In this November / December Health Care Profile, we will dive into digital innovation within hospitals, the financial benefit of easing doctor burnout, and how the federal government threaten three Massachusetts psychiatric hospitals. Read more below.


HOSPITALS WANT DIGITAL INNOVATION

A survey conducted by the American Hospital Association (AHA) and health innovation company AVIA found that 85 percent of health care leaders realize that digital innovation is a key factor in the long-term success of their health care organizations.

Survey respondents included executives and innovation officers from 317 health systems in 48 states. When asked to define innovation, almost 75 percent of survey respondents said that it involves collaborating with innovative organizations, and 42 percent said that they believe innovation includes testing and scaling externally developed digital solutions.

Christina Jack, the AHA’s senior director of entrepreneur strategy and innovation, stated that digital innovation could be hampered by the fact that it is dependent upon the competencies of a chief information officer. And, as a result, it isn’t woven into an organization’s operations.

Nonetheless, the health care leaders who participated in the survey were hopeful about the future and stated that, if done correctly, digital innovations could improve the patient and workplace experience for both physicians and staff, as well as improve safety and decrease costs.

According to the survey, areas where hospitals have already invested in digital innovation include operational efficiencies, primary care delivery and utilization, patient access and care transitions.

FEDS THREATEN 3 PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALS

The federal government threatened ceasing Medicare payments to three Massachusetts psychiatric hospitals after safety lapses caused two mentally ill patients to forgo critical medication. One patient had a seizure and suffered a traumatic head injury as a result.

 

According to a letter dated Sept. 8 from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to the CEO of all three hospitals, conditions discovered on Aug. 28, 29 and 30 posed an immediate jeopardy to the health and safety of patients, limiting the hospitals’ capacity to render adequate care.

FINANCIAL BENEFIT OF EASING DOCTOR BURNOUT

According to a recent study published in JAMA’s Internal Medicine, addressing doctor burnout could save hospitals over $1 million per year.

The study looked at the cost of physician turnover as a whole and then used evidence to determine how many physicians leave their jobs because of burnout. It found that for an organization that employs 450 doctors, doctors who leave due to burnout cost the organization $2.5 million per year. If the same organization spent $1 million per year to lower the risk of burnout by 20 percent, it could save about $1.25 million each year.

Researchers said that the ways to decrease burnout involve understanding what causes it, such as a lack of work-life balance, heavy workloads, and a lack of flexibility and control.