Are you a SHRM member and/or HR professional? In this article from SHRM by Mary Kaylor, she dives into what SHRM Connect is and how you can get involved!

You can read the original article here.

SHRM Connect is an online community where SHRM members can ask questions and get answers on a variety of HR topics. It’s a great place to network with other HR professionals and share solutions.

The conversation topics range from “HR Department of One” to Employment Law, are always insightful, and deal with some of the most pressing issues that HR professionals face in the workplace today.

While some of the conversations take on a more serious tone, others will deliver a bit of comic relief — and on Fridays, I’ll be highlighting a conversation or two in hopes that you’ll take some time to visit. You may want to “lurk”… perhaps respond, but you’ll always learn something.

It’s a great community and I highly recommend checking it out.

While May is officially Mental Health Awareness month, HR must deal with employee mental health issues, and their effects on the workplace, all year long. This week’s highlighted conversations involve a few different scenarios. What would you do?

Subject: Self Harming

In the General HR area, a poster asks for advice on how to handle about a perceived case of self harming:

We have a new(er) employee that was observed by another employee to have cuts up and down her arm. The employee brought it to our attention out of concern. We thanked the employee and asked that she keep it confidential. We do not offer an EAP.

My thought is to speak with the employee that is self harming and let her know what was observed and just check in and see if she is ok. If she says everything is good, just leave it at that. If she mentions something is going on…or if she needs to seek treatment etc, go down that road.

For those of you who have experience with this, is this an ok approach? Is it best to not address it with the employee? Any other resources, since an EAP is not an option?


To read/respond to this conversation, please click here.

* * * * *

Subject: Alcohol and Discussion of Suicide

In the General HR area, another poster asks for advice on monitoring an employee:

Know of an employee with an alcohol problem who has gone through treatment and released to return to work by the treating facility. Prior to admittance, she talked about suicide. What follow-ups by the employer would you suggest, other than a monitoring agreement for a period of time?

To read/respond to this conversation, please click here.

* * * * *

Subject: WWYD

In the General HR area, yet another poster is wondering how others would handle a case of an employee with anxiety – and lots of absences:

I was hoping to get opinions on this situation, and I believe I know the correct way to follow up but I was interested to see what others would say.

We hired a non-exempt employee in July of this year. Since that time, this employee had 6 unexcused absences, and two preplanned days off. We accrue and allow employees to use their vacation leave from day one, and this employee essentially used all the time throughout the end of the year. Sick time is not available for employees until they’ve been employed for 90 days. This employee stated about a month ago after one of their absences that they has very bad anxiety, but does not have insurance they are unable to get medication or see a doctor. This employee never asked for any type of accommodation, and we actually even provided resources to assist with their anxiety. All of the times they called out after that conversation were simply because “i feel bad and can’t come in”. I received copies of the texts and they’re pretty vague. They called out again on Tuesday after having a pre-planned half day off on Friday, and we decided to give the employee a final written warning with a 60 day timeframe to improve their attendance. Unfortunately the employee called out again yesterday with a very vague explanation and stated that ‘I still feel pretty bad’.

After speaking with the managers over this department, we decided to terminate employment due to excessive absences. I explained that to the employee in the phone call and gave them an opportunity to explain themselves. I tried to create a dialogue in the event that we were missing something, but I just got ‘heh. oh okay.’

Now this morning, I received a page long email stating this employee has rights under HIPAA that they didn’t have to disclose the anxiety disorders that they have (we never asked, they disclosed it voluntarily). Also stated that they would have expected a written warning for their excessive absenteeism but not the fact we separated employment. They go on to blame us for other areas of lacking (training, etc) but said we amplified the anxiety problem because of the amount of training we were giving them.

I feel like this employee is looking for anyone to blame. It’s an unfortunate situation but as an employer, we cannot read employees minds. If an employee needs an accommodation due to a medical condition, aren’t they supposed to request it? How are we supposed to help with vague callouts?


You can read the original article here.


Taylor M. (22 September 2017). “SHRM Connect: Mental Health Issues in the Workplace – What Would You Do?” [Web Blog Post]. Retrieved from address