ELD Enforcement Contributes to Rising Freight Rates

Electronic logging device (ELD) enforcement has contributed to rapidly growing freight rates, according to a report from transportation information firm DAT Solutions. The firm found that 3 percent of surveyed truckers planned to retire instead of comply with the ELD rule, which was a large factor in a 7 percent drop in year-over-year trucking capacity.

Although the ELD rule came into effect at the end of 2017, the Department of Transportation only began enforcement of the rule on April 1, 2018. ELDs automatically track a driver’s compliance with federal hours-of-service limits, and drivers who don’t use the devices must stop driving until one is installed.

While freight rates in April are generally lower following the end of the first quarter, DAT Solutions’ report found that rates have increased as motor carriers struggle to account for a shortage of skilled drivers.

Call us at 920-921-5921 for more information on trends in the trucking industry.

New Technology May Replace Mirrors With Camera-based Systems

Although sideview mirrors allow drivers to stay aware of surrounding traffic, the large devices offer limited viewing angles and create drag that lowers fuel economy. As a result, some technology companies are advocating for the use of camera-based systems to improve safety and lower operating costs.

Prototype camera systems feature multiple, internally wired cameras that provide drivers with multiple views of adjacent lanes, the blind spot in front of a truck’s hood and the ground on each side of the vehicle. The cameras themselves also include a number of safety features:

  • Redundant systems to reduce the chances of a malfunction
  • Low-light visibility options
  • Heated glass to prevent the buildup of ice and frost
  • Special coatings that resist rain and moisture

Camera systems can improve a heavy-duty truck’s fuel economy by approximately 2.5 percent and lead to over $1,300 in annual fuel savings. The systems can also lead to savings by reducing crashes, as traditional mirrors are limited by large blind spots, glares, night visibility and adverse weather.

The FMCSA is currently accepting public comments on an exemption for the MirrorEye camera system, which has been used in Europe since 2016. For more information, visit the FMCSA’s notice in the Federal Register.