 annually.

NEWS & NOTES:

OSHA Releases Two New Fact Sheets on Electricity Safety

OSHA has released two electricity fact sheets in order to protect employees who frequently work with electricity and power lines. According to the Electrical Safety Foundation International, electricity causes over 150 fatalities and 1,500 injuries in U.S. workplaces every year.

Here are some of the topics included in the first new fact sheet, which can provide tips for engineers, electricians and other employees who work with electricity:

  • Generators
  • Power lines
  • Extension cords
  • Equipment
  • Electrical incidents

The second fact sheet focuses on downed electrical wires and can help employees involved in recovery efforts following disasters and severe weather events.

Protecting employees from electrical hazards not only keeps your business productive, it can also save you from costly OSHA citations. The agency’s electrical wiring method standard is one of the top 10 most frequently cited standards nearly every year.

For resources that can help safeguard your business against electrical hazards, contact us today.

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Provided by Hierl Insurance Inc.


Safety Focused Newsletter - April 2018

How Indoor Air Quality Affects Health

Indoor air quality (IAQ) has a direct impact on your health, comfort, well-being and productivity. Poor IAQ can cause chronic headaches, allergies, fatigue and irritation of the lungs, among other symptoms.

What’s more, when IAQ is poor, it can have a direct effect on your productivity. If you are worried about the IAQ at your workplace, watch out for these symptoms:

  • Dryness or irritation of the eyes, nose, throat and lungs
  • Shortness of breath and fatigue
  • Nausea, headaches and dizziness
  • Chronic coughing and sneezing

If you suspect you are suffering from the effects of poor IAQ at your workplace, keep track of your symptoms and speak with your manager. As with many occupational illnesses, individuals may be affected differently.

If you are experiencing symptoms that your co-workers aren’t, that doesn’t mean an IAQ problem doesn’t exist and it’s still important to notify your employer. If your symptoms persist, consider speaking to a qualified medical professional.

3 Defensive Driving Tips That Could Save Your Life

Many jobs require employees to drive a company vehicle. While most drivers are cautious and attentive, accidents can occur without warning—even if the operator has years of experience.

When accidents happen, it can be incredibly costly for employers. What’s more, just one accident can cost employees their job or lead to serious, debilitating injuries.

One way to stay safe while you’re on the road for a job is through defensive driving. Being a defensive driver means driving to prevent accidents in spite of the actions of others or the presence of adverse driving conditions.

To avoid accidents through the use of defensive driving, do the following:

  • Remain on the lookout for hazards. Think about what may happen as far ahead of you as possible, and never assume that road hazards will resolve themselves before you reach them.
  • Understand the defense. Review potentially hazardous situations in your mind after you see them. This will allow you to formulate a reaction that will prevent an accident.
  • Act quickly. Once you see a hazard and decide upon a defense, you must act immediately. The sooner you act, the more time you will have to avoid a potentially dangerous situation.

Defensive driving requires the knowledge and strict observance of all traffic rules and regulations applicable to the area you are driving in. It also means that you should be alert for illegal actions and driving errors made by others and be willing to make timely adjustments to your own driving to avoid an accident.

Keeping in mind the above tips will not only keep you safe on the job, but in your personal life as well.

4 Tips for Safe Driving:

Avoid Distractions.

Be Alert.

Keep a Safe Distance.

Don't Speed.

Poor indoor air quality can cause chronic headaches, allergies, fatigue and irritation of the lungs, among other symptoms.

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Workers Willing to Leave a Job if Not Praised Enough

Praising your employees on a frequent basis is a great way to increase employee engagement and productivity. Take a look at this article by Brookie Madison from Employee Benefit News on how employees are more likely to leave a job if they do not feel like they're getting enough praise.

Employers may be spending more than $46 billion a year on employee recognition, reviews and work anniversaries, but recent research shows it could be worth the investment to commit even more to the effort.

Although more than 22% of senior decision-makers don’t think that regular recognition and thanking employees at work has a big influence on staff retention, 70% of employees say that motivation and morale would improve “massively” with managers saying thank you more, according to a Reward Gateway study.

By not receiving regular feedback on their performance, employees feel they are not progressing at work, says Glenn Elliott, CEO of Reward Gateway. In fact, nearly one in two employees reported they would leave a company if they did not feel appreciated at work, the study found.

This is particularly true of millennials, Elliott says, who make up the largest segment of the workforce, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. To this generation, “Saying thank you for good work or good behavior shows you values those things and want to see more of that behavior,” he says.

Overall, employees want praise and recognition more frequently than at annual awards ceremonies. Although 90% of senior decision-makers believe they prioritize showing appreciation and thanks in a timely way, more than 60% of workers would like to see their colleagues’ good work praised more frequently by managers and leaders.

“On average, businesses spend 2% on recognition,” says Elliott. “Businesses can increase effects of recognition by moving money from tenure-based to valued- and behavior-based recognition.”

More than eight out of 10 workers (84%) say praise should be given on a continual, year-round basis.

The Reward Gateway study polled 500 workers and 500 decision-makers in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia.

See the original article Here.

Source:

Madison B. (2017 June 11). Workers willing to leave a job if not praised enough [Web blog post]. Retrieved from address https://www.benefitnews.com/news/workers-willing-to-leave-a-job-if-not-praised-enough


HSAs vs. HRAs: Things Employers Should Consider

Great article from our partner, United Benefit Advisors (UBA) by Bob Bentley on what employers should know about choosing between HSAs and HRAs.

With health care costs and insurance premiums continuing to rise, employers are looking for ways to reduce their insurance expenses. That usually means increasing medical plan deductibles. According to the latest UBA Health Plan Survey, the average in-network single medical plan deductible increased from $2,031 in 2015 to $2,127 in 2016. But shifting costs to employees can be detrimental to an employer’s efforts to attract and retain top talent. Employers are looking for solutions that reduce their costs while minimizing the impact on employees.

One way employers can mitigate increasing deductibles is by packaging a high-deductible health plan with either a health savings account (HSA) contribution or a health reimbursement arrangement (HRA). Either can be used to bridge some or all of the gap between a lower deductible and a higher deductible while reducing insurance premiums, and both offer tax benefits for employers and employees. However, there are advantages and disadvantages to each approach that employers need to consider.

Health Savings Account (HSA) General Attributes

  • The employee owns the account and can take it when changing jobs.
  • HSA contributions can be made by the employer or employee, subject to a maximum contribution established by the government.
  • Triple tax advantage – funds go in tax-free, accounts grow tax-free, and withdrawals are tax-free as long as they are for qualified expenses (see IRS publication 502).
  • Funds may accumulate for years and be used during retirement.
  • The HSA must be paired with an IRS qualified high-deductible health plan (QHDHP); not just any plan with a deductible of $1,300 or more will qualify.

HSA Advantages

  • Costs are more predictable as they are not related to actual expenses, which can vary from year to year; contributions may also be spread out through the year to improve cash flow.
  • Employees become better consumers since there is an incentive to not spend the money and let it accumulate. This can result in an immediate reduction in claims costs for a self-funded plan.
  • HSAs can be set up with fewer administration costs; usually no administrator is needed, and no ERISA summary plan description (SPD) is needed.
  • The employer is not held responsible by the IRS for ensuring that the employee is eligible and that the contribution maximums are not exceeded.

HSA Disadvantages

  • Employees cannot participate if they’re also covered under a non-qualified health plan, which includes Tricare, Medicare, or even a spouse’s flexible spending account (FSA).
  • Employees accustomed to copays for office visits or prescriptions may be unhappy with the benefits of the QHDHP.
  • IRS rules can be confusing; IRS penalties may apply if the employee is ineligible for a contribution or other mistakes are made, which might intimidate employees.
  • Employees may forgo treatment to avoid spending their HSA balance or if they have no HSA funds available.

Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA) General Attributes

  • Only an employer can contribute to an HRA; employees cannot.
  • The employer controls the cash until a claim is filed by the employee for reimbursement.
  • HRA contributions are tax deductible to the employer and tax-free to the employee.
  • To comply with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), an HRA must be combined with a group medical insurance plan that meets ACA requirements.

HRA Advantages

  • HRAs offer more employer control and flexibility on the design of the HRA and the health plan does not need to be HSA qualified.
  • The employer can set it up as “use it or lose it” each year, thus reducing funding costs.
  • An HRA is compatible with an FSA (not just limited-purpose FSA).
  • Depending on the employer group, HRAs can sometimes be less confusing for employees, particularly if the plan design is simple.
  • HRA funds revert to the employer when an employee leaves – which might increase employee retention.

HRA Disadvantages

  • Self-employed individuals cannot participate in HRA funding.
  • There is little or no incentive for employees to control utilization since funds may not accumulate from year to year.
  • More administration may be necessary – HRAs are subject to ERISA and COBRA laws.
  • HRAs could raise HIPAA privacy concerns and create the need for policies and testing.

Both HSAs and HRAs can be of tremendous value to employers and employees. As shown, there are, however, a number of considerations to determine the best program and design for each situation. In some cases, employers may consider offering both, allowing employees to choose between an HSA contribution and a comparable HRA contribution, according to their individual circumstances.

For a comprehensive chart that compares eligibility criteria, contribution rules, reimbursement rules, reporting requirements, privacy requirements, applicable fees, non-discrimination rules and other characteristics of account-based plans, request UBA’s Compliance Advisor,  “HRAs, HSAs, and Health FSAs – What’s the Difference?”.

For information on modest contribution strategies that are still driving enrollment in HSA and HRA plans, read our breaking news release.

For a detailed look at the prevalence and enrollment rates among HSA and HRA plans by industry, region and group size, view UBA’s "Special Report: How Health Savings Accounts Measure Up", to understand which aspects of these accounts are most successful, and least successful.

See the original article Here.

Source:

Bentley B. (2017 May 12). HSAs vs. HRAs: things employers should consider[Web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://blog.ubabenefits.com/hsas-vs.-hras-things-employers-should-consider


HSAs and Employer Responsibilities

Do you know all the responsibilities an employer will face when dealing with HSAs? If not, take a look at this great article from our partner, United Benefit Advisors (UBA) by Vicki Randall and find out about all the HSA responsibilities facing employers.

It’s no secret that one of the primary agenda items of the new Republican administration is to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and to sign into law a plan that they feel will be more effective in managing health care costs. Their initial attempt at a new plan, called the American Health Care Act (AHCA), included an increased focus on leveraging health savings accounts (HSAs) to accomplish this goal. As the plan gets debated and modified in Congress, we do not know whether the role of HSAs will be expanded or not, but they will continue to be a part of the landscape in some shape or form.

HSAs first came into existence in 2003 and they have been gaining momentum as a way to deal with increasing health care costs ever since. If you, as a plan sponsor, do not already offer a health plan compatible with an HSA, chances are you’ve at least discussed them during your annual plan reviews. So, what exactly is an HSA and what is an employer’s responsibility relating to one?

An HSA is a tax-favored account established by an individual to pay for certain medical expenses incurred by account holders and their spouses and tax dependents. Anyone can make a contribution to an eligible Individual’s HSA. This includes the individual’s employer. However, if employers contribute to participant HSAs, employers must:

  1. Ensure their health plan meets high-deductible health plan (HDHP) requirements,
  2. Determine eligibility,
  3. Establish contribution method,
  4. Provide W-2 reporting, and
  5. Confirm employer involvement in the HSA does not create an ERISA plan, or cause a prohibited transaction.

High-Deductible Health Plan Requirements

Plan sponsors should make sure their plan meets certain HDHP requirements before making contributions to participants’ HSAs.

Characteristics of an HDHP

An HDHP is a health plan that has statutorily prescribed minimum deductible and maximum out-of-pocket limits. The limits are adjusted annually for inflation.

For example, for 2017, the limits for self-only coverage are:

  • Minimum Deductible: $1,300
  • Maximum Out-of-Pocket: $6,550

The limits for family coverage (i.e., any coverage other than self-only coverage) are twice the applicable amounts for self-only coverage. The limits are adjusted annually for inflation and, for a given year, are published by the IRS no later than June 1 of the preceding year. In addition, an HDHP cannot pay any benefits until the deductible is met. The only exception to this rule is benefits for preventive care.

Eligibility

Eligible Individuals can make or receive contributions to their HSAs. A person is an eligible individual if he or she is covered by an HDHP and is not covered by any other plan that pays medical benefits, subject to certain exceptions.

Employer Contribution Methods

Employers that contribute to the HSAs of their employees may do so inside or outside of a cafeteria (Section 125) plan. The contribution rules are different for each option.

Contributions Outside of a Cafeteria Plan

When contributing to any employee’s HSA outside of a cafeteria plan, an employer must make comparable contributions to the HSAs of all comparable participating employees.

Contributions Made Through a Cafeteria Plan

HSA contributions made through a cafeteria plan do not have to satisfy the comparability rules, but are subject to the Section 125 non-discrimination rules for cafeteria plans. HSA employer contributions will be treated as being made through a cafeteria plan if the cafeteria plan permits employees to make pre-tax salary reduction contributions.

Employer HSA Contribution Amounts

Contributions from all sources cannot exceed certain annual limits prescribed by the IRS. Although employer contributions cannot exceed the applicable limits, employers are only responsible for determining the following with respect to an employee’s eligibility and maximum annual contribution limit on HSA contributions:

  • Whether the employee is covered under an HDHP or low-deductible health plan, or plans (including health flexible spending accounts (FSAs) and health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs) sponsored by that employer; and
  • The employee’s age (for catch-up contributions). The employer may rely on the employee’s representation as to his or her date of birth.

When employers contribute to the HSAs of their employees and retirees, the amount of the contribution is excludable from the eligible individual’s income and is deductible by the employer provided they do not exceed the applicable limit. Withholding for income tax, FICA, FUTA, or RRTA taxes is not required if, at the time of the contribution, the employer reasonably believes that contribution will be excludable from the employee’s income.

Employer Reporting Requirements

An employer must report the amount of its contribution to an employee’s HSA in Box 12 of the employee’s W-2 using code W.

Design and Operational Considerations

Employers should make sure that their involvement in the HSA does not create an ERISA plan, or cause them to become involved in a prohibited transaction. To ensure that contributions will not cause the health plan to become subject to ERISA, certain restrictions exist that employers should be aware of and follow. Employer contributions to an HSA will not cause the employer to have established a health plan subject to ERISA provided:

  • The establishment of the HSA is completely voluntary on the part of the employees; and
  • The employer does not:
    • limit the ability of eligible individuals to move their funds to another HSA or impose conditions on utilization of HSA funds beyond those permitted under the code;
    • make or influence the investment decisions with respect to funds contributed to an HSA;
    • represent that the HSA is an employee welfare benefit plan established or maintained by the employer;
    • or receive any payment or compensation in connection with an HSA.

See the original article Here.

Source:

Randall V. (2017 May 25). HSAs and employer responsibilities [Web blog post]. Retrieved from address http://blog.ubabenefits.com/hsas-and-employer-responsibilities


CenterStage...The Experts Weigh In

5 Main Benefits of Self-Funding

Simply put, a Partially Self-Funded health plan is just an alternative, and often times more effective way of financing your employer sponsored health plan. Outside of “How does it work?” the questions that are most frequently asked are regarding the risks involved with this strategy and limiting the employer’s exposure. It was once thought that partially self-funding your health plan was reserved for only large employers. Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI.org) reported that in 2015 there was a 36.8% increase in private sector employers moving to partially self-funding. We don’t see the use of this strategy slowing down any time soon. It’s all about building the self-funded plan the right way in order to reduce the risk, while at the same time creating opportunity for savings.

A well designed self-funded plan built by a knowledgeable advisor will result in healthier employees and money saved over time. The opportunity for nearly all size employers is substantial. Whether your company is large enough to be completely self-funded, or are mid-size and need stop loss, or are smaller and can take advantage of a level-funding type plan, there are self-funding opportunities for all size employers.

In this article, Scott Smeaton shares his insights on what makes self-funded plans beneficial and what Hierl can do to help.

Scott Smeaton, Executive Vice President

“My advice to anyone who is considering moving to a self funded plan from a traditionally funded plan is that it’s not a one year strategy,” said Scott Smeaton, Executive Vice President of Hierl. “Take the time to find a knowledgeable advisor who will help you understand the risks and opportunities with self-funding, and commit to it for at least three years."

1. Financial Control

The most significant benefit of self-funding is the resulting increased financial control. Self-funded plans often times improve cash flow as funds that would otherwise be held by the insurance carrier for unreported or pending claims are free for use. With a self-funded plan, employers have access to detailed reports and documentation of how every health plan dollar is spent. “We’ve all heard the phrase, we can’t manage what we can’t measure”. Self-funded plans provide access to information that we otherwise would not have.

2. Lower Costs

While traditional fully insured plans allow for a guaranteed monthly cost, meaning the premium stays the same month to month, self-funded plans provide greater flexibility where you only pay for what you use. The disadvantage of a traditional plan is that in a year that the claims and administrative expenses are less than the premium an employer paid – none of that money will be refunded back.

With a partially self-funded plan, you will have administrative and stop loss insurance expenses that will be about 20% of your total budget. The other 80% is purely claims. If at the end of the year your claims were lower than expected, the employer realizes the savings. In a year when claims exceed what is expected, we have stop loss insurance to protect the employer and its employees.

“Wellness efforts and self-funded benefit plans can often work hand in hand in reducing your annual health plan costs,” explained Scott. “I often tell employers who are currently fully insured and have experienced low claims cost that if you believe you can have a positive impact on the health and wellbeing of your employees, then a self-funded plan will be perfect for you because you will be rewarded for wellness efforts and initiatives.”

3. Increased Flexibility

Self-funded plans provide employers the flexibility to design a health benefit plan that addresses specific employee needs as well as company objectives. When compared to traditional plans, self-funded plans allow you to choose your own partners and plan designs. Whether it’s the provider network, the prescription benefit manager, utilization management or centers of excellence manager, vendors can be hand selected from national provider networks to incorporate in the program.

A fully insured plan is required to meet state mandates, state premiums taxes, and ACA taxes among other expenses. Self-funded plans are not subject to the state mandates and either avoids or minimizes many of the taxes.

4. Control Over Plan Design

A downside of traditional plans is being required to select an off-the-shelf plan that your insurance carrier offers.

“One of the things we are doing with our self-funded plans is designing our plans in a way that drives employees to seek out the highest quality but lowest cost providers within their provider network. Provider discounts are great, but there’s even more savings to be gained by creating incentives to seek care from these highest quality, lowest cost providers within that network. Employees are beginning to understand the importance of being better healthcare consumers and it’s paying off. When this happens, it’s only in a self-funded environment that you see the maximum savings from these efforts,” said Scott.

5. Information Management

Self-funded plans provide convenient, secure access to all the necessary information needed to effectively manage plan structure. With a self-funded plan, you can:

  • Track and report data regularly: tracking data allows monthly or quarterly patterns to be detected and acted upon accordingly. Proactive data tracking helps employers stay on top of what is coming next.
  • Utilize predictive plan modeling: past and current claim data can be used to analyze risks and forecast costs allowing for spending waste to be eliminated.

How can Hierl help?

If an employer is moving to a self-funded plan for the first time, Hierl walks clients through a simple process beginning with a risk tolerance analysis to be sure that the plan design keeps the client within their comfort level. From there, Hierl assists with finding a product and design that meets a client’s specific needs. Whether this is a level-funded plan, a captive self-funded plan that limits exposure, or a stop-loss plan that will refund any excess premium at the end of the year, an expert will help determine the best plan for the employer and their employees.

Hierl’s Self-Funded Renewal 101

Here’s an example of the process Hierl guides fully insured clients through as they transition to selffunding. For more information or assistance reach out to an expert at Hierl today.

  • 9-6 months before renewal - Hierl walks clients through all the components of how self-funding works (Self-Funding 101).
  • 6-7 months before the renewal - Hierl facilitates interviews with TPA (Third Party Administrators) in order to select the TPA that best meets the client’s goals and objectives.
  • 5-6 months before renewal - Hierl provides benefit modeling to illustrate self-funding plan design and financial projections in order to compare it to the current fully insured plan.
  • 2-4 months before renewal – Implementation and enrollment is completed.

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